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Monday, December 17, 2018  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Idaho

Moscow residents complain about too-bright LED streetlights

Spokane residents struggled with the glare from new LED street lights, and now the city of Moscow, Idaho, is experiencing some of the same issues. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)
Spokane residents struggled with the glare from new LED street lights, and now the city of Moscow, Idaho, is experiencing some of the same issues. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)

MOSCOW, Idaho – The city of Moscow is replacing streetlights with energy-efficient LED bulbs that some residents complain are too bright for residential neighborhoods.

As traditional high-pressure sodium lights burn out across the city they are being replaced with LED streetlights, the Moscow-Pullman Daily News reported. Some people say the new bulbs glow too bright.

In a letter to the editor to the Daily News Monique Lillard said the new bulbs are inappropriate for residential neighborhoods.

“They glare in our eyes at odd moments when we are driving,” Lillard wrote. “Living next to them is like living next to an all-night stadium or a commercial parking lot.”

Moscow Public Works Department Deputy Director Tyler Palmer said the city takes resident complaints seriously and has been in contact with Avista Utilities, which owns and operates the streetlights in Moscow’s residential neighborhoods.

“We definitely want to respond to the concerns of our residents because ultimately our goal is to have a livable city and livable is defined by the people that live in it,” Palmer said.

Avista Regional Manager Paul Kimmell said Avista takes complaints seriously and will shield or redirect a light if a customer says it is intruding into his or her bedroom.

“We try to do our best to work with the customers as well as the community,” Kimmell said.

Complaints aside, the new LED lights use about 50 percent less energy than typical streetlights, last two to three times longer and provide a bright light for motorists and pedestrians. Avista started installing the new lights throughout northern Idaho and eastern Washington in 2015.

“As with most change, there are those who like it and those who may not,” Kimmell said.


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