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Tuesday, December 11, 2018  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Idaho

Woman connected to Colfax homicide appears in court

UPDATED: Wed., Oct. 3, 2018, 10:15 p.m.

Ashley D. Myers checks out the gallery at her first appearance on murder charges Monday in Whitman County Court. (Steve Hanks / Lewiston Tribune)
Ashley D. Myers checks out the gallery at her first appearance on murder charges Monday in Whitman County Court. (Steve Hanks / Lewiston Tribune)

Whitman County Superior Court Judge Gary Libey imposed a $1 million surety bond Monday for Ashley Myers, the 30-year-old woman arrested on Colfax Airport Road on Friday night in connection to the death of a 55-year-old Coeur d’Alene man.

Myers made her initial court appearance Monday.

She was arrested after law enforcement personnel found a man dead in a vehicle she was driving Friday night, according to a Whitman County Sheriff’s Office news release.

The man found inside the vehicle off Colfax Airport Road was identified Sunday morning by the WCSO as Kenneth L. Allen.

Allen’s body was found inside a vehicle on Colfax Airport Road near the intersection of State Route 26 at about 6:45 p.m. after deputies responded to a report of an agitated woman allegedly waving a firearm at a vehicle.

When law enforcement personnel arrived on scene, they found Myers, a transient whose last known address is believed to be in Kirkland, Wash., near the side of the road carrying a baseball bat and acting agitated, the release stated.

Myers also allegedly made statements indicating she intentionally shot the man in the vehicle, according to the release.

Sheriff Brett Myers said his office wants to make sure the information it has attained and the statements she provided are consistent.

Deputies also allegedly found a loaded handgun and a substantial amount of methamphetamine outside the vehicle, according to the release.

The sheriff said the handgun recovered is believed to be the one used Friday night. He said the firearm does not belong to the suspect, and the sheriff’s office is working to track down the previous owner or the original purchaser of the weapon.

He said Ashley Myers and Allen knew each other, but the sheriff’s office is trying to determine the extent of the relationship.

“There was a relationship of some sorts because we believe they had been traveling together for about three weeks,” the sheriff said.

The sheriff’s office and the county coroner are actively investigating the case.

“Our job right now is to make sure we thoroughly investigate this case and get all the evidence we can,” the sheriff said.

Myers faces charges of second-degree murder and possession of a controlled substance. If convicted of the potential offenses, Myers could face life in prison, Libey said.

Whitman County Senior Deputy Prosecutor Merritt Decker told the court Myers does not have a history of committing significant crimes, adding she has no felonies. He said she does have three convictions for violating protection orders and that there is a good chance Myers would not appear in court if released. Libey and Decker said the nature of the offense gave them reason to believe she could pose a danger to the community, which is partly why Libey imposed the bond.

Steve Martonick, a Pullman criminal defense attorney, will represent Myers.

Myers’ next court appearance is set for 10 a.m. Friday at the Whitman County Courthouse. The state has until 3 p.m. Thursday to file charges.


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