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Wednesday, July 24, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Spokane

100 Years Ago in Spokane: Memorial for Navy men

Groups planning to hold a memorial service for the Navy’s fallen had arranged to have flowers scattered from the Monroe Street Bridge over the Spokane River and a gun salute by an honor guard. (S-R archives)
Groups planning to hold a memorial service for the Navy’s fallen had arranged to have flowers scattered from the Monroe Street Bridge over the Spokane River and a gun salute by an honor guard. (S-R archives)

On the Friday after Memorial Day, the United Naval Circle, the Ladies of the Grand Army of the Republic, the Sons of Veterans and surviving G.A.R. veterans were planning to hold a memorial service for the boys who lost their lives while serving their country in the Navy.

On the Monroe Street Bridge, flowers were to be scattered on the Spokane River and an honor guard was expected to fire a gun salute over the water.

Lewis and Clark grads head to UW, Washington State: A survey of graduating seniors from Lewis and Clark High School showed that the largest number of college-bound students, a total of 37, planned to go to the University of Washington. Twenty of the graduates planned to go to Washington State College. Ten were headed to Stanford and nine to the University of California.

The rest of the graduates were distributed in smaller numbers to colleges around the West, Midwest and East Coast. The newspaper listed the names of 28 graduates unsure of their plans for after graduation.

Employees take railway to court: The attorneys for the employees of the Spokane and Inland Empire Railway demanded to see the books of the railway that recently went into receivership. Attorneys for the company testified that the company didn’t have the money to pay the increased federal scale. The company was under federal control during the war, with minimum wages set by the government. Employees said money that could have been used to pay increased federal wage requirements was reinvested in the company. Practically every employee testified that the company appealed to their patriotism to stay with the company during the war.

Theaters will employ men once again: Manager J.W. Allender of the Majestic and Lyric Theaters announced that with the war now over, his movie houses would employ only men. Mr. Allender said that during the war, women were employed as ushers and other jobs, but he will try to give these jobs to returning soldiers. He said that the one exception to this rule will be at the cashier’s window, where a woman will be retained.

Jim Kershner is on sabbatical.

– Jesse Tinsley

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