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Earth Day Spokane

All of this Earth Day news has got me excited so it's time to show several video highlights from past events. Enjoy:

Earth Day, from 2 perspectives

At Spin Control, we get a wide range of suggestions from e-mail, Twitter and Facebook on a wide variety of topics most days. But seldom do we get something with such a sharp dichotomy on the topic of the day, which is Earth Day.

We got word of a contest from Press the President, a group which describes itself as "a worldwide forum for unfiltered debate about U.S. issues that affect the globe." It's sponsoring a photo contest this month for people to show how they are helping the environment this spring, and even has some helpful tips, such as eat vegetarian one day a week, bring your own cup to the coffee stand rather than using one of their paper ones, or give somebody that Christmas present you don't like rather than throwing it out, or planting a garden. (Obviously their worldwide forum includes some real intellectual heavyweights and novel thinkers.)

Press the Prez, meet Clint Didier, Republican candidate for Congress in Washington's 4th Congressional District, who tweeted his favorite thing to do for Earth Day.

Just a hunch, but we're guessing Didier's photo wouldn't win anything in the photo contest.

On Earth Day, focus is on green cities

Happy Earth Day to all!

​Each year, I'm asked why Earth Day matters and I'm truthfully exhausted with that argument. It just matters, okay!? (For a longer piece on that issue, read an old blog post called Why Earth Day Matters.)

One of the key reasons of its relevance is awareness and the Earth Day Network works hard each year to develop global themes. This time it is Green Cities:

Earth Day Network launched the Green Cities campaign in the fall of 2013 to help cities around the world become more sustainable and reduce their carbon footprint. Focused on three key elements – buildings, energy, and transportation – the campaign aims to help cities accelerate their transition to a cleaner, healthier, and more economically viable future through improvements in efficiency, investments in renewable technology, and regulation reform.

 ​

The campaign will also look at strategically placed cities and towns to organize grassroots efforts to improve local codes, ordinances, and policies that will help cities become model green cities.

After the jump, check the description on the three priorities - energy, green buildings, and transportation - and continue to follow the campaign HERE.

Compost Fair this Saturday at Finch Arboretum


​A big part of getting down to earth is getting dirty so check out the 36th semi-annual Compost Fair at the Finch Arboretum this Saturday, April 26. The Fair is being held as part of the Arbor Day Celebration and starts at 11 a.m. Attendees must arrive by 1:30 p.m. to complete all of the activities by the 2 p.m. end time.

Participants will learn how to create compost out of the “clean green” materials that result from their spring yard work and landscape trimming. Activity stations will provide hands-on experience and lots of information on the materials that can be composted, types of bins to use, and how to build and turn a pile. Finished compost is excellent material to recycle back into yards and gardens.

​The Fair is free and open to everyone. Spokane County attendees, with proof of county residence, can receive a free plastic compost bin after completing the activity stations. One bin per household is available. The bins are provided by Spokane Regional Solid Waste System and grant funds from the Washington State Department of Ecology. The Master Composters/Recyclers is a volunteer program sponsored by the Regional Solid Waste System.

 

 

It says here…

Earth Day would be the perfect occasion to launch a self-improvement regimen.

Is Earth Day Dying

Is Earth Day (which is today) dead? Maybe not, but if we’ve read the tree rings correctly, it may be dying. Which is why 2013 is the year we don’t need to save the Earth – we need to save Earth Day. Consider this: A new Huffington Post/YouGov poll finds Americans are less concerned about the environment now than when Earth Day began. A lot less. In 1971, the year after Earth Day was founded, 63 percent of Americans said it was “very important” to work to restore and enhance the national environment, according to an Opinion Research Corp. poll for President Richard Nixon. This year, only 39 percent of respondents said it was very important, according to a 2013 HuffPost/YouGov poll/Husna Haq, Christian Science Monitor. More here. (AP photo: Filipinos in colorful costumes participate in a protest against plans by a private developer for a reclamation project along Manila's Bay, as they celebrate Earth Day)

Question: Are you concerned re: reducing your carbon print? Why? Why Not?

On Earth Day, see the many faces of climate change

Happy Earth Day to all!

Each year, I'm asked why Earth Day matters and I'm truthfully exhausted with that argument. It just matters, okay!? (For a longer piece on that issue, read an old blog post called Why Earth Day Matters.)

One of the key reasons of its relevance is awareness and Earth Day has developed global themes for each year. This time it is The Face Of Climate Change. To help put that human face on climate change, the Earth Day Network collected images of people, animals, and places affected by climate change. It's not all doom and gloom: There are many images of people working hard to find a solution.

 

Check the Earth Day Network's description of the project:

Although climate change still seems a remote problem to some people, the reality is quite different. This past year marked many climate-change milestones. Arctic sea-ice cover reached a record low in September. The United States experienced its hottest year ever; this after the World Meteorological Organization announced that the first decade of this century was the hottest on record for the entire planet. Public perception of extreme weather events as “the new normal” grew, as unusual super storms rocked the Caribbean, the Philippines and the northeast United States; droughts plagued northern Brazil, Russia, China and two-thirds of United States; exceptional floods inundated Nigeria, Pakistan and parts of China; and more. Meanwhile, international climate change talks stagnated.

People born on Earth Day

Does anyone born on Earth Day ever bring that up or hear others mention it?

I wonder how many Earth Day babies will arrive today in the Spokane area.

Tuesday Video: What does clean water mean to you?

This is a belated post but the Spokane Riverkeeper put together a nice collection of interviews with people in Spokane telling their clean water stories at Earth Day 2012. It's all part of the Waterkeeper Alliance and the Spokane Riverkeeper's year long Defending Clean Water Campaign.

Check it out.


  

Mobilize the Earth

Before you require a green burial as referenced in Becky’s post, see what you can do to save our planet from all our own foolishness.  

Checkout the website of activities you can do to make a difference and if you are in the Washington, D.C. area – enjoy the Earth Day Rally on the National Mall.

(S-R archives: A computer-generated graphic provided by NASA shows images of objects in Earth's orbit that are currently being tracked.

Friday Quote: “What will you do to help the planet?”

Earth Day began in 1970 as a response to an oil spill. The idea was to push more people to think about the problems that were plaguing the country’s air and water as a way of making people care about solving them. These days, Earth Day is celebrated every year on April 22—this Sunday.

But in an age when we’re more likely to talk about “going green” instead of “saving the environment” Earth Day has become a commercial opportunity for the hoards of companies with green products to sell. We wanted to celebrate the day by thinking about what we might do, instead of what we might buy, in order to help the planet.

Looking ahead to Saturday’s Slice

Tomorrow's column is an insignificant bit of fluff, spun from the approach of Earth Day.

I am not mocking Earth Day. I'm just trying to entertain readers for 90 seconds.

But it's a virtual certainty that I will arrive at the office Monday morning and find at least one angry email or text. It will be from an earnest person who felt the need to lecture me about the importance of saving the planet. It will rebuke me for lacking gravitas. Or something.

So how should I respond?

A) "Thanks for sharing your thoughts on this. I will try to do better." B) "Did you write that email while having coffee Saturday morning with a girl you are trying to impress?" C) "I was not aware that The Slice column trying to have a bit of fun precluded The Spokesman-Review from addressing these issues elsewhere in the paper." D) "Look, kid. I'm sure you regard yourself as a big deal greenie and all. But I used to live in Vermont. I have seen major league progressives up close. Trust me, you're still wading in the kiddie pool. For one thing, by writing to me you are acknowledging that you spent some time with mainstream media, for God's sake." E) "The truth is, I have total respect for the goals of Earth Day. Always have. What I don't respect is unsigned mail." F) "As performance art goes, indignation isn't all that captivating." G) "At least your spelling is better than what I see in angry notes from radical conservatives."  H) Other.

Earth Day Spokane is on Saturday!

It's time to hit the streets this Saturday for Earth Day Spokane and if the forecast can be believed, it's going to be an awesome day for an outdoor event. For a little background on the organizers this year, check out this post from the Bainbridge Graduate Institute. We've got the full schedule, including information on the panels.



Get excited:

Booths open 10:00am-5:00pm

Earth Day Entertainment Lineup Main Stage: 10:00am – Introductions & speakers

11:15am – Mark Lee

12:30pm – Angela Marie Project

1:45pm – Civilized Animal

3:00pm – Citizen Arms

4:15pm – Folkinception

5::30pm – Angela Salmon

6:30pm – b radicals

8:00pm – Will Cruz

9:15pm – Damaged Goods

10:15pm – Malicious Mischief 

Ecobeats will be going on all day in the warehouse with local artists and music. There will be live djs and dancing after 7pm.

What’s your earliest Earth Day memory?

I can't remember anything from 1970, the first year.

But I recall that the next year everyone at my high school went outside and we listened to the governor of Vermont say protecting the environment was a good thing.

www.wikipedia.org

Earth Day Spokane unveils poster- we rejoice

 

It's baaaack. Earth Day Spokane 2012 will take place on April 21st on Maine Ave between Division St. and Browne St. Above is the official poster and as you can see, you might as well dropkick yourself for not showing up. Maybe that's a little harsh. But you'll be missing out on a great music lineup, interactive activities, the procession of the species and a party until midnight. In the words of the great Michael McDonald, yah mo b there.

For a little background on the organizers this year, check out this post from the Bainbridge Graduate Institute. Stay tuned for more details.

Tuesday Video: Mack Salmon reads “Ode to the Salmon in the river” on Earth Day




Mack and I go back. Way back. Yes, that's me taking photos like paparazzi. I should be so lucky because I truly was in the presence of greatness. A poet. Someone so "SpoCOOL." Who are you really Mack? Does Ciao Mambo have salmon-stromboli? Text after the jump from Riverspeak.

Earth Day review…

Good afternoon, Netizens…

 

Here we have the Unofficial Earth Day flag, by John McConnell: the blue marble on a blue background. It has come to represent Earth Day, which has been observed since April 22, 1970 and is now observed on April 22 each year by more than 500 million people and several national governments in 175 countries. It is coordinated by the nonprofit Earth Day Network, according to whom Earth Day is now "the largest secular holiday in the world, celebrated by more than a half billion people every year”.

 

I have a problem with Earth Day. If so many people in the United States are so enamored of saving Mother Earth, why is it they continue to re-elect politicians who clearly have a conflict of interest with Green awareness and/or become lobbyists for major corporations that pollute our air and water?

 

I find myself astounded beyond words at the number of lobbyists for corporations who mouth the phrases of Earth Day while still polluting madly away.

 

Dave

Read our winning Earth Day essay contributors


There has always been a gap in eco-literature: while plenty of non-fiction, “Sand Country Almanac,” “Silent Spring,” “End of Nature,” and” Field Notes from a Catastrophe,” has filled aisles, there are few great explorations of the environmental world and impending climatic and biological changes from a poet’s or fiction crafter’s point of view.

That was Paul Haeder in his column about our Earth Day Essay contributors- and how creative writing has the ability to advance the environmental discussion. Please take the time to read the winning submissions here in our documents tab.

Along the lines of eco-literature, I highly recommend News Of The Universe, a selection of poems by Robert Bly. This book was a turning point for me, highly informing my outlook on our natural world.

  

Earth Day Confessions


Confess your sins against earth and swear off your evil eco ways forever.

Do it.

Earth Day: 15 ways to celebrate agriculture



Talk about making everyday Earth Day. Danielle Nierenberg has an awesome bulleted list on sustainable agricultural that serves as a call to action. "It's a source of food and income for the world's poor and a primary engine for economic growth, "she writes. "It also offers untapped potential for mitigating climate change and protecting biodiversity, and for lifting millions of people out of poverty. Here are 15 solutions to guide farmers, scientists, politicians, agribusinesses and aid agencies as they commit to promoting a healthier environment and a more food-secure future." Read below:

1.  Guaranteeing the right to food. Guaranteeing the human right to adequate food — now and for future generations — requires that policymakers incorporate this right into food security laws and programs at the regional, national, and international level. Governments have a role in providing the public goods to support sustainable agriculture, including extension services, farmer-to-farmer transmission of knowledge, storage facilities, and infrastructure that links farmers to consumers.

Happy Earth Day - lunch is on you!

Picnic for the Planet is a celebration of the planet we live on, the food it provides and the people we share it with. In short, the planet does a lot for us — we should take it out for lunch. On and around Earth Day, people all around the world will be stepping outside and heading to their favorite outdoor spot to enjoy good food in the company of great people. For more information, log on to http://earthday.nature.org.

  

Hucks Poll: Hucks Nation Shoots First

  • Thursday Poll: You'd better be careful if you're considering breaking into a home in Hucks Nation. 143 of 192 respondents (74.45%) said they'd shoot someone who was breaking into their house. 33 of 192 respondents (17.19%) said they would not. 16 of 192 (8.33%) were undecided.
  • Today's Poll: Which observance means more to you — Earth Day or Good Friday/Easter?

Good Friday, Earth Day Converge Today

Holy Week this year has a surprising twist. The international observance of Earth Day and the Christian church’s celebration of Good Friday converge on April 22. To many in the church this will come as an unwelcome intrusion. I’ve learned in my years as a pastor not to schedule anything that would compete with the rhythms of Holy Week. I’m still reminded occasionally by the keepers of the church calendar about the year I agreed to do a wedding on the Saturday before Easter. I won’t do that again. For others, the threat of this coincidence goes much deeper than potential scheduling conflicts. They will see this as a sacred-secular fault line in an ongoing cultural struggle between two opposing ideologies/Craig Goodwin, pastor of Millwood Presbyterian Church of Spokane, special to CNN. More here. (SR file photo: Pastor Craig Goodwin's book, "Year of Plenty," chronicles the year he and his family consumed only things that were homemade, home grown, used or local.)

Question: Which observance will you participate in today — Good Friday or Earth Day? Or both?

Earth Day celebration this Saturday


Get ready Spokane: This Saturday is the 21st Annual Spokane Earth Day Festival from 11 a.m. to midnight on Main Street between Division and Browne and we've got you covered with a special section dedicated to all things Earth Day in the area. Similar to "Taking It To The Streets" last year, we're bringing back the party with music, vendors, food, kids projects and more.

“Being amidst places such as the Community Building, Main Market, Kizuri…it’s the perfect place to bring equity, community and sustainability together,” said Jessica Anundson, Earth Day Spokane chair, in Renee Sande's DTE article.

Speakers include Spokane Mayor Mary Verner, Councilman Richard Rush, Taylor Weech, coordinator of Youth Sustainability Council, and Brian Estes, proponent of local farmers markets, and others.

Sandpoint Earth Day Festival a hit with kids

ENVIRONMENT — Friday is Earth Day, and Sandpoint groups are making a point to get the whole family involved.

Sandpoint’s Earth Day Festival is set for 4 p.m.-8 p.m. at the Sandpoint Events Center (corner of Pine and Euclid).

Family activities include a talk by Earth Day co-founder Doug Scott, information from more than 20 local conservation groups and vendors, displays and games for the kids, electric car demos, great local food.

And then there's the no-host beer and wine bar.

The event is sponsored by Idaho Conservation League, Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness and Lake Pend Oreille Waterkeeper.

Info:  (208) 265-9565.

Earth Day essays due Wednesday by 5pm


Remember: Essays for Earth Day Spokane and Down To Earth are due Wednesday at 5pm.

To help commemorate Earth Day 2011, DowntoEarthNW.com is inviting writers and thinkers to put pencils to paper and share what Earth Day means to them in today’s world.

This will be the 41st anniversary of the global celebration, and its popularity and impact has certainly waxed and waned over the years. Sometimes it’s coincided with or led to specific legislation aimed at improving the environment.

Other years, it has sparked much excitement at very local levels, such as celebrations and advocacy in neighborhoods and communities. People get fired up to take action and make a difference while enjoying each other’s company, as was seen at “Taking it to the Streets,” Spokane’s 2010 block party.

This writing contest asks contributors to share why it is or isn’t valuable to continue to commemorate the planet at least once a year, the outlook on future celebrations, the balance between attracting corporate support and keeping it a grassroots event, and how to think globally while focusing locally. Or, as some espouse, is 40 years too long to simply celebrate, and is it time for stronger action and better organized strategies in combating threats to the planet?

2011 Earth Day Essay Contest

I'm proud to announce this wonderful opportunity from Down To Earth as Get Lit! and Earth Day approaches:

To help commemorate Earth Day 2011, DowntoEarthNW.com is inviting writers and thinkers to put pencils to paper and share what Earth Day means to them in today’s world.

This will be the 41st anniversary of the global celebration, and its popularity and impact has certainly waxed and waned over the years. Sometimes it’s coincided with or led to specific legislation aimed at improving the environment.

Other years, it has sparked much excitement at very local levels, such as celebrations and advocacy in neighborhoods and communities. People get fired up to take action and make a difference while enjoying each other’s company, as was seen at “Taking it to the Streets,” Spokane’s 2010 block party.

This writing contest asks contributors to share why it is or isn’t valuable to continue to commemorate the planet at least once a year, the outlook on future celebrations, the balance between attracting corporate support and keeping it a grassroots event, and how to think globally while focusing locally. Or, as some espouse, is 40 years too long to simply celebrate, and is it time for stronger action and better organized strategies in combating threats to the planet?

Plant a tree in Hillyard

The Merchants Committee is putting together a tree planting program in connection with Arbor Day (April 29). Young trees - mostly evergreens it sounds like - have been secured and the tree planting program will run begining on Earth Day (April 22).
Stay tuned for details.

Friday Quote

On Wednesday, the eve of the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, one of our favorite writers Andrew Revkin of Dot Earth and The New York Times wrote of a query he had sent out to some of his contacts, people he called “thinkers and doers” asking them this: “Regarding the successes and failures of the last 40 years in the effort called environmentalism, and the changed array of environmental challenges facing societies today, what would your short mission statement be for those seeking a fruitful human journey over the next 40?

He then posted responses in the comment section where some other great comments were posted as well.  A selection of those are below.  But what’s YOUR mission statement DTE readers?


“Looking back over nearly 40 years in energy and environment I see the greatest failure of US policy to be our inability to price any concerns into environment and energy. Some of those concerns — fuel economy, local air pollution from motor vehicles, appliance efficiency — can be addressed partly by standards, but as long as the actual use of energy or the release of pollution is free or underpriced, our economy will continue to run on empty.
Want to build nuclear power plants? How do you pay for them? Want to “drill drill drill”? Who is going to invest in significant off shore drilling with oil prices falling? The standard US answer has been subsidies and “incentives”. That has to change too. Have a sticker that let’s you drive in the carpool lane with your Prius. That’s a freebie you don’t need.
In other words, it’s time to go cold turkey on energy and environment, pay the real costs of what we take out of the planet (and what we leave behind). Its a big transition….”

- Lee Schipper - Senior Research Engineer, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center, Stanford University

“Our biggest need is a revitalized imagination. Our planetary failures result from many things — ignorance, greed, corruption — but I believe they stem first and foremost from our failure to imagine a better future for ourselves. Locked in mental commitment to the way things are, we routinely ignore the myriad ways we already know how to make them better. A bright, green future is still entirely possible, but we can’t build what we don’t imagine.” - Alex Steffen, http://www.worldchanging.com