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Spark Central nonprofit receives $100,000 grant

UPDATED: Wed., June 20, 2018, 10:24 p.m.

Brooke Matson is the executive director of Spark Central, a non-profit creative space in the Kendall Yards development. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)
Brooke Matson is the executive director of Spark Central, a non-profit creative space in the Kendall Yards development. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)

The Washington Women’s Foundation gave a $100,000 grant to Spark Central, a Spokane nonprofit, on Wednesday. The money will go toward teaching innovative technologies like programming, robotics and media in Spokane for low-income residents.

“It’s definitely the biggest grant we’ve ever gotten,” said Brooke Matson, Executive Director of Spark Central. “We’re honored to have the support of the Washington Women’s Foundation.”

The money will help increase staff capacity to build partnerships with organizations in the West Central neighborhood, according to a news release. The grant will help support the West Central Express, an after-school program that teaches kids how to write and build their own newspaper.

Spark Central competed with more than 70 other nonprofits in Washington for the grant. Over 2,600 people are members of Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Parkway.

The Washington Women’s Foundation is a Seattle-based organization established in 1995. It is comprised of 475 members and awards grants to nonprofit organizations that serve in the areas of arts and culture, education, environment, health and human services, according to its website.


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