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Wednesday, December 12, 2018  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Idaho

Idaho high school bans backpacks following threats

UPDATED: Tue., March 6, 2018, 11:43 a.m.

Moses Chez, center, a junior at Hazleton Area High School, carries a backpack as he arrives at school in Hazle Township, Pa. Monday, March 5, 2018. Caldwell High School in southwest Idaho has implemented a policy barring students from bringing backpacks to school, citing safety reasons. (Ellen F. O'Connell / AP)
Moses Chez, center, a junior at Hazleton Area High School, carries a backpack as he arrives at school in Hazle Township, Pa. Monday, March 5, 2018. Caldwell High School in southwest Idaho has implemented a policy barring students from bringing backpacks to school, citing safety reasons. (Ellen F. O'Connell / AP)

CALDWELL, Idaho (AP) – A high school in southwest Idaho has implemented a policy barring students from bringing backpacks to school.

The Idaho Press-Tribune reports Caldwell High School announced the backpack ban Monday, citing safety reasons for bringing the policy forward.

According to the school, students will be allowed to bring small bags and binders to class. Athletic bags will be required to be stored with physical education teachers or left in the students’ cars.

Superintendent Shalene French says officials this week will consider implementing similar polices at other district schools.

The policy comes after police recently investigated threats at four area schools.

Classes were canceled for a day last month at Caldwell High School following a threat.

 

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