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CTS: Caddy alive!

Now that it has picked a fight with BMW, Cadillac has to put up or shut up.

As a taxpaying GM shareholder, I’m pleased to report it’s putting up.

Cadillac recently debuted the third-generation of its CTS midsize luxury sport sedan. It debuted in 2002 as a BMW fighter and has been in a state of evolution ever since.

The 2014 CTS ($46,025, including destination) is new from the ground up and presents the most convincing evidence yet that Cadillac is prepared to back up its bluster. The CTS is larger than its predecessor, or about the same size as BMW’s 5 Series. Its cabin grows in refinement and its infotainment and safety systems are more capable. A new platform and longer wheelbase boost ride and handling.   

Two new engine choices — one thrifty, the other sporty — expand the CTS’s mission.

On the outside, Cadillac’s edgy Art & Science design language softens into a more organic — though no less bold — state. The CTS is longer by four inches and slightly shorter and wider. The grille, with the familiar Caddy crest front and center, is flanked by projection headlights, LED running lights and a pair of massive lower-grille intakes.

Counterintuitively, the new midsize rides on a platform developed for the compact ATS. It’s stiff and strong and is 200 pounds lighter than the one it replaces. 

I haven’t tested the CTS’s base suspension, but by all accounts it’s a good one. The CTS is balanced, with 50 percent of its weight up front and 50 percent in back. Its steering is quick, accurate and communicative. Unwanted body motions are well modulated.

My test car added the available Magnetic Ride Control (MRC) system. MRC is a remarkable suspension damping system that produces an ideal — almost unreal — blend of ride comfort and tire grip.
 
The new base engine is a 220-hp turbocharged four (20 city/30 highway) that’s mated to a six-speed automatic transmission. Also new is a twin-turbocharged six that makes 420 hp and powers a new Vsport trim (17/25), which will compete with BMW’s 550i.  

They flank the 321-hp 3.6-liter V-6 (18/29) that carries over from last year.

A new eight-speed automatic transmission is tuned to make aggressive shifts under acceleration but in normal conditions seeks the most efficient — i.e., fuel-sipping — gear.    
All trims but the rear-drive Vsport are available in FWD and AWD configurations. 
 
Inside, all but the base trim are finished in leather. Other materials — the wood, carbon fiber and aluminum — are the genuine item. Premium, hand-sewn, semi-aniline leather seating is available.

Despite its outward growth, the CTS’s interior dimensions remain largely unchanged. Tall passengers may run short on rear-seat legroom; otherwise the cabin is comfy for four.  

Cadillac’s CUE (Cadillac User Experience) solidifies my distaste for touchscreen-based navigation and infotainment systems. CUE’s capabilities are vast but in operation it’s clumsy and distracting. 

For Cadillac, success doesn’t hinge on outselling BMW. It’s almost enough to be considered worthy competition, and you’ll get no argument from here on that score.

Don Adair is a Spokane-based freelance writer. Contact him at don@dadair.com.

2014 Cadillac CTS Premium Collection
Vehicle base price: $45,100
Trim level base price: $64,500
As tested: $67,170
Optional equipment on our up-level Premium Collection tester included Black Diamond tricoat paint and 18-inch polished aluminum wheels.
EPA ratings: 18 city/29 highway
Regular unleaded fuel specified