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MLB to Cubs’ Ben Zobrist: Stop wearing black cleats

Chicago Cubs first baseman Ben Zobrist plays in place of the injured Anthony Rizzo during the team's baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Wrigley Field in Chicago. Major League Baseball has warned Zobrist against wearing black cleats. Zobrist posted a letter from the league office on Instagram saying the cleats he wore May 2 against Colorado violated the collective bargaining agreement. MLB says they must be at least 51 percent blue, the Cubs' color, and warned he could be fined and disciplined if he doesn't comply. Zobrist says he has worn black cleats for day games at Wrigley Field the past two years to honor the game's past. (John Starks / AP)
Chicago Cubs first baseman Ben Zobrist plays in place of the injured Anthony Rizzo during the team's baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Wrigley Field in Chicago. Major League Baseball has warned Zobrist against wearing black cleats. Zobrist posted a letter from the league office on Instagram saying the cleats he wore May 2 against Colorado violated the collective bargaining agreement. MLB says they must be at least 51 percent blue, the Cubs' color, and warned he could be fined and disciplined if he doesn't comply. Zobrist says he has worn black cleats for day games at Wrigley Field the past two years to honor the game's past. (John Starks / AP)

CHICAGO – Major League Baseball has warned Ben Zobrist of the Chicago Cubs against wearing black cleats.

Zobrist posted a letter from the league office on Instagram saying the cleats he wore May 2 against Colorado violated the collective bargaining agreement. MLB says they must be at least 51 percent blue – the Cubs’ color – and warned he could be fined and disciplined if he doesn’t comply.

Zobrist says he has worn black cleats for day games at Wrigley Field the past two years to honor the game’s past. He says he was inspired watching highlights of greats such as Ernie Banks and Stan Musial in the 1950s and 1960s.

Zobrist says feedback from fans has been positive. He questioned why the league is enforcing the rule now.

Cleveland pitcher Mike Clevinger recently got a letter from MLB warning him against further wearing of his tie-dye cleats.