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Rick Eichstaedt named the Center For Justice’s Executive Director


He is sometimes referred to as a "pagan demi-god", even by himself, but I know him as Rick, a friend, an inspiration, and somebody to call and complain to because he often has the answer. In fact, he was the first person to take me out on the Spokane River and things haven't been the same since; it only deepened my appreciation for the lifeblood of our region. It was an informative tour as he pointed out the pollution sources and the legal steps to take action, barbed with his irreverent humor and, of course, beer. 

To me, he's a Spokane diety.

So I'm thrilled to see him named the Executive Director for the Center For Justice and Spokane is a far better place thanks to the Center's presence - and Rick's, so the move is a perfect fit. From Tim Connor and Anne Vodicka's excellent story on the announcement, titled "It's Rick":


“I’m very passionate about the Center’s work,” Eichstaedt says, “because we touch the lives of many people in a meaningful and positive way. When I meet people in the community and tell them where I work, they share stories with me about how the Center has affected or even transformed their lives. The Center makes a difference on a large scale with the Spokane River and police accountability, but the Center’s not just everything you read about in the paper. We help people get their driver’s licenses back, we help them to stay in their homes, and we help their families stay intact. We really are the community’s law firm.”

After receiving his J.D. and a certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources law from the Northwestern School of Law of Lewis and Clark College in 1997, Eichstaedt spent seven years working on a variety of legal issues on behalf of the Nez Perce Tribe in Idaho. He serves as a board member of Idaho River United, which works to protect rivers across Idaho, Rick also leads Gonzaga’s Environmental Law clinic.  

South Hill connections on Facebook

If you are on Facebook and curious about what's going on not just in the South Perry District but in nearby neighborhoods, here are a few Facebook sites for you to follow:

The Manito Neighborhood Site can be found here.

Spokane Southie, a blog written by a South Hill Woman, can be found here.

The Manito/Cannon Hill Neighborhood Council can be found here.

The South Perry Fair and Parade Facebook site can be found here. It's often used to announce neighborhood news during the off season.

And here is the link to the East Central Community Center's Facebook page.

I'm sure I missed some community organizations - let me know.

October: The Power of Pink, The Power of Community

Each October I honor my grandmother, a breast cancer survivor, by re-posting this 2006 column.  She was, and will always be, an inspiration and a guiding force in my life. CAM

 

 

The Home Planet: Community potent weapon against breast cancer

Cheryl-Anne Millsap
Staff writer
Oct 30., 2006

 

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month. I’m sure you’ve noticed – next to the orange and black Halloween and harvest decorations – the pink ribbons, pink tools, pink kitchen gadgets, all being sold guaranteeing part of the profit will go to work for a cure for breast cancer.

Thanks to the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, pink is the other color of October.

Now pink is the signature color of breast cancer awareness, the color of breast cancer research and, for some, the color of hope and success.

Pink is also the color of community. And that might just be one of the most powerful weapon in the arsenal against breast cancer

When I was a small child I went with my younger sister and infant brother to live with my grandparents. Our young mother was simply unable to care for us.

Two years later, in 1963, my grandmother – a woman who had just turned 50 – found a lump in her breast. After her surgery, the surgeon walked into the waiting room, put his hand on my grandfather’s shoulder and gave him the bad news. It was cancer. And it was very serious. She might not make it.

Both of my grandmother’s breasts were removed and she started her treatment. I don’t really know what was done to fight her cancer, beyond the surgery and radiation treatments, but I know she lost her hair.

During this time my brother, sister and I were aware that our grandmother was ill; I have a vague memory of her being in the hospital, of my grandfather brushing my hair, something my grandmother usually did. I remember the strangeness of finding him in the kitchen cooking hot cereal. I remember her wearing a wig.

We knew she was sick but the seriousness of her illness was never mentioned. You just didn’t talk about that kind of thing. Especially with children.

As soon as she was well enough, my grandfather went back to work and so did she. She went back to keeping house, to cooking all of our meals and caring for three young children. Back to raising a second family.

Although, when we got older, we were told that my grandmother had had breast cancer, the full impact of what she had been through didn’t hit me until much later. Until the pink campaign.

In 1990, at the first Komen National Race for the Cure in Washington, D.C., pink ribbons were worn to signify status as a breast cancer survivor. The little badge took off and became a universal symbol. The simple pink ribbons worn that day have evolved into a potent marketing tool.

Now October has gone pink. I’ll admit that when I see pink kitchen mixers, pink umbrellas and pink vacuum cleaners, each promising to donate a portion of the profits from each sale to breast cancer research, I am vaguely irritated by all the hype. Enough already, I think. I get it.

But then I think about the monumental effort behind the campaign, and the work that has been done because of it, and I think about the world my grandmother lived in and changes that have come about. There’s a lot of power in that pink.

Just 40 years ago, we didn’t talk about cancer. You especially didn’t talk about breast cancer. Women like my grandmother had no choice but to soldier on taking care of homes and families, keeping what they endured to themselves, without the benefit of therapy or counseling. There were no support groups.

My grandmother was a relatively young woman to be raising grandchildren. She didn’t have a large circle of friends. She didn’t go to clubs or meetings. She didn’t meet other mothers for lunch downtown. She didn’t even drive. She was a true stay-at-home caregiver.

She battled cancer and the permanent effects of that battle, with only my grandfather to hold her hand. And she beat the odds. Despite a poor prognosis, she lived 20 years after her surgery before the disease reappeared. But what she didn’t have access to when she was so sick, and what I have to think would have been good medicine, was the support that only other fighters and survivors can offer.

She had sympathy but no empathy. She had no one to go to and complain, or cry, or shake her fist and scream about the pain and unfairness of what had happened to her.

That is a tool that, if today I was to find myself in her place, I would reach for immediately.

The scars after my grandmother’s surgery were disfiguring. But as I get older I wonder about the scars that were hidden. The scars no one ever saw.

There were no stitches or soothing salves for those wounds. She was left to care for them on her own.

The advances in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer; the advances in the search for a cause and a cure since my grandmother’s illness in 1963, have been huge.

Now, there are television commercials and magazine ads urging women to get mammograms and to make a pledge to remind one another to do regular breast self-exams.

Now, if a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer there is a community for her.

The disease is no longer shuttered and closeted. When a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer she doesn’t just have the benefit of science and medicine behind her. She has the benefit of a corporate identity; a network of support groups, literature, advocacy and caring. That community is a big advance.

October only lasts 31 days, but the power of pink can last a lifetime.

 

Cheryl-Anne Millsap writes for The Spokesman-Review and is a contributing editor at Spokane Metro Magazine. Her essays can be heard on Spokane Public Radio and on public radio stations across the country. She is the author of “Home Planet: A Life in Four Seasons” and can be reached at catmillsap@gmail.com

Sumptuous fare…

Good morning, Netizens…

 

Imagine, if you will, a street scene in Spokane, where the warm August afternoon lays across the city like a lazy courtesan, granting her favors to some but not all our residents.

 

A gang unit police car, always eagerly sniffing the air for errant activity in our neighborhood, smoothly idles down the summer street, and spying a young woman dressed in a gang hoody, he pauses beside her on the street and rolling down his passenger window, politely asks her name, where she lives and where she is going. From my vantage point, I can see him typing on the terminal inside the car, perhaps verifying who she might be.

 

Another day, perhaps, he might have put her inside the sterile cocoon of the squad car, but today he simply concluded his conversation, watching her closely as she continued up the street, ostensibly toward her destination. Or perhaps she was who she stated, albeit dressed in gang attire, walking down the sidewalk in a benign neighborhood, minding her own business and trying to avoid trouble. With a clash of technology, he suddenly accelerates, and within a few minutes I see him dashing up the next street down, once more in the hunt for someone who perhaps fits a profile that he recognizes as someone who is up to no good.

 

As the afternoon continues waning, the birds in the trees begin quieting down for the evening, the kids on their bicycles that have been eagerly moving up and down the avenue in a madcap manner for most of the day, have nearly all headed for home and the genteel tranquility of the neighborhood slowly begins delicately slowing down to its evening serenity.

 

It was nearly dusk when I heard an approaching young woman's voice from up the street singing, and so I remained in my chair on the front lawn the better to see what this might be about. As she passed by I could discern she was perhaps 14 or 15 years of age, with long red pigtails, riding her bicycle, and singing the National Anthem in her delicate voice, as she hustled down the street on her way to somewhere in the evening dusk. Perhaps sensing me sitting in the shadow of the bushes, she stands upright on her bike's pedals and increases her speed as she moves across the intersection and on down the avenue. She could have sung anything and I probably would not have recalled it later, but even as she crossed a block down from where I sat, I could still hear her singing as she passed through the evening ether.

 

When it transparently fell from dusk to nearly darkness, and still contemplating the young woman riding her bike and singing our National Anthem, I finally withdrew for the night, and rejoined my family gathered around the kitchen table. When I related the sight of the young girl singing as she rode through the dusk, and the song she chose to sing as she traveled down the street, my family understood how it had touched me, and left me satisfied, like I had just had a good meal.

 

Life doesn't get much better than this, I guess.

 

Dave

Friday Night Around the World

(Photo by Cheryl-Anne Millsap)   

 

 

   On my last day in Switzerland, I walked around Zurich, visiting museums, wandering up and down cobblestoned streets window-shopping and trying to lock it all in my memory.  I strolled along the river and over bridges, people-watching, stopping to look at the sailboats on the lake. I was leaving in the morning, catching a Saturday flight and I was tired, ready to get back home and to see my family. But I didn’t want to miss a moment while I was in such a beautiful place, because Zurich is very beautiful.

    Finally, after an early dinner, I made my way back to the hotel. Back to one of those spaces Americans just don’t appreciate. We’re too used to modern boxes with uniform spaces. My room was the last room on the hallway on the seventh floor, the top floor of the building. The elevator stopped at the sixth floor and I had to carry my suitcase up one more flight. I thought how my friends would fuss and grumble about that little inconvenience, but, perversely, I liked the idea of being tucked away.


    Inside the room a double bed was tucked against the wall under a sloping ceiling and a single, tall, narrow, arched window opened up to a splendid view of the city.  It was a storybook place, like something from a movie or one of the romantic novels I’d read as a girl. I propped my suitcase in the corner and crossed over to open the window, grateful for the cool breeze that filled the room, making the curtains dance.


    I could see the tower on the Uetilberg - I’d been there the day before - and all the buildings of the city spread out below me. The train station and landmark hotels were easy to identify. The lake was just out of sight. On one side was the tall spire of the cathedral. On the other a row of old attached houses curved along the street in the University district. As they do in so many European cities, many of the houses had small patios or terraces built on the narrow, flat rooftops and the owners had decorated these private spaces with potted trees and hanging plants. Where there was room, some owners had added a small table and chairs. 


    The view was so different from what I see when I am at home, I stood there a long time, soaking it all in before turning back into my room to pack.


    Just a few minutes later laughter drew me back to the window, and the sound of knives and forks on crockery and corks being pulled from wine bottles.


    When I looked this time, I noticed that all around me the skyline had come alive with movement. Men and women, college students and young couples had moved up to the roof and were silhouetted against the sunset. The day was dying but the air was  suddenly filled with the musical sound of people at ease and happy; celebrating the end of the week; just as they do in my neighborhood when people sit on the patio and fire up the grill, laughing, calling out to one another or children as they play in the back yard.


    As I watched, one by one, lights came on in the houses around me and windows glowed like golden gems in the deepening twilight. It was nothing special but it was, at that moment, extraordinarily beautiful.


    That’s the thing about travel. You can cross oceans and continents, time zones and cultural divides, but ultimately, in the most ordinary, unexpected ways, like the universal sounds of people relaxing on a Friday night, you discover not just the ways we are different, but the simple and striking ways we are all alike.

    
Cheryl-Anne Millsap writes for The Spokesman-Review. Her essays can be heard on Spokane Public Radio and on public radio stations across the country. She is the author of “Home Planet: A Life in Four Seasons” and can be reached at catmillsap@gmail.com
  

Over 175 South Hill residents have signed up to make their homes more energy efficient with SustainableWorks

Great update from Sustainable Works: This Earth Day South Hill residents have the opportunity to drastically lower their carbon footprint by participating in SustainableWorks, a Spokane based non-profit that is offering reduced cost energy audits and home retrofits. SustainableWorks is partnering with Washington State University Extension, Avista Utilities, the City of Spokane Office of Sustainability, the Spokane Alliance and others to bring this energy saving opportunity to the South Hill. The purpose of this stimulus-funded program is to help homeowners and renters (with landlord approval) make home improvements that reduce their energy use and energy bills. Participants can save on items like furnaces, water heaters, insulation and air sealing. SustainableWorks has already completed 200 audits and 100 retrofits in other neighborhoods in Spokane. Spokane residents that have already participated are saving up to 40% on their energy bills, and are benefitting from increased comfort in their homes this winter.

  

SustainableWorks launches South Hill campaign

SustainableWorks is gearing up for an exciting year. The local non-profit that works with residents to do energy audits and weatherization retrofits on their homes will move to the South Hill, after finishing audits in Shadle and Audubon. According to Spokane organizer Luke Tolley,  so far, they've completed more than 180 energy audits and 80 weatherization retrofits which equates to 175,000lbs of carbon that is not put into the environment annually and created 10 full time employee positions - all the while saving residents an average of 20% to 40% on their energy bills.



Check the below announcement about the February 23rd kickoff to learn more about their ambitious, new campaign:

South Hill residents can access stimulus funds to save energy, save money, and create quality jobs

On February 23rd, South Hill Spokane residents will get the opportunity to attend an event to learn about SustainableWorks, a Spokane based non-profit that is offering reduced cost energy audits and home retrofits. SustainableWorks’ South Hill Energy Efficiency Kick-off event is taking place at the Sacajawea Middle School cafeteria on Wednesday, February 23rd from 6:30-8:30pm. SustainableWorks is partnering with Washington State University Energy Extension, Avista Utilities, the City of Spokane Office of Sustainability, the Spokane Alliance and others to bring this energy saving opportunity to the South Hill. The purpose of this stimulus-funded program is to help homeowners, small business owners and renters (with landlord approval) make home improvements that reduce their energy use and energy bills. Participants can save on items like furnaces, water heaters, insulation and air sealing. SustainableWorks has already completed 200 audits and 100 retrofits in other neighborhoods in Spokane. Spokane residents that have already participated are saving up to 40% on their energy bills, and are benefitting from increased comfort in their homes this winter.

A circle of friends and writers

(photo by Cheryl-Anne Millsap)

 

    Most Monday nights we gather together
    We open the door of the small building that houses the studio of an artist friend and walk into the warmth of a room filled with the all the tools and spirit of creativity.
    There is a kind of homecoming each time we meet. Someone might bring a loaf of fresh bread. Someone else puts cheese and crackers on a plate. On a good night a bottle of wine is opened and shared.
    For the first half-hour we talk. We talk about what has happened since we last met. Catching up with marriages, work and all the other portions of our lives, we strengthen the ties that bind us together. And then, when it’s time, we get to work.
    One by one, safe in the company of kindred spirits, we read the words put down on paper since we last met.
    We are a circle of writers.  Some of us do it professionally, others are more casual. But the one thing in common is that each one of us writes because something inside us won’t rest until we do. Each of us has a story to tell and we want tell it in our own way.
    There is, deep in the center of most people, a strong desire to leave something behind. We want to leave our story. A map to who we were. A chronicle of the things we dreamed and worked for; of the loves we shared and the heartaches we survived.
    In the Monday writing studio we are in turn, survivors, lovers, mothers, wives and sisters. And what we share - besides the bread and wine - is the determination to overcome the barriers of shyness, insecurity, fractured schedules and even, occasionally, the interference of others. We want to write and we’re willing to go to great lengths to find a way to do it.
    Most Monday nights there is a reason not to go to the studio. There is  work to finish before deadline. There is housework. There are family responsibilities that pull at us. But usually, unless we’re out of town, we make it. We open the door to the writer within us. One word, one Monday, at a time.

Cheryl-Anne Millsap writes for The Spokesman-Review. Her essays can be heard on Spokane Public Radio and on public radio stations across the country. She is the author of “Home Planet: A Life in Four Seasons” and can be reached at catmillsap@gmail.com

Sustainable Works celebrates one year of awesome

Good news today for sustainable communities.

After learning about the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s regional planning grants announcement this morning, our own local non-profit, Sustainable Works, that does energy audits and retrofits, sent a notice about their first birthday celebration. Awww. They deserve props: In the last year, Sustainable Works audited over 160 Spokane homes and performed 70- full-energy retrofits and the program continues having moved from the South Perry neighborhood to Audubon and Shadle.

The party starts Wednesday, October 20th, 7pm at Browne Elementary, 5102 N. Driscoll Avenue.
 
From Kellie Stickney:

On October 20th,  SustainableWorks, a Spokane-based non-profit will be celebrating one-year of stimulus funded energy efficiency audits and retrofits by expanding its program to include the entire 99205 zip code. The celebration and neighborhood launch will be held at Browne Elementary on Wednesday, October 20th from 7-8pm. In the last year, SustainableWorks has audited over 160 Spokane homes and performed 70- full-energy retrofits. Participants have saved significantly on items like insulation, furnaces and water heaters, and reduced their energy costs by 20-40%. The SustainableWorks project has also been able to put a number of skilled trade people back to work in family-wage jobs.

“The SustainableWorks project offers a great opportunity for residents to take advantage of stimulus funds to lower their energy bills, improve their homes and lower their carbon emissions,” said Justin Bell, volunteer with SustainableWorks and 99205 resident. “It’s great to be part of a project that’s saving people money and putting my neighbors back to work.”

Breast Cancer: The Power of Pink.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month. In 2006 I wrote the following column to honor my grandmother who was born in October and died in the same month 70 years later. This is her story. I’d like to share it again this year:

October 30, 2006

The Home Planet: Community potent weapon against breast cancer

 

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month. I’m sure you’ve noticed – next to the orange and black Halloween and harvest decorations – the pink ribbons, pink tools, pink kitchen gadgets, all being sold guaranteeing part of the profit will go to work for a cure for breast cancer.

Thanks to the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, pink is the other color of October.

Now pink is the signature color of breast cancer awareness, the color of breast cancer research and, for some, the color of hope and success.

Pink is also the color of community. And that might just be one of the most powerful weapon in the arsenal against breast cancer

When I was a small child I went with my younger sister and infant brother to live with my grandparents. Our young mother was simply unable to care for us.

Two years later, in 1963, my grandmother – a woman who had just turned 50 – found a lump in her breast. After her surgery, the surgeon walked into the waiting room, put his hand on my grandfather’s shoulder and gave him the bad news. It was cancer. And it was very serious. She might not make it.

Both of my grandmother’s breasts were removed and she started her treatment. I don’t really know what was done to fight her cancer, beyond the surgery and radiation treatments, but I know she lost her hair.

During this time my brother, sister and I were aware that our grandmother was ill; I have a vague memory of her being in the hospital, of my grandfather brushing my hair, something my grandmother usually did. I remember the strangeness of finding him in the kitchen cooking hot cereal. I remember her wearing a wig.

We knew she was sick but the seriousness of her illness was never mentioned. You just didn’t talk about that kind of thing. Especially with children.

As soon as she was well enough, my grandfather went back to work and so did she. She went back to keeping house, to cooking all of our meals and caring for three young children. Back to raising a second family.

Although, when we got older, we were told that my grandmother had had breast cancer, the full impact of what she had been through didn’t hit me until much later. Until the pink campaign.

In 1990, at the first Komen National Race for the Cure in Washington, D.C., pink ribbons were worn to signify status as a breast cancer survivor. The little badge took off and became a universal symbol. The simple pink ribbons worn that day have evolved into a potent marketing tool.

Now October has gone pink. I’ll admit that when I see pink kitchen mixers, pink umbrellas and pink vacuum cleaners, each promising to donate a portion of the profits from each sale to breast cancer research, I am vaguely irritated by all the hype. Enough already, I think. I get it.

But then I think about the monumental effort behind the campaign, and the work that has been done because of it, and I think about the world my grandmother lived in and changes that have come about. There’s a lot of power in that pink.

Just 40 years ago, we didn’t talk about cancer. You especially didn’t talk about breast cancer. Women like my grandmother had no choice but to soldier on taking care of homes and families, keeping what they endured to themselves, without the benefit of therapy or counseling. There were no support groups.

My grandmother was a relatively young woman to be raising grandchildren. She didn’t have a large circle of friends. She didn’t go to clubs or meetings. She didn’t meet other mothers for lunch downtown. She didn’t even drive. She was a true stay-at-home caregiver.

She battled cancer and the permanent effects of that battle, with only my grandfather to hold her hand. And she beat the odds. Despite a poor prognosis, she lived 20 years after her surgery before the disease reappeared. But what she didn’t have access to when she was so sick, and what I have to think would have been good medicine, was the support that only other fighters and survivors can offer.

She had sympathy but no empathy. She had no one to go to and complain, or cry, or shake her fist and scream about the pain and unfairness of what had happened to her.

That is a tool that, if today I was to find myself in her place, I would reach for immediately.

The scars after my grandmother’s surgery were disfiguring. But as I get older I wonder about the scars that were hidden. The scars no one ever saw.

There were no stitches or soothing salves for those wounds. She was left to care for them on her own.

The advances in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer; the advances in the search for a cause and a cure since my grandmother’s illness in 1963, have been huge.

Now, there are television commercials and magazine ads urging women to get mammograms and to make a pledge to remind one another to do regular breast self-exams.

Now, if a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer there is a community for her.

The disease is no longer shuttered and closeted. When a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer she doesn’t just have the benefit of science and medicine behind her. She has the benefit of a corporate identity; a network of support groups, literature, advocacy and caring. That community is a big advance.

October only lasts 31 days, but the power of pink can last a lifetime.


Cheryl-Anne Millsap is a freelance columnist for The Spokesman-Review. Her essays can be heard on Spokane Public Radio and on public radio stations across the country. She is the author of “Home Planet: A Life in Four Seasons” and can be reached at catmillsap@gmail.com

Register for The Spokane River Clean Up

It’s that time again.


















Please sign up today to help out at one of my favorite events, the Spokane River Clean Up. The Cleanup is on for Saturday, September 25th from 9am to 3pm. Registration is open, so go to friendsofthefalls.org to register as a volunteer today!

We are halfways through summer

I hope you all had a great Fourth of July weekend. It seemed relatively quiet in the little neighborhood – I have a feeling the colder weather put a damper on fireworks and many an outdoor party.

How was your Fourth of July?

And I hate to bring it up but we’re more than half-ways through the very cold and rainy summer we’ve had so far – how are you coping?

The South Perry Blog would like to talk to some gardeners – this was of course the first summer I planted tomato plants in ages, and they still look cold and tired. Same goes for the basil.

This week’s Thursday morning blog session will be postponed to July 15 which is, drum roll please, the Thursday prior to the South Perry Fair and Parade on July 17. Have you filled out your parade form? The blog will be looking for you…

Bike to work and blogging

I’ll be back at The Shop tomorrow morning, Thursday 5/20, at around 7 a.m. so come on in and chat for a bit, if you have time.

I’d really like to talk to a couple of people who are participating in Bike to Work Week - stop by and tell me about your commute.

A couple of readers have suggested I do something about the history of the South Perry District, which seems like an excellent idea. I’ve covered the area since 1998, so I’m pretty familiar with the recent history of the area, but I’d be very interested in talking to some long-term residents - people who’ve lived on and around South Perry for 25 years or more. I’d also like to hear from people who were born and grew up on South Perry 40 or more years ago, even if you moved away. It’s a diverse neighborhood, I’m sure there are some good stories out there just waiting to be told.

 

 

 

Children’s clothing swap this Saturday

The Spokane Buddhist Temple is having a clothing exchange for children ages newborn to 16 on Saturday, from 10 a.m. to noon. The Temple is asking for donations of clothes without tears, rips or stains. If you can’t make it on Saturday, donations may be dropped off downstairs, or after hours at the basement door, just north of the main stairs. On Saturday, participants can bring a bag of clothing, then start sorting from 10-10:30 a.m. When everything is sorted out, you get to pick clothes from 10:40-11:30 a.m. After that, you can pick items for friends who aren’t there. The Temple is asking for a $1 donation to participate. The Temple is located at 927 S. Perry Street. For more information e-mail spokanebuddhisttemple@gmail.com

Electric car much loved by owner

Roger Imes calls it totally guiltless driving and he loves it. About two years ago he set out looking for an electric car – a NEV, neighborhood electric vehicle – and he found one in Ohio.

It cost him a little more than $13,000, including shipping to Spokane, and he has never regretted buying it.

“It is a minimal car. It will get you from A to B with a minimal impact on the environment,” said Imes, one of the owners of Lorien Herbs South Perry. “There is no oil, no water, no gasoline - you can drive it and you wont feel responsible for Middle Eastern wars or anything like that.”

The ZENN (Zero Emission, No Noise) vehicle, is registered like any ordinary car and it looks much like a mix between a covered golf car and a tiny ordinary car. It can’t go on the freeway, but it can be driven anywhere else. Charging the batteries takes a little more than four hours and it will take the car 25 miles.

“The batteries will last four or five years,” said Imes. “We hardly drive our other cars anymore.”
The ZENN has a top speed of 25 mph and it’s a roomy little thing: it has plenty of room for groceries or a nice-sized dog in the back.

Imes said it is crash tested and all that, but he’s not too worried about getting in a wreck.

“Frankly, I think it’s so light it would just bounce off the other vehicle,” Imes said.

And no, his power bill hasn’t gone up since he started charging the car at home.

“It is not the car for everyone, but I love it,” said Imes. “And it’s perfect for just getting around the neighborhood.”

Time for tea and dolls

Liberty Park United Methodist Church, which is located at 1526 E. 11th Avenue, is holding its annual tea on Thursday May 13 from noon to 2 p.m. Church members will display antique, vintage and cultural dolls, and guests are invited to bring their own dolls along for a visit.

On the menu are sandwiches, deviled eggs and veggies, as well as coffee, tea and cookies. And you get all that for just $3 per person. RSVP to the church by calling (509) 535-5905.

South Perry dog park idea

I got an e-mail from one of my South Perry neighbors last week. She had an interesting suggestion: how about turning that grassy area off Southeast Boulevard and 10th Avenue into a dog park?
Stopping by the other day, I noticed that lots of people are already walking their dogs there - so it seems to be a popular spot.
What I didn’t know is that it’s an underground water reservoir. So the property belongs to the City of Spokane’s Water Department, but hey, maybe it could work out?

The city and Spokanimal are already working together on developing a dog park closer to downtown.

Thoughts?

South Perry Blog at The Shop Thursday

The South Perry Blog is coming to a coffee house near you. On May 6, (that’s Thursday morning) from 7-10 a.m. I’ll be at The Shop (924 S. Perry Street) consuming large amounts of coffee and handing out a free South Voice section to the first dozen of my neighbors who drop in for a little chat.

I’m looking forward to meeting you all - bring ideas big and small - I’ll be the woman with the laptop and the camera.

Make your streets safer

Pedestrian safety week is coming up and the City Of Spokane will have a walkability audit workshop this Saturday.

The Office Of Neighborhood Services partnered with the Bicycle Alliance of Washington and the Pedestrian Transportation and Traffic Committee (PeTT) to host a walkability audit workshop on March 20th from 9:00a.m. to approximately 12:00p.m. Training will be held at St Aloysius School (611 E Mission Ave.) in the cafeteria.

From ONS: At this workshop you will learn how to host a walkability audit in your own neighborhood and how to use these audits in federal grant applications for the improvement of your neighborhood’s streets and sidewalks. This section of the training will be followed up by some hands on experience as you will have the opportunity to implement an audit around St. Aloysius School in the Logan Neighborhood.

We hope that you will use your new walkability audit talent to host an audit in your neighborhood during Traffic Awareness and Pedestrian Safety Week (April 9-18).

You can RSVP on Facebook or contact Sandy Scott via email at sscott@spokanecity.org or call at 625-6730. We hope to see you there!

 

And the results are in…

The moment you’ve all been waiting for…drum roll…the Spokane River Clean-up had over 750 people turn out this year, about 175 of those in the U District and the rest at High Bridge Park. 16,447 pounds of trash were collected and sorted; 5,207 pounds were recycled. Not too shabby. Once again, perhaps the most important statistic, no serious injuries. Awesome.

The Spokane River Clean-up: Still time to pre-register, a few team leaders needed

Although last night was the team leader orientation—-which was great, thanks for asking—- we could still use some more assistance. This is a fun, can’t miss event and it gets better and better each year. DTE will be in full force this Saturday morning, so join us, your friends, fellow community members, and everybody who cares deeply about the river for an awesome experience. From Friends Of the Falls:


Last year over 800 people volunteered, collecting over eight tons of debris and recycling over two tons of it. In addition to our longstanding tradition of work in the Spokane River Gorge, this year, we’ve added a second location in the University District. In years past, the River Clean-Up has taken place in October, but this year, we moved it to September to take place on National Public Lands Day, during Sustainable September Spokane.

(Image courtesy of northwestwhitewater.org.)

Boater? We could use your help for in-river clean-up assistance.

Cyclist? You can be on the team that rides to the most distant point on our map (mountain bikes recommended).

How to register Whether you are a team leader or not it, pre-registration is highly recommended. Visit HERE to pre-register now!

KYRS: The Karen Dorn Steele interview

Today at 1pm, tune into KYRS Thin Air Community Radio (FM 92.3 & 89.9) to hear Tim Connor’s interview with award-winning investigative reporter Karen Dorn Steele. Both are brilliant journalists, and Steele will discuss the challenges of covering Hanford and, inexorably, sensitive topics like her departure from the Spokesman-Review.


(Steele at the S-R in a 1989 photo. Image courtesy of Center For Justice.)

 

 

It’s not actually a live broadcast. The broadcast will come from the digital recording Connor, CFJ’s Communications Director, made of his June 17th interview for a popular feature that appeared online July 4th, titled “Outside Looking Back.”  (DTE note: Required reading.)

“It was great to see how much feedback we got from all over the country on the published interview with Karen that we ran last month,” Connor said in an email to CFJ subscribers.  ”KYRS was immediately interested in the remarkable content of the interview and, as it turned out, the audio from the stereo digital recorder I used for my notes is broadcast caliber. So, we lucked out and it’s terrific to be able to share this with Spokane radio listeners. Karen Dorn Steele is one of my heroes and, to her credit, she answered all my questions—-even the hard ones—-without flinching a bit.”

Friday Quote


“Speculation about Sarah Palin’s tanking as Alaska’s governor can’t be overshadowed by her retrograde thinking on climate change ­— she doesn’t think humans are responsible for global warming. Moreover, she doesn’t believe in protecting and preserving the natural world because she sees the end of days will soon be upon us. Palin loves this wacko place.”

And…

“…sustainability is not just a matter of resource management and smart grids and retrofitting to so-called greener technology and products. It’s more than cradle-to-cradle action. More than biomimicry. It’s more than Transition Cities popping up here and there. And more than media and psychological spin. Corporations, institutions, and governments need to take that Natural Step into eco-community thinking. We need leaders to enlist cultural experts, artists, writers, planners, strategic thinkers, rabble rousers, performance artists, educators, and myriad of other social science and soft science experts, as well as the cadre of software wonks and technologists and design engineers.”

Both above quotes are excerpts from Paul K. Haeder’s first post HERE on the PacificCAD’s Sustainability Blog. Titled “Spin, Flat-Earth Thinking, Marketing - How Do We Frame Climate Change So Everyone Gets It,” it’s more unfiltered (yes, as a blog should be) than his insightful commentary over at The Inlander. That’s a very good thing. It’s a brilliantly bizarre introduction, filled with Haeder’s usual intensity and razor-sharp perspective. Your head might hurt from absorbing multiple points but you’ll come away with a better grasp of the societal understanding of climate change.

Small business shout-out: One World Spokane

Kicking off a new series, it seems fitting to begin with one of our city’s treasures: One World Spokane. You might already be familiar with the nonprofit community kitchen at 1804 E. Sprague. Their unconventional approach—-no menu and no prices—-has garnered attention from The Spokesman to The Spovangelist. That said, the food itself is delicious with a wide variety from spinach pizza, quiche, curried vegetables, and trout barley soup. Local organic food is prepared in small batches to reduce waste, and you’ll be asked to request the portion you can eat while paying a fair amount. They also donate to community food banks, and provide a complimentary meal for those who can’t afford to pay.

A Day Down The Boulevard

We love Spokane’s funky little neighborhoods, especially The Audubon District. One of Spokane’s best kept secrets, on June 20th head down to Northwest Boulevard for “A Day Down The Boulevard” highlighting local food and wine.

Check the press release below for more details and visit the event at Facebook and grab coupons at The Purple Turtle’s blog HERE.


From The Purple Turtle: On June 20 from 9a.m.-5p.m. six businesses on Northwest Boulevard will be hosting “A Day Down the Boulevard.” It will be a day of promotions, classes, live music, free gifts, a cooking demo and more. The participating businesses, Downriver Grill, Little Garden Café, Polka Dot Pottery, Judy’s Enchanted Garden, Hartwell’s and Uniquely Chic, are inviting the community to come out and enjoy the festivities on the boulevard. The event will take place at each of the six businesses on Northwest Boulevard or in the newly coined, “Audubon District”, across from Audubon Park. Guests can make their way from Uniquely Chic to Downriver Grill with the help of the event map found at any of the participating businesses. The reverse side of the map is a punch card with which guests can be entered to win a $500 grand prize basket on display at Hartwell’s.

The day will be filled with numerous promotions and activities. Paint your own garden stake for free Saturday only at Polka Dot Pottery. Go to Little Garden Café at 9a.m. or 1p.m. for Coffee 101 classes. Visit Downriver Grill at 10a.m. for a cooking demo with Sonnenberg’s sausage Puttanesca, paired with the restaurant’s “Relentless Red” blend.

“A Day Down The Boulevard” will be a great opportunity for the six businesses to introduce themselves to the community as “The Audubon District” while at the same time offering perks to benefit all guests.

For more information please call Pam Stewart at 509.216.0457 or go HERE.

Street trees

Spokane is a treehugger’s dream with an urban canopy that highlights a historical beauty in neighborhoods from the South Hill to Browne’s Addition, north to Corbin Park and east to Millwood. The Spokane Preservation Advocates are working hard to help the City of Spokane achieve street tree preservation initiatives. Take it from this blogger’s frontyard near 2nd and Cannon, our trees are absolutely essential to the city.

Also, head to Interplayers Thursday, June 18th, 7pm, as Spokane Preservation Advocates (SPA) will present a free lecture given by Dr. Mike Kuhns, Extension Forester from Utah State University titled “How to Fit Large Trees Into Landscapes.”

For some background info on our street trees, check the following links from SPA after the jump:

IMPORTANT DTE ANNOUNCEMENT!

It has been almost two years since we began the Down To Earth blog, and the next two Sundays we’re hosting events that fully realize what we talked about in the initial planning stages: A community dialogue on sustainability and environmental issues.

First, let’s focus on this upcoming Saturday, April 18th at 3pm in the South Hill Huckleberry’s bistro area. We’re moderating—-what we hope will be the first of many discussions—-a group of passionate panelists, asking them about what they do and why, how each panelist is connected to the Earth Day and what they hope to accomplish.

Our panelists:

Jim Schrock - Owner of Earthworks Recycling in Spokane. Jim is heavily involved in this year’s Spokane Earth Day celebration planning, as well as being an extremely active member in the environmental community. For over 28 years, Earthworks Recycling has operated in Spokane

Green Drinks

Not literally. That would be weird.

Green Drinks in the sense of the informal monthly networking event to start an environmentally focused dialogue over libations. Held in more than 300 cities around the globe, this will be the one-year anniversary of Green Drinks in Spokane. We received an email from Crystal Gartner at the wonderful Conservation Northwest, who will actually sponsor the next event, asking us to “raise your glass to a sustainable Spokane.” The next Green Drinks will take place at Zola (upstairs in the “Tilt-a-Whirl” room), 22 W. Main, from 5:30 to 9:00pm.

(P.S. Stay tuned for DTE’s next round of “Greener Drinks.” Good times.)

Building something out of nothing

New construction leaves a big carbon footprint, and after reading “Unsustainable Seattle,” we think it makes perfect sense for environmentalists and historic preservationists to form an alliance in creating a sustainable urban landscape for Spokane. And if there’s a good thing about a bad economy, preservation often becomes easier as buy new growth models are disrupted.

In that essay, Donovan D. Rypkema, an economic development consultant from Washington, D.C., made the case for surpisingly reticent parties to integrate their efforts:

When you rehabilitate a historic building, you are reducing waste generation. When you reuse a historic building, you are increasing recycling. In fact, historic preservation is the ultimate in recycling.

At most perhaps 10% of what the environmental movement does advances the cause of historic preservation. But 100% of what the preservation movement does advances the cause of the environment.

Friday Quote

“More and more of us in the industrialized world are feeling a spiritual void, and coming to believe that moving away from consumerism and towards community may be an important step in recovering that nameless thing we’ve lost.” —- Pulitzer Prize winning poet Gary Snyder.

As a bonus, check out The Story Of Stuff.