Arrow-right Camera
Sports >  International sports

Sweden has a lot to be upset about after last-minute loss

Sweden players walk on the pitch at the end of the Group F match between Germany and Sweden at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Fisht Stadium in Sochi, Russia, Saturday, June 23, 2018. Germany won 2-1. (Frank Augstein / Associated Press)
Sweden players walk on the pitch at the end of the Group F match between Germany and Sweden at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Fisht Stadium in Sochi, Russia, Saturday, June 23, 2018. Germany won 2-1. (Frank Augstein / Associated Press)

SOCHI, Russia – A last-minute goal. A non-called penalty. A disrespectful celebration.

Sweden had a lot to be upset about when the final whistle blew on Saturday.

The Swedes were within seconds of holding defending champion Germany to a draw, and moving into good position to advance to the round of 16 at the World Cup, when Toni Kroos scored deep into stoppage time to give Germany a 2-1 come-from-behind victory.

“I’m sorry that we didn’t get at least one point,” Sweden coach Janne Andersson said. “But I’m not blaming anyone tactically or analyzing too much right now, there are so many emotions going around. This is probably the heaviest conclusion that I’ve experienced in my career.”

Kroos’ goal from a set piece came in the fifth and final minute of injury time. The draw would have kept Sweden ahead of Germany in Group F and needing only a draw against Mexico in the last match.

“It was just bad luck,” Sweden forward John Guidetti said. “Now we need to try to find a way to win the last match. In a few days we play again and we have to win it. It’s simple.”

Germany, which is tied with Sweden on points and goal difference, will play against South Korea in the final round.

“We still have an excellent opportunity to qualify,” Andersson said. “Now we have to clean up, tidy up after this game. We’re going to do that.”

The Swedes were leading Germany at halftime thanks to Ola Toivonen’s goal in the 32nd minute at Fisht Stadium. They felt they could have been ahead even earlier if the referee had called a penalty when Marcus Berg appeared to be fouled inside the area with a clear chance to score. There was no formal video review called for.

“If we have the (VAR) system, it’s very unfortunate that he (the referee) can feel so secure in the moment that he doesn’t go and have a look at the situation,” Andersson said.

He and the Swedish players said they also couldn’t understand why Germany decided to celebrate near their bench.

“You shouldn’t celebrate in front of our bench the way they did, that’s disrespectful,” Guidetti said. “You can celebrate with your own fans. Don’t celebrate in front of our bench like that. That’s why they apologized, because they knew they did something wrong.”

Andersson said he was “very annoyed” by seeing the Germany team “running in our direction and rubbing it in our faces by making gestures.”

“We fought hard for 95 minutes,” he said. “And when the final whistle blows, you shake hands.”


Subscribe to The Spokesman-Review's sports newsletter

Get the day's top sports headlines and breaking news delivered to your inbox by subscribing here.

There was a problem subscribing you to the newsletter. Double check your email and try again, or email webteam@spokesman.com

You have been successfully subscribed!


Top stories in International sports

Anthony Joshua stops Alexander Povetkin in 7th round, keeps heavyweight titles

UPDATED: 4:59 p.m.

Anthony Joshua retained his IBF, WBO and WBA heavyweight titles with a seventh-round stoppage of Alexander Povetkin at Wembley Stadium. Joshua, who fought with a suspected broken nose from the second round, sent Povetkin to the canvas midway through the seventh and was unloading a flurry of punches before the referee stepped in to end the fight.