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Wednesday, April 24, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Spokane

Grant enables Hutton Settlement to replace sewer lines

The Northern Pacific Railway locomotive bell from Engine 109  sits on the Hutton Settlement grounds in Spokane Valley, Wash. The Hutton Settlement received a $152,000 grant from the Vancouver-based M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust for replacement of more than 2,000 feet of exterior sewer lines that serve the campus, including the administration building and four cottages. (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)
The Northern Pacific Railway locomotive bell from Engine 109 sits on the Hutton Settlement grounds in Spokane Valley, Wash. The Hutton Settlement received a $152,000 grant from the Vancouver-based M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust for replacement of more than 2,000 feet of exterior sewer lines that serve the campus, including the administration building and four cottages. (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)

The Hutton Settlement Children’s Home recently upgraded some of its aging infrastructure with a grant provided by the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust.

The $152,000 grant from the Vancouver-based M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust funded replacement of more than 2,000 feet of exterior sewer lines that serve the campus, including the administration building and four cottages.

The Hutton Settlement was grappling with the possibility of an emergency shutdown if the aging sewer lines were to collapse and, by replacing them, it addresses a critical infrastructure need on campus, according to a news release.

“Like many nonprofits, our budgets prioritize programs and services,” said Chud Wendle, executive director of Hutton Settlement. “This support from the Murdock Charitable Trust allows us much needed funding to keep our doors open and supporting at-risk youth.”

The Hutton Settlement, spanning more than 300 acres in Spokane Valley, provides a long-term alternative home for children in need. The minimum stay at Hutton Settlement is nine months and all of the children who come through the organization’s education program graduate from high school. An alumni program – including alumni dorms – ensures children have a support network after graduating.

“When children have stability, they can thrive,” said Steve Moore, executive director of the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust in a statement. “When children thrive, so do our neighborhoods and communities. By modernizing the infrastructure on campus, the Hutton Settlement can better focus on providing stability to at-risk children and their families at a time when it’s most needed.”

The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust, created by the estate of Melvin “Jack” Murdock, the co-founder of Tektronix, provides grants to organizations in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington.

The Murdock Trust invests in projects supporting arts and culture, health and human services, education and scientific research endeavors.

Since 2011, the Murdock Trust has invested $107 million in more than 600 grants across Washington state. This includes recent awards to Treehouse, serving children in foster care; LifeWorks, to support vocational programs for teens with disabilities; and several Boys & Girls Clubs.

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