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100 years ago in Spokane: Gonzaga announces third alumni killed in World War I effort

Louis P. Mutty, a “naval volunteer aviator,” died in a plane crash in Miami, apparently while in training, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on July 13, 1918. He was the third Gonzaga alumni who died in the World War I effort. The newspaper also reported that J.O. Peterson, arrested after he smashed the window of the United Jewelry Store and helped himself to the diamonds, confessed to five burglaries and one arson. (Spokesman-Review archives)
Louis P. Mutty, a “naval volunteer aviator,” died in a plane crash in Miami, apparently while in training, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on July 13, 1918. He was the third Gonzaga alumni who died in the World War I effort. The newspaper also reported that J.O. Peterson, arrested after he smashed the window of the United Jewelry Store and helped himself to the diamonds, confessed to five burglaries and one arson. (Spokesman-Review archives)

Gonzaga University “had added the third gold star to its service flag” – meaning, the third former Gonzaga student had died in wartime service.

The latest was Louis P. Mutty, a “naval volunteer aviator,” who died in a plane crash in Miami, apparently while in training. Mutty had attended Gonzaga’s high school for two years. The Gonzaga president said he was an athlete, a debater and “was very well-liked.”

The other two Gonzaga alums who gave their lives were Lt. Kremer Tuohey, who died in an accident in Vancouver, and Ray Mager, killed in action in France.

From the crime beat: J.O. Peterson, arrested after he smashed the window of the United Jewelry Store and helped himself to the diamonds, confessed to five burglaries and one arson.

Two of the burglaries were similar to the jewelry heist. He smashed the windows of two fur stores and made away with expensive fur coats.

He combined arson with burglary at a Manito Boulevard home the winter before. He broke into the house and absconded with a wagonload of loot, including chairs, rugs, mattresses and a vacuum cleaner. Then he set a fire to cover up the crime. The house was badly damaged.

Much of this loot was discovered during a search of Peterson’s home on 29th Avenue. When confronted with this evidence, Peterson “broke down and confessed.”


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