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Tuesday, December 18, 2018  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Justice Sonia Sotomayor working on 3 books for young people

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor speaks the Newseum in Washington. Sotomayor is working on three books for young people, Penguin Young Readers told the Associated Press on Thursday, Nov. 2. (Carolyn Kaster / AP)
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor speaks the Newseum in Washington. Sotomayor is working on three books for young people, Penguin Young Readers told the Associated Press on Thursday, Nov. 2. (Carolyn Kaster / AP)

NEW YORK – Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor has a crowded book publishing schedule.

Sotomayor is working on three books for young people, Penguin Random House told The Associated Press on Thursday. She will be adapting her best-selling memoir “My Beloved World” for middle-graders. She will collaborate with illustrator Lulu Delacre on a picture-book autobiography about important books for her, “Turning Pages.” And she and illustrator Rafael Lopez plan a picture book about “childhood differences.” The two memoirs are scheduled for next fall. The book about childhood differences is expected in 2019.

Sotomayor, appointed to the court by President Barack Obama in 2009, said in a statement issued through her publisher that she hoped her book would show “happy endings are possible” even for struggling families.


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Top stories in Nation

News >  Nation

Senate overwhelmingly passes criminal justice overhaul

UPDATED: 7:56 p.m.

updated  The Senate passed a sweeping criminal justice bill Tuesday that addresses concerns that the nation’s war on drugs had led to the imprisonment of too many Americans for non-violent crimes without adequately preparing them for their return to society.