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Spokane

100 years ago in Washington: Only 1 in 7 graduate from high school

In 1917, the state’s high school graduation rate was shockingly low, by today’s standards. Only one out of every seven children who started school in Washington would make it through high school, The Spokesman-Review reported on Dec. 6, 1917. (Spokesman-Review)
In 1917, the state’s high school graduation rate was shockingly low, by today’s standards. Only one out of every seven children who started school in Washington would make it through high school, The Spokesman-Review reported on Dec. 6, 1917. (Spokesman-Review)

In 1917, the state’s high school graduation rate was shockingly low, by today’s standards.

Only one out of every seven children who started school in Washington would make it through high school.

The state superintendent of public instruction released figures that showed the extent of the problem.

While 35,809 children were enrolled in first grade, only 5,629 were enrolled in 12th grade.

The vast majority of students dropped out of school somewhere in between.

The biggest drop-off occurred between eight and ninth grades — the beginning of high school. A surprising number dropped out even before reaching eighth grade.

The Spokane enrollment numbers were somewhat better, meaning the “slump is not so pronounced.”

From the hunting beat: A Kellogg boy, 17, was hunting deer in the mountains outside of town when he lost his way.

His parents and neighbors fanned out into the timber to look for him, to no avail. The boy was forced to spend the night huddled in a cedar stump, cold and wet.

The next day some woodsmen found him when they heard signal shots from his gun. He survived the ordeal, but his feet were frostbitten.