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Sunday, May 26, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Spokane

100 years ago in Spokane: Seventh-graders build sidewalk, drinking fountains, basement floors at Hamilton school

Seventh-grade boys in manual training classes at Hamilton and Whitman schools installed a 100-foot long sidewalk at Hamilton school, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on May 16, 1919. (Spokesman-Review archives)
Seventh-grade boys in manual training classes at Hamilton and Whitman schools installed a 100-foot long sidewalk at Hamilton school, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on May 16, 1919. (Spokesman-Review archives)

Seventh-grade boys in manual training classes at Hamilton and Whitman schools installed a 100-foot-long sidewalk at Hamilton school.

“The boys are very interested in the outdoor work and take to the work fine,” said C.E. Rusman, supervisor of manual training in the grade schools.

Students in the classes also were installing concrete floors in two basement rooms at Hamilton, 545 E. Wellesley Ave. (now home to Zion Faith Assembly), and had made concrete drinking fountains, steps and bird fountains.

From the cop beat: Spokane County Sheriff George Reid warned drivers that his “speed cop” Clarence Gorham was setting up traps to catch drivers speeding or violating license plate regulations or other rules.

“Don’t try to get by with a license card of your own manufacture,” the Spokane Daily Chronicle warned. “It must be one issued by the state auditor or his agents.”

“We are going to enforce the motor laws,” Reid said. “This is fair warning.”

From the fan beat: Some prominent Spokane residents were finagling ways to witness the upcoming heavyweight championship boxing fight between Jess Willard and Jack Dempsey. The match was set for July 4 in Toledo, Ohio.

Henry Solomon, a billiard star, already snagged a “ring side cushion,” the Chronicle reported.

Some retail businessmen were trying to schedule their annual buying trips back East to sneak in a stop in Toledo.

“What I’d like to do is to get a number of Spokane men interested enough in the proposition to get a car from Spokane to Toledo and get some rates from the railroad,” said Frank Smith. “I’d like to talk it over with any fans here who can see a possibility of getting east at that time.”

From the court beat: Testimony was concluded in the civil case of Detective Lee Markwood who was suing F.K. McBroom, who had taken receivership of the Washington Motion Picture Corporation. The failed movie company was located at Minnehaha Park.

Markwood’s son died after contracting rabies from an Alaskan husky belonging to an actor working for the studio.

Jim Kershner in on sabbatical.

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