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Perils of going to heaviest coat too soon

Well, I suppose they are obvious.

Assuming one has multiple winter coats from which to choose, breaking out the warmest one too early deprives the wearer of the comforting knowledge that when it gets really cold, reinforcements will be ready.

Going full-parka before Thanksgiving is like Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Saturday’s highlights

Jayne Singleton, director of the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum, reads a list of Civil War veterans from a 1913 Spokesman-Review Tuesday at the museum. Sources like the old newspaper helped provide links from area pioneers to the Civil War. SR photo/Jesse Tinsley

Here we are at Monday again. It's the start of another work week in addition to being the day for a look at some highlights from Saturday's Valley Voice. Reporter Lisa Leinberger stopped in at the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum to check out a new exhibit on the Civl War. Some of the items on display include bone saws and a 1913 edition of The Spokesman-Review that commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address.

The city of Spokane Valley is taking a look at what could be the final design of the expansion of Balfour Park. Another public meeting is planned for September to get input on what people think of the plan. The expansion would include a reading garden, veterans memorial, picnic shelter, a splash pad and more.

Lisa also has a story on University High School graduate Stevie Gildehaus, who will travel to Brazil next year as a Fulbright scholar. She will help teach English classes as well as take classes at a local university.

What’s it like to grow up back East?

Well, I'll tell you.

One of the first places I ever bought beer was a small store called Stannard's, named after a Vermont general who played a not insignificant role in the final day of the Battle of Gettysburg.

www.vermontcivilwar.org

Your link to Battle of Gettysburg

Did anyone in your family tree take part in that pivotal clash?

If you are going to claim to be related to Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, please present some evidence.

Civil War Event Set At Boise State

Leading Civil War scholars from around the nation will gather at Boise State University on Oct. 25 for a day-long conference entitled, “Why The Civil War Still Matters.” The conference is sponsored y the Andrus Center for Public Policy, the Idaho Humanities Council and the Idaho Council for History Education. Advance registration is required; the $25 registration fee, which includes lunch, will be waived for any current high school or college student. Marc Johnson, president of the Andrus Center, said the conference marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War/Betsy Russell, Eye On Boise. More here.

Question: Are you interested in the Civil War?

Leading Civil War scholars to converge on BSU for Oct. 25 Andrus Center conference

Leading Civil War scholars from around the nation will gather at Boise State University on Oct. 25 for a day-long conference entitled, “Why The Civil War Still Matters.” The conference is sponsored y the Andrus Center for Public Policy, the Idaho Humanities Council and the Idaho Council for History Education. Advance registration is required; the $25 registration fee, which includes lunch, will be waived for any current high school or college student.

Marc Johnson, president of the Andrus Center, said the conference marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. “If you are a Civil War buff, a student of history, or just want a better understanding of how a conflict 150 years ago shaped, and continues to shape, our history, this event should be on your calendar,” Johnson said; there's more info here.

Civil War Sites More Than Battlefields

It was 148 years ago, on three hot days in July, when the turning point in the Civil War came during the Battle of Gettysburg. That epic contest would surely be remembered regardless, but President Lincoln helped cement it in the national consciousness with his famous Gettysburg Address - delivered seven score and eight years ago this Saturday. I had my first encounter with that small Pennsylvania town two score years ago, when my parents dragged their unenthusiastic children through every Civil War battlefield in a six-state region. Later in life I lived about 20 miles west of Gettysburg, along the route Confederate forces followed on their march toward destiny. But it wasn't until I became interested in geology that I discovered the battle that preserved the Union was fought on rocks that tore a supercontinent apart/William L. Spence. More here.

Question: Have you visited a Civil War battlefield? Impression?

APhoto Of The Day — 5.31.11

Sue Boardman, left, a tour guide at the Gettysburg National Military Park, points out an interesting design feature in a monument to former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, center, and others Tuesday during a tour of the Civil War battlefield cemetery in Gettysburg, Pa. Palin did not take questions from the media or make any statements during the brief tour. You write the cutline. (AP Photo/Timothy Jacobsen)

Top Cutlines:

  • 1. Sarah Palin sports a Cheshire cat grin as she watches the spectacular implosion of Newt Gingrich over the skies of D.C. “The idiot should have known buying all that fancy jewelry would come back to bite him in the a**. Now clothes are another story…” — Hereford.
  • 2. Ms. Palin to the tour guide: “Ah, Miss, about four scores and seven years ago…(laughing) you know, whenever that was, that other great Republican President had an ‘address’ here, how I can get one, too?” — JohnA.
  • 3. “There,” cries Sarah Palin, “I can see Mars from here. That’s where man came from” — JeanieS.
  • HM: Dan Gookin

WA Lege Day 93: Senate looks back 150 years

OLYMPIA — The State Senate marked the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War with a resolution today that honors President Lincoln, notes that many veterans headed west and wound up in Washington after the war and recalls that a few former generals served inside the territory.

Lincoln “reasserted our American creed with eloquence and persistence, reminded us of the values upon which this country was founded, and led us through that time of great crisis.” U.S. Grant and George McLellan both served in the state and Isaac Ingalls Stevens, the territory's first governor, was also a general for the Union. (Of note to Spokane, although not mentioned in the resolution, was another Union general, George Wright.)

The Secretary of State's office has a special exhibit on Stevens, who was killed at the Battle of Chantilly in Virginia in 1862, to mark the sesquicentennial.

Of note in the resolution: No mention of the right of states to nullify federal laws. No quibble over the name of the conflict. It sticks with Civil War throughout, none of this War Between the States, Second American Revolution or War of Northern Agression stuff.

During discussion (no debate, really, because no one spoke against the resolution) Sen. Jim Honeyford, R-Sunnyside, donned a stove pipe hat and said that along with being the anniversary of the Civil War which freed slaves, today is also Tax Freedom Day, so people are now freed from working for the government. Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam, responded “You're no Abraham Lincoln.”  

Complex case came down to 15 cows

 

For some of the best legal minds in Washington state, a complicated Spokane divorce that spanned two continents and a bloody civil war came down to this: 15 cows.

The missing herd was part of several legal arguments before the Division III Court of Appeals as justices contemplated custody of two children. In the end their mother, who relocated to Spokane from Sudan, retained custody.

“This saga spans southern Sudan to Spokane, and features a civil war, refugees seeking to escape Africa and a failure of consideration because the war prevented payment of the remaining cows owed the bride’s father,” Judge Kevin Korsmo wrote in an opinion released last week. “Against this chaotic backdrop, the facts and law are often unclear and in some dispute.”

Read the rest of Tom Clouse's story here.