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Full agenda for tonight’s council meeting

The Sullivan bridge was dedicated in a ceremony on Nov. 9, 1951. The above picture looks northwewstward toward Trentwood. Many valley, county and state officials attended the ceremony opening the $200,000 bridge to traffic. This is the section that carries southbound traffic today and is in need of replacement. Photo Archive/The Spokesman-Review.
  

I'm guessing tonight's Spokane Valley City Council meeting will run long since the agenda is packed. The council is scheduled to vote on whether or not to purchase land on the southern edge of the Spokane Valley Industrial Park for a street maintenance facility. Tonight is also the first reading of two ordinances, one of which would loosen restrictions on chickens in back yards and the other would toughen city code language that applies to adult retail businesses. So far the public comment on the new chicken rules has been overwhelmingly in favor, but the Mayor says the city is beginning to get emails against allowing more chickens.

The council will also hear reports on allowing livestock in mixed use areas, the planned extension of Indiana Avenue east of Sullivan and the Sullivan Road bridge replacement project.

Packed planning commission meeting tomorrow

I'm back at the keyboard after a long day spent with the Spokane Valley City Council in various meetings yesterday. You'll see my story on the regular city council meeting in Thursday's Valley Voice and the story on the council retreat will be in on Saturday.

For those of you that haven't checked the paper yet, some people in Central Valley are unhappy today after yesterday's bond election failed. Several reporters, including the Valley's own Lisa Leinberger, collaborated on a story in today's paper on the various bond and levy elections.

Now then, on to business. The Spokane Valley Planning Comission is meeting tomorrow night at 6 p.m. in City Hall (11707 E. Sprague) and the agenda is packed with items that may draw some interest. There will be more discussion on adult retail entertainment plus a public hearing on possible changes to the city code regarding the keeping of chickens. There will also be a study session on the annual Comprehensive Plan amendments. The comp plan can only be amended once a year and this year the entire Sprague/Appleway Revitalization Plan is up for elimination.

Planning Commission meeting tonight

The Spokane Valley Planning Commission will host its first meeting with two new comissioners at 6 p.m. tonight at City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague. Only one item is on the agenda: a public hearing on a proposed code text amendment to tweak the definition of adult entertainment retail businesses. You can find the current meeting agenda and attached documents on the city's web site here.

More on the porn tax…

From an interview last night with Rep. Mark Miloscia, who’s proposed tacking on an extra 18.5 percent sales tax onto adult videos, cable shows, etc.

“Somebody brought this to me and I said `Wow. Well, why not?’” said Miloscia, D-Federal Way.

His bill is actually a nearly-verbatim copy of a 2004 proposal from Sen. Val Stevens: SB 6741. That bill never even got a hearing.

Unlike a lot of business taxes, Miloscia said he’s not worried about hurting the business climate for porn.

“My constituent, while they care about Microsoft or Boeing, I don’t think the adult entertainment industry is an industry that my constituents would worry about going out of state,” he said. He also said that in a decade in the statehouse, this is the first tax bill he’s ever prime-sponsored.

He gives his own bill “low odds” of passing.

“Tax increases tend to be the issue that people do not support,” he said. To improve its odds, he’s willing to have a statewide vote on the proposal. He said he’s confident that voters would approve.

But even if it passed, one big loophole would remain: Internet pornography.

“The Internet is really tough to tax,” said Miloscia. “The Internet is wild west.”

He spent much of Tuesday fielding calls from reporters about the proposal.

“I didn’t think it was going to get as much attention as it has,” he said.