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Support local artists on First Friday, even though it’s Second Friday

Due to the holidays, this Second Friday is really First Friday. That means there is still time to make good on that resolution to support the arts and contribute to downtown’s vitality, just by showing up.

Head into the downtown Spokane Public Library to catch a cutting edge mixed media exhibition and mini-concert. Yep, both of those rad events are happening at the library. The visual arts portion of the evening is by local photographer Robert Lloyd and videographers Doug Dalton and DaShawn Bedford. The trio has just launched an exhibition on the library’s third floor titled “IF YOU REALLY KNEW ME, Stories of Survivors and Warriors,” in honor of Human Trafficking Awareness Month in Spokane. Lloyd’s photos of women survivors are on the walls, while Dalton and Bedford’s videos are accessible through an augmented reality app. Viewers can download the free application CherryPIX and then point their phones at images in the exhibition so videos appear “magically” in their hands. This collaborative project of The Alliance for Media Arts + Culture, The Spokane Human Rights Commission, Community-Minded Television, The Jonah Project and Spokane Arts Supply continues through Feb. 28. A future highlight will be a reception and panel discussion on Jan. 30 at 6 p.m.

Also on the third floor of the library this Second Friday will be a mini-concert by The Children of Atom. Jam out to the heavy metal, punk, thrash, space rock, funk and interstellar transmissions from ancient worlds that is this local band. Concert from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 906 W. Main Ave.

Cross the street from the library to make some connections at the Chase Gallery, in whatever form “connecting” means to you. “Connectivity Matters” is the title of the new group exhibition at the Chase, open now through March 29. Patrons who attend Friday’s reception can connect with some of the five local artists featured: Heidi Farr, Rachel Smith, Patrick Sullivan, Naoko Morisawa and Jacob Miller. Using collage and mixed media, these artists construct their own narratives through pieced-together fragments as they form their own connections with what matters. The Chase Gallery is located in the space outside City Council chambers in the lower level of City Hall. Reception 5 p.m to 8 p.m. at 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd.

If you missed painter Shana Smith’s reception last Friday for her powerful new show at the Kolva-Sullivan Gallery, “Perceptions of an Artist,” you get another chance. Her series of oil paintings of fierce women will mesmerize. Reception from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 115 S. Adams St. Next-door-neighbor Trackside Studio Ceramic Art Gallery will also be open for business with a closing reception for its successful “Cup of Joy” show.

Cross the river to support the newest First Friday venue, Maryhill Winery in Kendall Yards, as it commits to featuring different artists every month. For January, Maryhill has partnered with neighbor Marmot Art Space to display the “Best of Marmot,” including work from legendary painter Alfredo Arreguin, nationally admired Ruben Trejo, and prominent painter and mixed media artist Ric Gendron. These three artists make three great reasons to visit the tasting room. Oh, and there’s wine. Reception from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 1303 W. Summit Parkway.

Speaking of Marmot Art Space, the gallery will exhibit a new show by local painter Jim Dhillon. Contemplate Dhillon’s large abstractions on the walls of Marmot from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 1202 W. Summit Parkway.

Spokane Art School in the Garland District north of downtown will launch an old-school, black-and-white film photograph exhibition by Bill and Kathy Kostelec of Cherry Street Studios. “The Art of the Darkroom,” featuring images taken in the Easter Sierras, will open with an artists’ reception from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. today in the Spokane Art School Gallery at 811 W. Garland Ave.



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