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Public asked to comment on Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife land acquisitions

UPDATED: Fri., Jan. 12, 2018, 4:08 p.m.

Myles Heistad, left, and Scott Wolff hike the trail along the North Fork of Asotin Creek before buds have opened on trees and plants in the foothills of the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. The U.S. Forest Service is attempting to promote rural economies while simultaneously protecting ecosystems and watersheds with its revised forest plans covering more than 5 million acres of federal public land in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. (Rich Landers / The Spokesman-Review)
Myles Heistad, left, and Scott Wolff hike the trail along the North Fork of Asotin Creek before buds have opened on trees and plants in the foothills of the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. The U.S. Forest Service is attempting to promote rural economies while simultaneously protecting ecosystems and watersheds with its revised forest plans covering more than 5 million acres of federal public land in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. (Rich Landers / The Spokesman-Review)

CONSERVATION – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is asking for public comment on 9 proposed land acquisition projects throughout the state. The department will accept comments through Feb. 2, 2018.

Four sites are east of the Cascades, including ones in Ferry, Columbia and Asotin Counties. The Ferry County proposal would add 53 acres to the Sherman Creek Wildlife Area eliminating the need for an easement for access.

The Asotin county proposal would add 653 acres and will connect two pieces of state land in the Blue Mountains. The purchase would keep a migration corridor open for wildlife and provide access to hunting, hiking horseback riding, mountain biking and bird watching, according to the state’s online description.

To see a full description of all 9 projects visit: wdfw.wa.gov/lands/acquisitions.

The final purchase decision is made by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission, a citizen panel, according to a WDFW news release.

“This is an opportunity to comment on these proposals in the early stages of our strategic thinking,” said Cynthia Wilkerson, WDFW lands division manager in a news release. “We want to know what the public thinks about these projects before we move forward.”


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