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100 years ago today in Spokane: Acheson awarded British Military Cross

From The Spokesman-Review archive, Sept. 26, 1917 (SR archives)
From The Spokesman-Review archive, Sept. 26, 1917 (SR archives)

Joseph Acheson, a former Spokane man, was awarded the British Military Cross by the British war office.

Acheson had worked as a banker at the Spokane branch of the Bank of Montreal several years previously. After the European war broke out, Acheson went to Vancouver and enlisted in the Canadian expeditionary force.

The citation that came with the medal said, “He led support troops in an attack under terrible shell fire, rendering invaluable assistance until he was severely wounded. Prior to the attack, his reconnaissance work, carried out under dangerous conditions, was of inestimable value.”

The nature and severity of his wounds were not specified. Acheson was a native of Ireland and had lived in Canada for several years before coming to Spokane. While in Spokane he was known as “a golf player” and was a figure in society circles.

From the fugitive beat: A notorious cattle rustler escaped from custody using a simple ruse.

The marshal, who had caught him near Rosalia, allowed his prisoner to go into his house to get his coat. After he didn’t re-emerge, the marshal went in and discovered that the prisoner had fled. The sheriff, clearly miffed, said drily that this marshal “appeared much surprised.”

He shouldn’t have been. This was the second time the man had escaped.

Earlier, the rustler had been caught near Chattaroy after he was found preparing to butcher a stolen steer. That time, the rustler got away by weeping and telling his captors that his “mother was starving to death.” His captors momentarily lowered their guns — and the rustler dashed into the woods. He was captured some days later near Rosalia.


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