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Tuesday, December 11, 2018  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Idaho

Crews seek missing Nezperce woman

UPDATED: Mon., Oct. 8, 2018, 10:08 a.m.

Connie Johnson (Lewiston Tribune)
Connie Johnson (Lewiston Tribune)

Search efforts are underway for Nezperce woman, Connie Johnson, and Maryland man Terrence Woods.

Johnson, who is 76, was reported missing in the Fog Mountain area. The last time someone communicated with Connie Johnson was on Tuesday, according to the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office.

Woods, a 27-year-old man, was reported missing on Friday after he became separated from the film crew he was working with, according to Associated Press. The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office says Woods was last seen near the Penman Mine in the Orogrande area.

Johnson was the cook at a hunting camp up the Selway River in the Fog Mountain area near Big Rock.

When other members of her party arrived Friday, they were unable to locate Johnson or her dog, Ace.

Searchers with the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office, Idaho Fish and Game, the Clearwater County Dog Team, the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Air Force and Back County Rescue Helicopter are assisting in the searches.

The sheriff’s office is also looking for information on a Jose Mendez-Morales, a 42-year-old Tacoma, Washington resident who was traveling to Elk City, Idaho. Officials say no one has heard from him since Sept. 25.


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