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Mass stabbing suspect summoned Boise police to jail before his attorneys intervened

Timmy Earl Kinner Jr., the man accused of stabbing nine people, including six children at Wylie Street Station apartments, appeared in court via video from the jail on Monday morning, July 16, 2018. The preliminary hearing was continued until Aug. 14. (Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman)
Timmy Earl Kinner Jr., the man accused of stabbing nine people, including six children at Wylie Street Station apartments, appeared in court via video from the jail on Monday morning, July 16, 2018. The preliminary hearing was continued until Aug. 14. (Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman)

The man accused of murdering a 3-year-old child and wounding eight others in a stabbing attack at a Boise apartment complex asked police to come to the Ada County Jail for a conversation last Friday.

Boise police spokeswoman Haley Williams said Timmy Kinner’s public defenders stopped the interview — but motions filed with the court after the incident indicate that his attorneys may be unsure of what transpired before they arrived. It’s unclear how they became aware of the interview, which they refer to in court documents as an “interrogation.”

Kinner, 30, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Ruya Kadir, who died two days after she was stabbed June 30. Kinner is also facing eight counts of aggravated battery and a use of deadly force enhancement.

“He reached out to Boise police,” Williams told the Statesman on Friday, declining to offer an explanation of how he contacted police. “(Officers) went down there with the intent of talking to him, but there was no communication.”

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SIGN UPDavid Smethers, one of those attorneys, on July 24 filed a motion to obtain information about the two Boise police detectives who were at the Ada County Jail during the 6 p.m. July 20 visit.

In their request to the court, they also sought all audio and video recordings made by police during that interaction, as well as “police reports, jail communications and information from other potential witnesses with knowledge concerning the ‘kite’ that precipitated the interrogation.”

The term “kite” is a jail term for written communication, such as a note or letter.

Smethers did not respond to a request for comment on Friday.

Kinner has asked to represent himself, but he has three public defenders: Smethers, Brian Marx and Daniel Lorello.

On July 24, Marx filed a motion with the court, providing notice that Kinner “heretofore asserted his Fifth Amendment right to silence and Sixth Amendment right to counsel, reiterates these rights herein, and places all persons on notice of the aforementioned rights have not been waived, and cannot be waived without counsel present.”

At Kinner’s last court hearing, when his attorneys tried to bar cameras from the courtroom, he told the judge that he thought it was “sabotage” that they would continue to be permitted to cover the proceedings.

His next court appearance is scheduled for Aug. 14.


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