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Summer fire rules went into effect Sunday

FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2017, file photo, a firefighter holds a water hose while fighting a wildfire in Santa Rosa, Calif. Summer fire rules went into effect Sunday, lasting until Oct. 15. The regulations apply to the 13 million acres of private and state forestland in Washington. (Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP)
FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2017, file photo, a firefighter holds a water hose while fighting a wildfire in Santa Rosa, Calif. Summer fire rules went into effect Sunday, lasting until Oct. 15. The regulations apply to the 13 million acres of private and state forestland in Washington. (Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP)

Summer fire rules went into effect Sunday and will last until Oct. 15. The regulations apply to the 13 million acres of private and state forestland in Washington.

These regulations affect loggers, firewood cutters, land clearers, road builders, heavy equipment operators, off-road motorcyclists and others, according to a Department of Natural Resources news release.

“During fire season, people using motorized equipment in the woods must have approved spark arresters and follow fire safety precautions. In addition, those working in the woods must have fire prevention and extinguishing equipment in good working order at the job site and workers trained in proper use,” the release states.

The rules also prohibit cigarette smoking in forested areas roads, gravels pits or other clearings, and prohibit lighting fireworks on forestland.

 

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