Arrow-right Camera
A&E >  Stage

Composer Benoît Charest to lead orchestra during ‘Triplets of Belleville’ Cine-Concert at WSU

UPDATED: Wed., April 11, 2018, 10:15 a.m.

Benoît Charest and Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville during a “Triplets of Belleville” cine-concert in 2013. (Brett Delmage)
Benoît Charest and Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville during a “Triplets of Belleville” cine-concert in 2013. (Brett Delmage)

When watching a film like “The Triplets of Belleville,” an animated French comedy that relies more on song than on dialogue to tell the story, it’s a treat to see it with live orchestration.

WSU is making that cine-concert experience even more special by bringing in the film’s composer Benoît Charest to lead the eight-piece Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville in a live performance of his original score, complete with singing, dancing and live sound effects, while the film is screened above the orchestra. Included in the performance, of course, is the Oscar- and Grammy-nominated song “Belleville Rendez-vous.”

“The Triplets of Belleville,” released in 2003, follows a grandmother, Madame Souza, who sets out to save her kidnapped grandson, Champion, a Tour de France cyclist, while accompanied by her grandson’s dog, Bruno, and the title trio of music hall singers.

The movie features the voices of Michèle Caucheteux, Jean-Claude Donda, Michel Robin and Monica Viegas.

“The Triplets of Belleville” was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, losing to “Finding Nemo,” and won the César Award, the national film award of France, for Best Film Music.



Top stories in Stage

Sweeney’s second act: Spokane-born ‘SNL’ alum relaunches her Hollywood career

Ten years ago, Julia Sweeney dropped out of Hollywood. After four seasons on “Saturday Night Live,” two acclaimed stage monologues, “God Said ‘Ha!’” and “Letting Go of God,” appearances on television and in movies, she and her daughter, Mulan, left Southern California and moved to Willmette, a suburb of Chicago, where her husband, a biophysicist, owns a business. The idea, she says in her latest one-woman show, “Older and Wider,” is that he would be the breadwinner. She could be the bread eater.