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Sunday Spin: How to pick most important election ever?

If you haven’t heard this yet, sometime soon you will. A politician will proclaim this the Most Important Election in your life time.
Or in a generation. Or since World War II. They might say “of the century” but that’s really not much, because the century is only 12 years old, so they’ll probably substitute “of the last hundred years.”
But there will be pronouncements that this year’s election – for the White House, for Congress, for governor, for anything above dog catcher – is the Most Important Election for some time span that will make you sit up and take notice.
One doesn’t have to be the great Karnak to make this prediction. With the Republican National Convention next week and the Democratic National Convention the next, there will be no shortage of hyperbolic superlatives.
The Most Important Election – by which a candidate often means “because you can vote for me” – occurs without fail at a minimum of every four years. At the risk of sounding as old as Methuselah, I can’t recall a presidential election reaching back to 1972 in which at least the candidate of the out-party didn’t make that claim.
So where does 2012 land on the important-ometer of the last 40 years?
To read the rest of this post, go inside the blog.

McMorris Rodgers agrees to two debates

U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers has decided to debate her Democratic opponent twice before the November election.

After this month's primary, Democrat Rich Cowan challenged McMorris Rodgers to debate him in each of the 5th Congressional District's 10 counties. After her town hall meeting on Thursday in Spokane, McMorris Rodgers said that she responded to Cowan in writing by agreeing to his request - but only if Washington's Democratic U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell agrees to debate her Republican rival in all 39 of Washington's counties.

So, in orther words, her answer was no — though it's worth noting that her decision to debate twice is twice as many as she agreed to in 2010.

Romney on WA ballot, judge rules

OLYMPIA — Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan will be on Washington’s presidential ballot this fall because the Republican Party meets the rules for being a major party in the state, a Thurston County Superior Court judge ruled this morning.

Judge Thomas McPhee denied a request by the state Libertarian Party to keep Romney’s name off the ballot, which argued Republicans hadn’t complied with rules for nominating Dino Rossi as the official GOP nominee in the 2010 Senate race during their state convention that year.

Republicans were split between Rossi and Clint Didier, who was popular with Tea Party elements of the GOP, and didn’t get a chance to nominate either at their convention. When Rossi qualified for the general election in the Top 2 primary, the party’s State Central Committee endorsed him and all other Republican candidates who made it through the primary.

Political parties have control over selecting the candidates they will support, McPhee said in denying the motion to keep Romney’s name off the ballot. The state also has a valid argument that Republicans are a major party based on the results of the 2008 presidential election, he added.

The decision won’t be appealed, J. Mills, an attorney for the Libertarian Party, said. But it could make minor parties change their strategy for 2016… .

To read the rest of this item, click here to go inside the blog.

Baumgartner: No apology for expletive

OLYMPIA — U.S. Senate candidate Mike Baumgartner said Wednesday he never apologized to a Seattle reporter for suggesting the reporter "(bleep)" himself, even though his campaign released a statement Tuesday quoting the Spokane Republican doing just that.

"It went out before I'd seen it," Baumgartner said of the press release that contains a direct quote of him offering an apology to Josh Feit of PubliCola. Later that day, Baumgartner told a Seattle television station he wasn't apologizing.

Campaign staffers said there was an "internal glitch" in communication in preparing the press release.

In a phone interview with The Spokesman-Review, Baumgartner attempted to clarify the on-again, off-again apology to Feit over an e-mail the candidate sent the reporter on Monday night after a question-and-answer item appeared on the Seattle-based blog.

The item was an expansion of Baumgartner's position on abortion for rape victims, coming on the heels of a Missouri Senate candidate's comments over the weekend that women rarely get pregnant from a "legitimate rape." Baumgartner called U.S. Rep. Todd Akin's comments ignorant and inexcusable, as he had in an earlier press release issued that day. The blog item noted that Baumgartner also opposes abortion in cases of rape. He said he believes rape victims should be treated with compassion and empathy, but that life begins at conception so he opposes abortion on those grounds. Extremists on the abortion rights side of the debate are not questioned about their positions on late term abortions or blocking parental notification, he added.

The article went on to quote Baumgartner as saying his campaign isn't about the culture wars but about jobs and ending the war in Afghanistan. That tracked with comment in the campaign's press release on the Akin comment, that he wished everyone would "call a truce in the culture wars and get back to finding real solutions needed to balance our budget and create real job growth."

Late Monday, Baumgartner sent Feit an e-mail with a picture of him standing next to a Navy SEAL who had recently been killed in Afghanistan. He suggested Feit "take a good look and then go (bleep) yourself", using an all-too-common Anglo-Saxon word.

Feit posted the photo and e-mail's contents on PubliCola.

Baumgartner said he considered the e-mail personal and a followup to an ongoing personal discussion he'd had with Feit about Afghanistan. Feit wrote that's not the case, that the Afghan war comments came during an on-the-record conversation about the Akin situation, which was "the news of the day."

 By late Tuesday afternoon, the Baumgartner campaign was clearly scrambling to put out an official response to the back and forth. His spokeswoman sent out a press release quoting Baumgartner as apologizing to Feit. It also said he believed the news media don't want to talk about the men and women being killed in Afghanistan and Cantwell's stance on the war.

Baumgartner later told KIRO-TV on camera that he wasn't apologizing, and that Feit had it coming.

Spokeswoman Jami Herring said Wednesday the campaign discussed a range of responses that included an apology for the strong language. Asked if Baumgartner saw the press release with a direct quote from him before it went out, she replied "We thought he had, apparently he did not. We got the quote wrong."

Herring and Campaign manager Dan Bisbee called the press release "an internal glitch."

In an interview Wednesday, Baumgartner repeated his contention that the news media isn't spending enough time holding members of Congress from both parties responsible for backing poor strategy on the war in Afghanistan. He believes the initial decision to invade Afghanistan after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks was correct, but more recent expansions of the war are the wrong strategy and the United States should withdraw troops from the country as soon as possible.

Baumgartner to Publicola: Go (bleep) yourself

U.S. Senate candidate Mike Baumgartner thinks too much attention is being paid to comments by another Republican candidate running for another Senate seat in another state.

As noted yesterday, Baumgartner, who is running against U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, called the comments of Todd Akin ignorant and inexcusable. This was after Akin, who is running against U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri, defended his stance against abortion for cases of rape by telling a St. Louis radio station that women rarely get pregnant from a "legitimate rape" because their bodies have a means to "shut down the whole thing."

His campaign even put out a press release detailing his views on why Akin's comments were insensitive, and suggested it was time to stop focusing on the culture wars and get back to substantive issues like the economy and fiscal problems.

Publicola, a Seattle-area political and public affairs blog, followed up and asked for further details on how Baumgartner's views differed from Akin's views, because they both oppose abortion for cases of rape and incest. The Spokane state senator provided them more details, but again said his campaign is not based around culture wars, and that's not why he's running against Cantwell. He's running on issues about the economy and ending the war in Afghanistan.

Later in the evening, Baumgartner — apparently unhappy with the follow up — sent the writer Josh Feit a picture of picture of a friend who recently died in Afghanistan. He suggested Feit "take a good look, and then go (bleep) yourself." (This word is used freely by today's teenagers as a noun, a verb, an adjective, an interjection and even a conjunction, but this blog is still run by a family newspaper, so we don't print it.)

This afternoon, Baumgartner's campaign released a statement in which he said he thought the e-mail to Feit was personal, but nonetheless apologized "for my strong language." He reiterated criticism that the news media aren't talking about ways to end the war or Cantwell's support of it.

For a copy of the statement, click here to go inside the blog.

McMorris Rodgers gets speaking part at GOP convention

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers is doing about everything she possibly can to make sure Mitt Romney gets elected.

She's his campaign co-chairwoman for Washington state. She's is the campaign liaison to the House of Representatives.  She's a co-chairwoman of Farmers and Ranchers for Mitt. She's a co-chairwoman of Women for Mitt.

Later this month, she'll get to make a prime-time pitch for Romney at the Republican National Convention.

McMorris Rodgers is on the list of speakers announced today for the first day of the convention. She'll be following House Speaker John Boehner and U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky,  and preceeding Mike Huckabee, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley and Ann Romney. Announced theme for the night: We can do better.

The evening schedule starts at 7:45 p.m. Eastern, so that's 4:45 p.m. Pacific.

Earlier in the day, viewers can see the "roll call of the states" for president. That's when people in funny hats stand at a microphone and say things like "Madam Chairman, the great state of West Dakota, home of a buncha things you never heard of but we think are damn special so we're going to take this opportunity to list them all…cast their six and one-third votes for the next president of the United States Mitt Romney, 2 and one-third votes for the other next president of the United States Ron Paul, and one-third vote for the bartender at our Holiday Inn who made the best margaritas we ever had last night."

T-Mobile kicks in to Ref. 74 campaign

OLYMPIA — T-Mobile dialed in support of the ballot measure that would legalize same-sex marriage in Washington state.

The cellphone service is giving $25,000 to the main campaign to pass Referendum 74, Washington United for Marriage.

The company said in a press release it was part of "a long-standing focus on creating an inclusive workplace environment for our employees."

It's a big donation, but not among the top 10 for the yes campaign, which has about $5.8 million with the T-Mobile money added in.

Preserve Marriage Washington, the primary no campaign, has slightly under $440,000.

Mo. rape comment ripples into Wa.

Waves from a comment by a Missouri politician Sunday that women are rarely pregnant from a "legitimate rape" rippled across country to Washington state today, with fellow Republican Senate candidate Mike Baumgartner calling it ignorant and Democrats trying to tie a link to Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers.

U.S. Rep. Todd Akin, who won a primary for the right to challenge U.S. Claire McCaskill in Missouri, stepped in it Sunday during a radio interview. According to an Associated Press report, he was asked if he would support abortion for a woman who was raped, and replied: "It seems to me, first of all, from what I understand from doctors, that's really rare. If it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down."

He later  said in a statement he misspoke and insisted he has "deep empathy for the thousands of women who are raped and abused each year."

But some Republicans were already calling for him to get out of the race, GOP presidential nominee-in-waiting Mitt Romney termed the comments offensive and other candidates were quick to follow suit.

Among them was Baumgartner, who this morning issued a statement that the comments were inexcusable: "To belittle the trauma rape victims go through is extremely offensive and I am horrified that he would show such little empathy."

He also suggested candidates "call a truce on the culture wars" and go back to talking about the economy and fiscal problems.

That's probably not going to  happen soon. Sen. Maria Cantwell's campaign quickly fired back that Baumgartner signed on to a Spokane County GOP platform that defined life as stretching from conception to natural death, and said he would make an exception for abortion in cases in which a woman's life is in danger but not an exception for rape cases.

Meanwhile, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee was trying to tie Akin's comments around McMorris Rodgers' neck, saying they co-sponsored the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act, which as originally written tried to change an exclusion in the law from rape to "forcible rape." That suggests that some kinds of rape and incest are consensual and health care could be restricted accordingly, the group said. Wouldn't be surprised if the DCCC was sending out a cookie-cutter press release in most of the bill's 227 co-sponsors.

Lawsuit would keep Romney off Washington ballot

OLYMPIA — A political party is seeking to keep Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan off Washington's Nov. 6 general election ballot. And it's not the Democratic Party.

The Libertarian Party of Washington argues in a lawsuit filed this week in Thurston County Superior Court that the GOP, like the LPWA, is not a "major party" under state law but a "minor party." This isn't an instance of the parties comparing various parts of their anatomy, but a distinction in law that decides how candidates for president make it on the ballot.

J. Mills, a former state LPWA chairman and the attorney who filed the lawsuit, said it's a matter of making everyone play by the same rules.

Kirby Wilbur, state GOP chairman, calls the lawsuit "a silly nuisance" and has no doubt that Romney and Ryan will be on the ballot. . .

To read the rest of this item, click here to go inside the blog.

Local GOP opening ‘Victory Center’

Spokane area Republicans are apparently pooling their resources for the fall campaigns to open a "Victory Center" where GOP candidates and their supporters, from the presidential level on down the ballot, can set up.

U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers said statewide candidates and campaigns will run their Eastern Washington operations out of the center, to "reach out to voters and to make certain Republican voters mail in their ballots."

They're holding a grand opening at 5 p.m. Monday at the center, which is in the Pier 1 Building, off Division oat 111 West North River Drive.

Baumgartner picks up ‘D’ endorsement

OLYMPIA — With the primary over for everything except the certification, losers are apt to be endorsing winners who will move on to the general.

So it's no surprise that U.S. Senate candidate Art Coday, who finished third, has endorsed fellow Republican Mike Baumgartner in his run against incumbent Democrat Maria Cantwell. Republicans endorsing other Republicans, or Democrats endorsing other Democrats don't qualify as news, even in the dog days of summer.

But Baumgartner picked up the endorsement of another of his primary rivals. Democrat Timmy (Doc) Wilson.

Wilson finished fourth. He ran on what some people would consider a "progressive" platform, calling for an immediate end to wars and higher taxes on the upper income segments, more investment in infrastructure and technology. This week he endorsed Baumgartner, who doesn't share his views on taxes, over fellow Democrat Cantwell, saying he thought the challenger would do a better job of working with both parties to get things done.

So that's good news for Baumgartner. Bad news: adding Coday's votes and Wilson's votes to his total — and all the rest of the challengers, for that matter — still leaves Baumgartner about 150,000 votes behind Cantwell.

3 NIC Trustees Face Election

The last day candidates can file declaration/petition of candidacy forms with the local clerk of the North Idaho College district for the three open positions on the NIC Board of Trustees is 5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31. Individuals who miss this deadline will not be placed on the ballot. They may file as a declared write-in candidate if they file a declaration of intent no later than 5 p.m. on Sept. 21. NIC is governed by a five-member board of trustees elected at large from within Kootenai County for staggered terms. Seat A, Seat B, and Seat C currently held by Judy Meyer, Mic Armon, and Ron Vieselmeyer (pictured) respectively, will appear on this year’s general election ballot during Idaho’s general election on Nov. 6. All positions are four-year terms. More below.

Question: Do you expect a last-minute ticket of Republican hardliners to file in attempt to politicize yet another nonpartisan local government board?

Creepy or cute? Shea posts pic of himself standing on opponent’s property

State Rep. Matt Shea, R-Spokane Valley, is refusing to remove a picture of his election opponent's home from his Facebook page.

Amy Biviano, the Democrat who is challenging Shea's election bid, said Friday that she left voicemails with Shea and with Spokane County Republican Party Chairman Matthew Pederson requesting that the photo be pulled but hasn't received a call back. She said she and others also have posted comments on Shea's Facebook page asking that the photo (left) be removed, but those comments have been deleted.

Late last week Shea posted the picture of himself standing on Biviano's property along with the comment: "I wanted to give a special thanks to all of those in the newest 4th District Precinct ….Thank you all for the overwhelming show of support, what a great neighborhood! Oh…and that's my opponent's house in the background. =)"

His post listed the intersection near where she lives.

Mapping the vote: Another way to look at the U.S. Senate race in Spokane

U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell easily finished first in last week's state primary, and topped Republican challenger Mike Baumgartner in many Spokane County precincts, as the map below shows.

But when one considers the ABC vote — Anyone But Cantwell — she won fewer precincts, as the map above shows.

For a closer look at the map, click on the PDF version below.


Mapping the vote: One way to look at the U.S. Senate race in Spokane

U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell easily topped the field in last week's state primary, and finished on top in Spokane County, which is the home of her general election challenger, state Sen. Mike Baumgartner.

Using Monday's ballot report, here's a look at how Cantwell did against Baumgartner in Spokane County.

For a closer look, check out the PDF version of the map.


Mapping the vote: Another way to look at the 6th Dist race

Former state Rep. Dennis Dellwo came out on top in many of the precincts in last week's four-way contest for an open state House of Representatives seat.

But Republican Jeff Holy, who finished second overall and moves on to the general election against Democrat Dellwo, might have more to cheer about when one considers how the total GOP vote stacks up against Dellwo's total.

The winner of each precinct is in the map above. A map of Dellwo vs. the GOP field can be found in the post below.

For a closer look, click on the PDF version of the map.


Mapping the vote: One way to look at the 6th District House race

Former state Rep. Dennis Dellwo came out on top in many of the precincts in last week's four-way contest for an open state House of Representatives seat.

But Republican Jeff Holy, who finished second overall and moves on to the general election against Democrat Dellwo, might have more to cheer about when one considers how the total GOP vote stacks up against Dellwo's total.

A map of Dellwo vs. the GOP field can be foundin the map above.  A map of the winner of each precinct can be found in the post above.

For a closer look, click on the PDF version of the map.


Benn secures spot on November ballot; Snyder endorses Riccelli

Spokane City Councilman Jon Snyder ended his campaign for state House on Thursday and endorsed Marcus Riccelli in the November election.

Snyder conceded after the third day of counting in Tuesday's primary showed that Republican Tim Benn's hold on second place getting more secure.

Riccelli, a Democrat, was the top-vote getter in the race for an open House seat in Spokane's 3rd Legislative District. The top two candidates face each other in the general election.

The Spokane County Elections Office counted about 500 ballots in the race today. Out of the more than 24,000 ballots cast in the 3rd Legislative District, only about 1,500 are left to count.

In today's count, Benn's lead for second place over Democrat Snyder grew slightly to 426. His lead over former Spokane City Councilman Bob Apple, also a Democrat, increased to 565.

After the first day of counting, Benn, Snyder and Apple were within 100 votes.

The election's office won't resume counting until Monday.

2,000 votes left to count in tight Spokane House race

With only around 2,000 votes left count in Spokane's 3rd Legislative District, Republican Tim Benn nearly has a lock on a second-place finish to compete for a state House seat in the November election.

Democrat Marcus Riccelli easily topped the four other candidates running for the seat, but Benn and Democrats Bob Apple and Jon Snyder were within 100 votes of each other for the right to move on with Riccelli iin the general election after the first round of counting on Tuesday.

In Wednesday's count, Benn surged and now has a lead of more than 400 over Snyder and more than 500 over Apple. The third round of counting will be completed later today.

Mapping the vote: 3rd District House race

Marcus Riccelli is comfortably in first place in the 3rd District House race, but three candidates are bunched up in the race for second place and a spot on the general election ballot.

As this map shows, Riccelli owes his first place standing to doing well in the western and southern precincts of the district.  Bob Apple ran strong in the northeast portions of the district, which correspond closely to his old council district. Tim Benn won a few of his precincts big, and Jon Snyder was strongest in the precincts in or near his south Spokane Council District.

For a closer look at the map, check out the PDF file.


Looking ahead: 4th District House race

For candidates in a two-person primary like Republican Matt Shea and Democrat Amy Biviano, this week's election gives them a snapshot of how they are doing right now with voters.

This map shows the precincts that each won, and demonstrates that Shea piled up larger margins of victory in many of his precincts.

For a closer look, check out the PDF.


Looking ahead: 3rd District Senate race

For candidates in two-person primary races, like Democrat Andy Billig and Republican Nancy McLaughlin, the primary offers them a chance to see how they stack up, head to head, right now.

This map shows the margin of victory for each candidate in the 3rd Legislative District precincts. Billig owes his 19 point margin in part to the fact that he won some precincts with much higher vote totals than McLaughlin.

For more detail, check out the PDF.


Dellwo confident; Keller endorses Holy

Unlike the close battle for a central Spokane House seat, the other local legislative race in Tuesday's primary with more than two candidates came to a decisive conclusion early.

Democrat Dennis Dellwo, a former state representative, easily topped three Republicans to advance general election. He'll face Republican Jeff Holy, an attorney, who almost doubled the tally of third-place finisher Ben Oakley, a former aide to state Rep. Kevin Parker.

Despite his first-place finish, Dellwo faces a significant challenge in the district if Republicans unite behind Holy. More than half the voters in the 6th Legislative District voted for a GOP candidate in the race.

But Dellwo said Wednesday that he likes his chances.

"The experts tell me that when you have three formidable contenders on the other side, as we did, they believe I would be able to pick up between 6 and 8 percent," Dellwo said.

Thousands left to count in Spokane House race

About 24,000 people voted in Spokane's 3rd Legislative District in Tuesday's primary election, according to election statistics that include ballots received in today's mail.

So far, about 17,000 of those votes have been counted. That means the second-place battle for state House among Democrats Bob Apple and Jon Snyder and Republican Tim Benn to determine who will face Democrat Marcus Riccelli hinges on more than 7,000 uncounted votes.

The second round of counting will start at 3 p.m., Spokane County Elections Manager Mike McLaughlin said. New results will be posted after 5 p.m.

McKenna ahead of Inslee? In Spokane yes; statewide, no

An irate reader called this morning to ask what were we smoking last night at The Spokesman-Review that led us to report that Democrat Jay Inslee was ahead of Republican Rob McKenna in the governor's primary.

This is a smoke-free office, so the answer is "Nothing." He insisted he'd heard on the radio, and the television early this morning that the results are actually reversed, and that McKenna was ahead of Inslee. We checked the Secretary of State website, and the Associated Press lists, which should be the same sources that all news outlets are using.

Nope, we assured him. Right now, Inslee is ahead of McKenna. No, he insisted, the nice couple on the radio, whom he listens to every morning, must've got it right.

Not being up and listening to the radio at 5 a.m., we couldn't say for sure whether he'd mis-heard or the station misspoke. But here's one possibility:

If you click on the Spokane County election website, you get results for all the races, but only from this county. McKenna has a sizable lead. Perhaps that's what the folks on the radio and television were looking at.

If you click on the Secretary of State's website, you get the results for the whole state, and can find a map with county breakdowns. McKenna has most of the Eastern Washington counties, Inslee most of the Western Washington counties…and the lead statewide.

We still aren't smoking anything. Can't vouch for the folks on the radio or television.

Intriguing possibilities for Spokane House race

After an intense three-month campaign, the race for a state House seat representing central Spokane only revealed the first- and last-place finishers.

The three candidates in between will have to wait at least through the end of the week  – and perhaps through a round of recounting – to determine who will face top vote-getter Democrat Marcus Riccelli in November.

Two of the three possible challengers to Riccelli also are Democrats and offer intriguing general election matchups.

Former Spokane City Councilman Bob Apple, a Democrat and former Republican, appeals to some Republicans and even won the endorsement of the Spokane Home Builders Association during the primary. With a solid base of support in northeast Spokane, he could offer a formidable challenge to Riccelli – though he would have to massively step up his efforts to match Riccelli’s financial support and professional organization.

Current Spokane City Councilman Jon Snyder holds nearly identical views on the issues as Riccelli and is popular with the Democratic Party, but faltered as the party’s establishment fell in line behind Riccelli, who was Senate Majority Leader Lisa Brown’s choice. Republicans would struggle to choose between the two, and Snyder would have to successfully woo them to win.

Day care center co-owner Tim Benn, as a Republican and first-time candidate likely would have significant difficulty in a race against Riccelli, as shown in two-person races between Democrats and Republicans in the district, including Tuesday’s primary for state Senate between Democrat Andy Billig and Republican Nancy McLaughlin. Billig has a nearly 20 percentage point lead over McLaughlin, who has won big in her nonpartisan races for Spokane City Council.

Procrastinators note: 8 p.m. is ballot deadline

When that ballot came in the mail several weeks ago, some of you may have thought: "Oh, plenty of time."

And when those political commercials started coming hot and heavy during the Olympic games' opening ceremony, you may have looked toward the counter where that ballot sat and thought: "Oh, plenty of time."

And when the campaigns started calling asking you to mark your ballot for this candidate or the other, you may have hung up the phone thinking: "Oh, plenty of time."

Well, guess what? You are almost out of time.

8 p.m. today is the deadline for getting those ballots in. They must be deposited in a drop box, or mailed with today's postmark. To make sure it's postmarked, it might be best to take it to a Post Office. For a list of public libraries and other locations for Spokane County drop boxes, check inside the blog.

Oh, and if you forgot where you put the ballot, or threw it out with the junk mail, or maybe the dog ate it, and now you need another one, you can get that at a voter service center. Here's a list of voter service centers for Spokane County.


Downtown  Elections Office 1033 W Gardner Ave
Downtown STA Transit Plaza   701 W Riverside Ave
Northside  North Spokane Library   44 E Hawthorne Rd
South Hill  St. Mark’s Church    316 E 24th Ave
Spokane Valley  CenterPlace  2426 N Discovery Pl
West Plains   Cheney Library

610 First St

Still trying to decide among Apple, Benn, Oyler, Riccelli and Snyder?

Tuesday is the last chance to mail your Washington primary ballot. If you live in central Spokane and are having a hard time deciding who to choose among the five candidates for the position 1 House seat in the 3rd Legislative District, try studying their stances on 15 issues in the following links:

Bob Apple

Tim Benn

Morgan Oyler

Marcus Riccelli

Jon Snyder

And here are their responses to one of the questions The Spokesman-Review questionnaire:

8. Do you support the legalization of marijuana for adults, including for recreational purposes? If not, do you support the legalization of marijuana for medical use? How would you address the conflict that currently exists between state law allowing marijuana for medical use and federal law banning it?

Still trying to decide among Dellwo, Holy, Keller and Oakley?

Check out each 6th District House candidate's stance on 15 issues facing the state at the following links:

Dennis Dellwo

Jeff Holy

Larry Keller

Ben Oakley

And here are their responses to one of the questions:

Do you support the state law that allows local governments to install red light enforcement cameras?

Spokane bishop: Vote no on Ref. 74

Spokane’s Catholic bishop is urging members of his diocese to vote against the same-sex marriage law that will appear on the Nov. 6 ballot.
In a letter to parishioners available at weekend services, The Rev. Blase Cupich contends that if Referendum 74 passes, it will redefine marriage and create “a major shift in an institution that serves as the foundation stone of society.” He called same-sex marriage a passionate issue, and called for respectful debate that would “generate light rather than heat.”
Zach Silk, campaign manager for the pro-referendum group Washington United for Marriage, said Cupich’s letter comes as no surprise, because the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops has a long-standing opposition to same-sex marriage. Seattle Archbishop J. Peter Sartrain urged Catholics in that archdiocese to sign the petitions to put Ref. 74 on the ballot, Silk noted.
But lay Catholics don’t necessarily agree with their clergy on the issue, he said. . .

To read the rest of this item, go inside the blog.