Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Wednesday, June 19, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Clear Night 56° Clear
News >  Spokane

100 years ago in Spokane: New company making cartoons, documentaries and movies

Alexander Film Co., specializing in industrial movies (promotional documentaries) and animated cartoons, was operating in Spokane, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on June 7, 1919 (Spokesman-Review archives)
Alexander Film Co., specializing in industrial movies (promotional documentaries) and animated cartoons, was operating in Spokane, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on June 7, 1919 (Spokesman-Review archives)

A “completely equipped commercial motion picture plant” was now operating in Spokane.

It was the Alexander Film Co., specializing in industrial movies (promotional documentaries) and animated cartoons.

This was not to be confused with the Washington Motion Picture Corp., the Spokane studio launched by Tyrone Power, which was already in receivership after one year.

The Alexander Film Co., was thriving so far. It was making films for local businesses throughout the Northwest, including the Sperry Flour Mill and the Modern Tractor School. The flour mill movie was intended to be shown as a short subject in area movie houses and the tractor movie would be used in various ways to boost the school.

The company also proposed to make short scenic movies of the region.

“Spokane could not possibly hope for a more effective form of propaganda,” said the company’s owner.

This was the “only movie plant of its kind in the Northwest.”

From the bridge beat: Two new bridges were proposed in Spokane, one over Latah (Hangman) Creek at the foot of Riverside Avenue, and one over the Spokane River at Ash Street.

The Latah bridge was essentially assured when the City Council approved a plan for a $24,000 span. The Ash Street bridge was still in the proposal stage, and the price tag was estimated at $350,000. Proponents said it would relieve congestion on the Monroe Street bridge and give better connections to areas on the city’s west side.

From the cafe beat: Spokane’s cafe owners raised prices on most menu items in the aftermath of an agreement to give one day off per week to cooks and bakers — without cutting their weekly wage.

Pie, milk and coffee would now cost 10 cents. A “merchant’s lunch” would cost 5 cents. French pastry would cost 15 cents. The price increases ranged from 15 percent to 100 percent.

Subscribe to the Morning Review newsletter

Get the day’s top headlines delivered to your inbox every morning by subscribing to our newsletter.

You have been successfully subscribed!
There was a problem subscribing you to the newsletter. Double check your email and try again, or email webteam@spokesman.com