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Wednesday, April 24, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Business

Starbucks turns to solar energy to power its Texas stores

UPDATED: Fri., April 19, 2019, 5:24 p.m.

FILE - This Saturday, March 24, 2018, file photo, shows a sign at a Starbucks in the U.S. Starbucks is expanding its delivery service and aims to offer it at nearly one-fourth of its U.S. company-operated coffee shops. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File) ORG XMIT: NYSB182 (Gene J. Puskar / AP)
FILE - This Saturday, March 24, 2018, file photo, shows a sign at a Starbucks in the U.S. Starbucks is expanding its delivery service and aims to offer it at nearly one-fourth of its U.S. company-operated coffee shops. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File) ORG XMIT: NYSB182 (Gene J. Puskar / AP)
By Maria Halkias Dallas Morning News

Starbucks is investing in solar farms across Texas as part of an effort to save $50 million annually in utility costs over the next 10 years.

Two completed, 10-megawatt Texas solar farms owned by Cypress Creek Renewables in Wharton, Texas, and Blossom, Texas, already are providing power for 360 of its more than 1,000 stores in the state, including Dallas-Fort Worth.

Also, Starbucks is investing in six new Cypress Creek solar farms in Texas, representing 50 megawatts of solar energy. In total, the portfolio of eight projects announced last week will reduce carbon usage by 101.000 tons per year. Starbucks said that’s the equivalent of planting nearly 2.5 million trees.

Starbucks didn’t break out its solar investment in Texas, but said it has spent more than $140 million over the past two years toward renewable energy development.

The past 10 years, the company said renewable energy and other green efforts has saved it about $30 million in annual operating costs.

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