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Egypt ‘on the edge of abyss’

Egyptian firefighters battle flames at the Giza governorate buildings that were stormed and torched by angry supporters of Egypt's ousted president, Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013.

CAIRO – With astonishing speed, Egypt has moved from a nation in crisis to a nation in real danger of slipping into a prolonged bout of violence or even civil war.

Egypt has become increasingly polarized since the Islamists rose to power following the 2011 revolution that ousted autocrat Hosni Mubarak. Fault lines touching key and potentially explosive issues like identity, the rights of Christians and other minorities, and democratic values have never been more prevalent.

The Muslim Brotherhood and its hard-line allies stand at one end of a bitter standoff with secularists, liberals, moderate Muslims and Christians.

That schism grew after President Mohammed Morsi, Egypt’s first democratically elected leader, was ousted in a July 3 military coup. But it was Wednesday’s deadly police raids – with armored bulldozers and security forces plowing through two protest camps – that will be remembered as a turning point when what had been primarily a political standoff erupted into bloodshed. Read more.

Do you think civil war in Egypt is likely?

Egypt ousts Morsi

An opponent of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi holds a poster with Arabic that reads, "leave," outside of the presidential palace, in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, July 3, 2013.

CAIRO — The armed forces ousted Egypt’s first democratically elected president Wednesday after just a year in power, installing a temporary civilian government, suspending the constitution and calling for new elections. Islamist President Mohammed Morsi denounced it as a “full coup” by the military.

After the televised announcement by the army chief, millions of anti-Morsi protesters in cities around the country erupted in delirious scenes of joy, with shouts of “God is great” and “Long live Egypt.” More here.

How will Morsi's ouster affect the situation in the Middle East?

Today’s fun video: Wisc. ain’t Tunisia or Egypt

 

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon - Thurs 11p / 10c
Crisis in Dairyland - Revenge of the Curds
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show Full Episodes Political Humor & Satire Blog The Daily Show on Facebook

 

Is anyone else irked by some television news accounts that try to find parallels to popular uprisings in the Middle East? If so, you'll enjoy Jon Stewart's opening monologue from Monday nights "The Daily Show" which takes up that issue at about 5:30 in. (The rest of it is worth watching, though.)

It's possible that folks at The Spokesman-Review are a bit sensitive about such lame comparisons because photographer Holly Pickett, a former colleague, has been on the scene in Tunisia, Egypt and now Morocco, and we wouldn't worry quite so much if she were shooting photos in Madison, Wisc.

Reporter Beaten, Sexually Assaulted

"60 Minutes" correspondent Lara Logan is shown last week covering the reaction in Cairo's Tahrir Square the day Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak stepped down. CBS News says Logan was attacked Friday, and suffered a brutal beating and sexual assault before being saved by a group of women and an estimated 20 Egyptian soldiers. She is recovering in a U.S. hospital. Logan, CBS News' chief foreign affairs correspondent, is one of at least 140 correspondents who have been injured or killed since Jan. 30 while covering the unrest in Egypt, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. Story here. (AP Photo/CBS News)

Question: Do you appreciate the courage that goes into gathering news in some of the world's hot spots after hearing of the pain and suffering suffering by CBS' correspondent Lara Logan?

Complex case came down to 15 cows

 

For some of the best legal minds in Washington state, a complicated Spokane divorce that spanned two continents and a bloody civil war came down to this: 15 cows.

The missing herd was part of several legal arguments before the Division III Court of Appeals as justices contemplated custody of two children. In the end their mother, who relocated to Spokane from Sudan, retained custody.

“This saga spans southern Sudan to Spokane, and features a civil war, refugees seeking to escape Africa and a failure of consideration because the war prevented payment of the remaining cows owed the bride’s father,” Judge Kevin Korsmo wrote in an opinion released last week. “Against this chaotic backdrop, the facts and law are often unclear and in some dispute.”

Read the rest of Tom Clouse's story here.

Egyptian president Mubarak resigns

For those following events in Egypt, here's a link to our latest AP story, which says Hosni Mubarak has  resigned as president and handed control to the military today after 29 years in power, bowing to a historic 18-day wave of pro-democracy demonstrations by hundreds of thousands. “The people ousted the president,” chanted a crowd of tens of thousands outside his presidential palace in Cairo.

Mubarak has resigned…

Good morning, Netizens…

According to two different sources, Egypt's Hosni Mubarak has resigned. The news announcement, which came at approximately 8:00 AM PST this morning from Egyptian Vice President Suleiman, is that Mubarak has indeed resigned. Omar Suleiman made the announcement on national TV on Friday.

While there is a great deal of speculation and angst involved in this transfer of power, and while I am certain the talking heads of the news media will give this more coverage than I am capable, I am hopeful that all goes peacefully.

Dave

Egypt Thugs Beat Anderson Cooper

CNN's Anderson Cooper and his camera crew were attacked and repeatedly punched by pro-government forces near Tahrir Square in Cairo today. "My team were set upon by the crowd," Cooper said on CNN this morning via telephone from the safety of a hotel balcony. "There was no rhyme or reason to it—it was just people looking for a fight, looking to make a point, and punching us." According to a Twitter post from George Hale, the English editor of the Ma'an news agency, who cited a CNN "manager," Cooper was punched "10 times in the head"/Gawker. More here.

Reaction?

Ramirez: Anubis

Michael Ramirez/Investor's Business Daily

Tuesday Video: Egyptians take back the streets

Watch this moving clip of protesters volunteering to clean up in Tahrir Square during the mass gatherings  against the Mubarak regime. Look for one of the men collecting trash with a sign in English saying "To Keep Egypt Clean." Sarah Goodyear at Grist observes, "This is what becomes possible when people feel a sense of ownership about the place where they live. This is what is happening in public spaces during this remarkable uprising."

I agree with her: It is beautiful to see.

  

Mubarak To Step Down This Fall

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak said on Tuesday he would not leave Egypt although he would step down from the presidency at the end of his term, due to end when the country holds a presidential election in September. Mubarak has faced a week of public and international pressure to step down from the role he has held for 30 years, culminating in a day when a quarter-million people turned in the largest protest yet to demand his ouster. (AP Photo/Egyptian state television via APTN)

Question: Can you figure out what's happening in Egypt?

How food fueled the revolution in Egypt



The correlation between food insecurity and political insecurity is never more true than the recent news out of Egypt. NPR reported on the role of food prices in the tumult:

Political unrest has broken out in Tunisia, Yemen, Egypt and other Arab countries. Social media and governmental policies are getting most of the credit for spurring the turmoil, but there's another factor at play.

Many of the people protesting are also angry about dramatic price hikes for basic foodstuffs, such as rice, cereals, cooking oil and sugar.

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations says its global food price index is at a record high, above even where it stood during the last food crisis three years ago. In early 2008, rising prices caused riots in dozens of countries — several of which are now seeing uprisings once again.


  

Column: Travel Renews Love For USA

Then, five months ago, all that doubt melted away. I spent the summer in Cairo and settled on three reasons why I love living in America: First of all, I adore the level of consistency here, and I’m not talking about chain stores. I’m talking about that cozy feeling of being 99 percent sure that you won’t be glued to the toilet for four days whenever you dine out or buy groceries. Second of all, I love aimless walks and bike rides. I learned pretty quickly that walking was not an acceptable mode of transportation in Cairo. Traffic is so horrendous because the city has deteriorated to the point where no one wants to be outside. … Lastly, and most importantly, is freedom. I lost my sense of independence as a woman. … As a single woman you get proposed too, stared at, followed, teased and whispered to/Noura E. Alfadl-Andreasson, North Idaho College Sentinel. More here. (AP file photo: Egyptian boys watch girls pass by at Nile bank in Cairo.)

Question: Has travel to foreign countries deepened your love for this country?

Obama cast in stone?

When President Obama was in Egypt last week, he came across this hieroglyphic that looked like, well, like him.

Uh oh. If the folks trying to prove Obama can’t be president because isn’t a U.S. citizen because he doesn’t have a real birth certificate find out about this, they’ll have a whole new line of inquiry to set up. See, it turns out he doesn’t have a birth certificate because he was really born in ancient Egypt. They’ll need to check out the papyrus records under the name Kar.

The photo comes courtesy of Anderson Cooper’s AC360 blog on CNN .