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Idaho takes additional step to prevent spread of chronic wasting disease

At the truck weigh station north of Deer Park, wash., Jay Shepherd an assistant district biologist with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, takes teeth and tissue samples on whitetail buck shot by Andrew Waltnerof Auburn, Wash. (in back.) Idaho wildlife officials have taken additional steps to prevent chronic wasting disease from entering the Gem State by banning the import of deer, elk or moose carcasses from areas with documented cases of chronic wasting disease. (Colin Mulvany / The Spokesman-Review)
At the truck weigh station north of Deer Park, wash., Jay Shepherd an assistant district biologist with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, takes teeth and tissue samples on whitetail buck shot by Andrew Waltnerof Auburn, Wash. (in back.) Idaho wildlife officials have taken additional steps to prevent chronic wasting disease from entering the Gem State by banning the import of deer, elk or moose carcasses from areas with documented cases of chronic wasting disease. (Colin Mulvany / The Spokesman-Review)

Idaho wildlife officials have taken additional steps to prevent chronic wasting disease from entering the Gem State by banning the import of deer, elk or moose carcasses from areas with documented cases of chronic wasting disease.

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission approved the rule change on July 26, according to an Idaho Department of Fish and Game news release.

The fatal neurological disease which affects deer, elk and moose has not been found in Idaho.

The newly approved rule bans the “import into Idaho of the carcass or any part of a wild deer, elk, or moose from another state, province of Canada, or country (other than Canada) with any documented case of CWD.”

Exceptions to the rule include meat that is cut and wrapped; quarters or deboned meat that does not include brain or spinal tissue; hides without head; upper canine teeth; finished taxidermy; dried antlers; or cleaned and dried skulls.

The rule went into effect immediately.

Other CWD-related rule changes include banning the use of natural cervid (deer, elk, moose) urine for hunting big game and banning the import of live mule deer, white-tail deer and moose, with some exceptions made for existing rehabilitation facilities.


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