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Chef Spotlight: Molly Patrick

UPDATED: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2017, 10:59 A.M.

Molly Patrick is the executive chef of the  Blackbird restaurant at 905 N. Washington St. in Spokane. It is in the old Broadview Dairy building. DAN PELLE danp@spokesman.com (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)
Molly Patrick is the executive chef of the Blackbird restaurant at 905 N. Washington St. in Spokane. It is in the old Broadview Dairy building. DAN PELLE danp@spokesman.com (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)

This occasional series helps us get to know local chefs.

We’ll learn about where they dine out and who or what inspired them in their culinary careers. Plus, they’ll share a recipe.

Here’s a Q&A with Molly Patrick, 36, head chef at the Blackbird and Manito Tap House in Spokane.

What’s your favorite dish to cook at home? Ribs with greens, mac-and-cheese and cornbread.

Where do you eat when you eat out? I don’t go out much, but when I do it’s to locally owned restaurants.

Who or what inspired you to become a chef, and how? My first job was in a kitchen, so I would say my team at the time inspired me. I felt like that was where I belonged and what I was meant to be doing. Now, I still find inspiration from my team, but also Rene Redzepi, chef of Noma, and Dominique Crenn, chef of Atelier Crenn. And, just the idea of being great and continuously learning inspires me.

What are your go-to ingredients? Love, passion and finesse.

What was the first dish a customer ever sent back to you, and how did you handle it? I can’t remember. You’re never happy when something comes back. You just fix it, and if there is something to learn from it, then learn it.

What’s a dish you’ve never made but would like to, and why? I want to make food that levitates from the plate.

What dish or ingredient best represents you? I’m like an onion. I have lots of layers, and I’ve been known to make people cry.

Braised Goat Shoulder for Tacos or Just Because

From Molly Patrick of The Blackbird and Manito Tap House

I love goat. I love it because it’s simple food and when you take a bite it’s like being at home. Not a fan or can’t get your hands on any goat? The same treatment can be used on chicken, just adjust the cooking time to 2 hours.

1 bone-in goat shoulder, about 4-5 pounds

12 ounces light beer

4 ancho chilies

Sea salt

4 guajillo chilies

2 serrano chilies, diced

1 teaspoon toasted black peppercorns

2 teaspoons whole cloves

1 teaspoon cumin toasted

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 cinnamon stick

1 onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, smashed and chopped

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

2 pounds roasted tomato puree

2 bunches cilantro, chopped

Sear goat shoulder. Deglaze with beer. Add remaining ingredients.

Cover and braise for 3 hours or until fork-tender in a 200-degree oven.



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