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Sewage plant in Seattle back to normal operations

In this March 16, 2017, photo, Robert Waddle, division operations manager at the West Point Treatment Plant in Seattle, stands near a closed valve next to empty pools normally used to remove grit and other solids from sewage and storm water. (Ted S. Warren / Associated Press)
In this March 16, 2017, photo, Robert Waddle, division operations manager at the West Point Treatment Plant in Seattle, stands near a closed valve next to empty pools normally used to remove grit and other solids from sewage and storm water. (Ted S. Warren / Associated Press)

SEATTLE – The state’s largest sewage treatment plant is back to normal operations after a February electrical failure resulted in flooding that damaged equipment.

King County announced Thursday that the West Point Treatment plant in Seattle is now fully treating dirty water that goes down toilets and washes off roofs and roads before discharging it into Puget Sound.

The county-run facility had been running at limited capacity since Feb. 9 when flooding caused at least $25 million in equipment and other damage.

Millions of gallons of raw sewage and untreated runoff have poured into Puget Sound, though no raw sewage has flowed from the plant since Feb. 16.

Meanwhile, an independent probe is looking into what went wrong.

Officials say they’ll now focus on other long-term repairs to be completed this year.


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