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Opinion

Unity versus diversity

Spokane’s Unity in the Community event theme this year was “Our Diversity is Our Strength.” Wrong. It contradicts America’s national motto, “E Pluribus Unum,” meaning “Out of Many, One” adopted by the Continental Congress in 1776 to signify the united colonies. As our country evolved through immigration and inclusion of different ethnic and racial groups, it became the theme of assimilation into American culture. Think of alloyed metal that combines various elements into a stronger solid, not edible “fruit salad.”

Multiculturalism is inherently antithetical to American culture because it focuses on past cultural origins: the remnants of disparate identities. It is literally a backward way of moving American society forward.

Look, I grew up as an “Army brat” in the ‘50s and ‘60s in the first multiracial, multiethnic American communities: military bases. We were children of different races and ethnicities but one culture: American. We were not “multicultural.” Not even our parents’ ranks divided us. So spare me the rabid, reflexive, “racist” retorts.

Unity in the Community’s “History” web page even records, “Unity is a statement that represents ‘we are all in this together.’ ” Now there’s a theme. Our unity is our strength, not diversity. E Pluribus Unum.

Bob Strong

Spokane

 

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