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MikeK: To UnFriend Or Not To Unfriend

Coeur d’Alene City Councilman Mike Kennedy drives Hard Right Republicans in Kootenai County cuh-razy. Kennedy has committed the unpardonable sin of being a Democrat in a nonpartisan office in licorice-red North Idaho. In 2009, Kennedy squeaked past Republican-backed Jim Brannon by five votes – and then withstood a lengthy legal challenge to win by three votes. Now, he’s one of the four city elected officials targeted for recall by organizers tied to the county Republican Party. Kennedy has handled much of the partisan hatred with his humor intact. On his Facebook wall last week he wondered about social media etiquette during a recall attempt. He knows, for example, he has befriended, hired or helped the children of some of the individuals who have signed petitions for his recall (which are public). Facebooked Mike, tongue firmly cheeked: “Should you unfriend them on Facebook? How else do you handle it?” Maybe Facebook should install a dislike button?/DFO, Huckleberries. More here.

Question: What type of "Facebook Friends" do you unfriend?

Taggart: They’re All Wrong

John Austin is wrong; Dan Gookin is wrong; Tony Berns is wrong; Mary Souza is wrong; Kathy Sims is wrong; Mike McDowell is wrong; Cliff Hayes is wrong; and any other person who has stated an opinion regarding the tax impact of urban renewal districts on taxpayers located outside of any district is wrong. How is that possible? How can everyone be wrong when talking about the impact of tax increment financing? Because it is nearly impossible to accurately analyze the true tax impact of any urban renewal district. To do so would require the ability to travel back in time and see what would have happened if the district had never been created. This could be called the George Bailey effect, after the Jimmy Stewart character in "It's a Wonderful Life." What would Coeur d'Alene look like if there had never been any urban renewal district created? No one knows. We do know it would not be the same, but how would it differ? Again, no one knows. Many have opinions, opinions based on assumptions, assumptions that are based on few actual facts/Tom Taggart, Coeur d'Alene Press op-ed piece. More here.

Thoughts?

Which sites are the most liked and most disliked by business owners?

Website 99designs recently polled 1,500 small business owners, start-ups, entrepreneurs and design decision-makers on graphic design and its importance to their business.

The results make for a decent read. We feel a post is warranted since we also saw recent stories in the WSJ that suggest many businesses are now hungry not for MBAs, but people who are saavy in design and product development. (Story at WSJ.com may be behind a paid content wall.)

The survey results that are easiest to digest involve colors and popularity.

Namely, the survey asked for which colors owners associate with success. Answer: Blue most associated with succes. Fifty-seven percent said blue is their idea of success; the second most cited color is green (35%) followed by white (32%), black (29%) and red (21%). Purple was the color males least often associate with success, while women were least likely to select orange.

Then, on which brands are seen as having best logo and best website, the results are predictable:

  • Apple topped the lists for best logo and best website; also on the best logo were Nike, Coca-Cola and FedEx.
  • Most disliked logos and websites: Wal-Mart, Microsoft, Pepsi, IBM and Google.
  • Best websites: Apple, Amazon, Google, Facebook and Nike.
  • Worst websites: Wal-Mart, Yahoo, Facebook, MySpace and Microsoft.

MySpace, really?  Who looks at MySpace?
  

Facebook photos ID robbery suspects

A woman identified her cousin as her robber's accomplice after seeing photos of the two together on Facebook, according to Spokane police.

The woman was sitting in her living room at 1624 E. Cataldo Ave. with her cousin, Shakayla F. Delcambre, 20, Thursday about 12:45 a.m. when a man holding a red bandanna that covered what she believed to be a handgun entered and demanded money from her, according to court documents.

The man took her wallet from her purse and put her in a choke hold before she broke free and he ran out the front door, police say.

The woman realized Delcambre knew her attacker when he saw photos of her with him on Facebook, police say. The woman noted to police that Delcambre had borrowed her cellphone to make a call prior to the robbery.

Police identified the robber as James J. Williams, 28. Another woman, who said she was assaulted by Delcambre, told police she picked him up after the robbery and he removed a pullover jacket and black body armor while in her van. She allowed police to search her van and her house for evidence.

Police viewed the Facebook photos of Delcambre and Williams, according to court documents.

Williams is in jail on $150,000 bond for first-degree robbery. Delcambre is jailed on $25,000 bond for first-degree robbery and first-degree assault.
  

Facebook Helps Catch A Thief

Here's a tip: When you steal something, don't post a picture of yourself on Facebook with the stolen item. Especially when that item is a 70-pound, fiberglass cow that's a local icon and has been the subject of news stories. "It's back home," said Tracy Gagnon, owner of the antique, brown and white cow that was stolen April 27 from the front of the Paris Flea Market, 1815 N. Fourth St. The cow was recovered by police on a porch near Fourth Street and Coeur d'Alene Avenue on Wednesday morning. Police were tipped off by a caller, whose daughter saw photos of the suspect posing with the cow on his Facebook account. Detectives found the cow partially hidden under a blanket. Brandon M. Hiza, 23, Coeur d'Alene, was arrested for grand theft, a felony, and was being held without bond in Kootenai County jail. His first court appearance is scheduled today/Bill Buley, Coeur d'Alene Press. More here.

Question: Have you ever posted something on Facebook that you wished you hadn't?

Facebook Wants Your Liver

Facebook is about "connecting and sharing" - especially now it can help you donate your internal organs, Mark Zuckerberg announced today. Describing it as "a life-saving initiative", the tousle-haired CEO officially announced a special button for people wanting to tell their friends that they are organ donors. "Became a organ donor" has been added to the list of health-related life events that a Facebooker can add to their "Timeline" alongside "buying new glasses" and "weight loss". Logging your philanthropic wishes for your internals has been made easier and will automatically sync to your permanent profile information making it easier for your friends to see/Anna Leach, The Register. More here. (AP/ABC photo: Robin Roberts, host of "Good Morning America," right, talks to Mark Zuckerberg, the founder and CEO of Facebook, during an interview in Menlo Park, Calif.)

Question: Do you want to share your organs with Facebook Friends?

Pic of cop car gas theft leads to arrest

JENKINS, Ky. (AP) — There it was on Facebook for all to see — Michael Baker with a gas can, a siphon hose stuck into a police cruiser in eastern Kentucky and a middle finger raised.

Among those who saw it were Jenkins police, who arrested 20-year-old Baker on Monday and charged him with theft by unlawful taking.

Baker told WYMT-TV ( http://bit.ly/HUTwfV ) in Hazard there wasn't much fuel in the car to siphon and the stunt on Friday was intended as a joke. Baker's girlfriend took the photo and posted it.

Police didn't laugh. Chief Allen Bormes says that if Baker would steal from police, he'd steal from "just about anybody."

Authorities say they plan to buy lockable gas caps.

Marine Faces Ouster For Obama Dis

Marine Sgt. Gary Stein, who is facing dismissal for posting critical comments about President Obama on Facebook, accused the review board that recommended he be discharged of basing its decision on "personal opinion" Tuesday. "I believe it was more based on personal opinion on the three members than it was based on the legalities on the case. They denied four expert witnesses that were there to talk about the legalities. They didn't even want to hear or take written testimony from them," said Stein on CNN's "Starting Point" Tuesday morning. … The three-member review board recommended last week that Stein receive an "other than honorable" discharge, which would include a loss of benefits and reduction in rank, for saying he would not follow orders he believed unlawful and for calling Obama a "domestic enemy" on his "Armed Forces Tea Party" Facebook page/Geneva Sands, The Hill. More here. (AP photo)

Question: Should Marine Sgt. Stein be booted from the Armed Services for posting critical remarks about President Barack Obama?

Do you agree that Facebook deserves to be slapped for ignoring women?

Don't get Ultraviolet mad.

The women's group called Ultraviolet has come out swinging at Facebook, saying the media and social network company has shown immense gender blindness. The Ultraviolet announcement on Thursday demanded Facebook appoint at least one woman to its board before the company goes public in the coming weeks.

It's also asking Facebook users to sign its online petition at this link.

The announcement made a good point: about 58% of Facebook users are women but the company, based in Northern California, has no women on its board.

Said Nita Chaudhary, a co-founder of Ultraviolet:  "The fact that a company as large as Facebook with a massive global reach does not have a single woman on their board is nothing short of shameful. Facebook owes it success and makes a ton of money off of its women users. 

"Women are responsible for nearly two-thirds of the sharing that happens on the site. In addition, women account for more than 70% of daily fan activity on the site, which is a huge source of revenue for the company." 

On the surface, who can argue with their claim? 

Idaho Fish and Game can’t Face(book) the online ugliness

WILDLIFE AGENCIES — After wading briefly into the world of social media, the Idaho Fish and Game Department has had to "unfriend" itself on Facebook.

Comment threads on issues such as wolves got so ugly, it was taking too much effort to monitor the traffic.

"We were spending way too much time looking at it. We had some employees who were trying to moderate [Facebook] in the middle of the night, which was crazy," Mike Keckler, chief of IDFG's Bureau of Communications told the Boise Weekly. "I was doing that for a while, and realized I was literally losing sleep over this."

Read onfor the rest of the Boise Weekly report.

Facebook: Say No To Snoopy Bosses

Has an employer or potential employer ever requested access to your Facebook account? If so, Facebook itself advises you to just say no. Responding to growing complaints from employees over the practice, Facebook made its own position quite clear in a post published today. Noting an increase in the number of such requests from employers, the social network said they undermine both the security and the privacy of the user and the user's friends. And the practice can put employers themselves at risk. Companies making such requests may not have the right policies or training in place to deal with private information, according to Facebook/CNET News. More here.

Question: Have you ever been asked by your boss or an authority figure to provide your password?

Employers Want Your FB Passwords

Studies have shown that Facebook can be a useful hiring tool. Just a 5- to 10-minute perusal of a user’s profile can net more information than a basic personality test. It’s no wonder employers head to the site to check out prospective hires. But one problem remains: Many users are now going private, cutting off their profiles from outside viewers. As a result, a new trend has emerged. Employers are reportedly now asking job applicants for Facebook passwords. Is this a good idea? Can you legally ask a job applicant for a Facebook password? Even though law professor Orin Kerr considers the practice to be “an egregious privacy violation,” it appears to be legal/Stephanie Rabiner, Reuters. More here. (AP file photo: A Kennewick teen reads her Facebook wall in the local library earlier this month)

Question: Would you provide your Facebook password to a prospective employer, if asked to do so?

Thief posts Facebook pic of judge’s loot

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Authorities in South Florida say a man is facing charges after he was seen in a photo on Facebook holding a judge's stolen nameplate.

Twenty-one-year-old Steven Mulhall was arrested Thursday on violation of probation charges.

Broward County Sheriff Al Lamberti told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel that Mulhall pried the $40 nameplate from the courtroom door of Broward Circuit Judge Michael Orlando. He says Mulhall has multiple petty theft convictions and now faces felony charges.

Arrest reports show the nameplate was stolen last month. Authorities received a tip that Mulhall took the nameplate and that the picture could be found on his girlfriend's Facebook page.

The nameplate will be returned to the judge.

A phone number wasn't available for Mulhall.

Say what! Self-filmed suspect back in jail

This is a screen shot of a video vehicle prowling suspect Nathan Calvert posted on his Facebook page.

A car prowling suspect who escaped from Geiger Corrections Center now faces an additional felony charge.

Nathan John Calvert is to be arraigned next week on a charge of second-degree escape.

He was arrested Feb. 23 in the area of 2900 E. Cleveland Ave. after escaping Geiger on Feb. 11.

 Calvert, 28, already is charged with residential burglary, possession of a stolen firearm and three counts of second-degree theft for a theft spree that included him posting a video of himself with suspect stolen property on his Facebook page.

The alleged spree ended when an attorney caught him in his truck. Spokane Valley police say Calvert told detectives he committed 30 to 40 vehicle prowlings and garage burglaries a night for two to three weeks throughout Spokane County. 

Past coverage:

Dec. 14: Cops: Man's Facebook post is evidence

We’re Getting Unfriendly On Facebook

Whether it's pruning friends lists, removing unwanted comments or restricting access to their profiles, Americans are getting more privacy-savvy on social networks, a new report found. The report released Friday by the Pew Internet & American Life Project found that people are managing their privacy settings and their online reputation more often than they did two years earlier. For example, 44 percent of respondents said in 2011 that they deleted comments from their profile on a social networking site. Only 36 percent said the same thing in 2009/Associated Press. More here.

Question: Do you allow angry comments to remain on your Facebook wall?

Laptop Shooting Dad Video Goes Viral

This frame grab taken from an undated video posted on YouTube Feb. 8 by Tommy Jordan of Albemarle, N.C. shows Jordan answering his teenage daughter's Facebook complaints by firing several rounds from his handgun into his daughter's laptop her computer as it lies on the ground. More than 26 million people have seen the video in which Jordan reads and replies to his daughter's rant before emptying his .45-caliber pistol into her laptop. AP story here. (AP Photo/YouTube Channel of Tommy Jordan)

Question: Unless you've been living under a rock, you've seen this video. Did Tommy Jordan do the right thing by responding to his daughter via video & then shooting her laptop computer?

Shopko launches Facebook contest to award $10,000 to worthy charity

Spokane's Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery is among the possible winners in a contest started by national retailer Shopko.

Called "Choose the Charity," the contest will run through March 12 and allows Facebook users to cast votes for a favorite charity. The winning charity will receive a $10,000 donation, organizers said.

Shopko's Facebook page is www.facebook.com/shopko. The winner will be announced on March 13.

In addition to Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery, other eligible charities on the Facebook page ballot are:

  • The Children's Center (Salt Lake City, Utah)
  • House of Hope (Green Bay, Wisc.)
  • One World Community Health Centers (Omaha, Neb.)
  • St. Marcus School (Milwaukee, Wisc.)

Those were selected, a Shopko press release said, based on high quality of services that they provide, the strong support that they enjoy in their communities, and  track records of proven results.

High Noon: Facebook Divorce Notice?

On the Huffington Post, Abby Tolchinsky writes: "As a divorce mediator and lawyer, sometimes I feel like I've heard it all. I am terribly hard to shock. And yet, yesterday something shocked me: a divorce announcement via email. What's more, it was both thoughtful and tasteful. The thrust of the email: We have been married a long time, we will always be friends and parent peacefully together. Please let me know if you notice anything when your child is with mine about which I should be concerned." I suppose in retrospect, the initial shock wasn't warranted. After all, if social media has been a contributing component of so many enormous world shifts (see Arab Spring), then why not as a means of announcing the most intimate of life changes?

Question: Should you announce your divorce on Facebook?

Hundreds ask Vt. to keep prank police pig

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Remember the pig hidden within the decal on the doors of some Vermont State Police cruisers?

There's now a movement under way to keep it there.

But it turns out there was more wrong with that image than just the white pig hidden as a splotch on the cow, made to resemble one of Vermont's ubiquitous Holsteins. State law requires that the cow in the crest be red — not red and white — as a tribute to the hardy Devon cattle first brought to Vermont by English settlers.

"What I would really like is for the governor to just leave the pigs on the car. That's the bottom line, at no expense to anybody," said Barre musician Cid Sinclair, who created the Facebook page "Save the Vermont Pigs." The site has been liked by more than 500 people. Two hundred people have signed an online petition, he said.

"No harm, no foul, take it as an opportunity to have some fun," Sinclair said. "We live in pretty bleak times and it's pretty rough. We have an opportunity to laugh together as one, as Vermonters."

The pigs in the 16-inch decal were first noticed last week by a state police trooper who was washing his car. The crest is believed to have been altered by a Vermont prison inmate who made the image several years ago. The pigs, a derogatory term for police, are on about 30 cruisers.

The Department of Corrections said last week that new decals would be made at a cost of $780. But state police spokeswoman Stephanie Dasaro said Thursday that so far none of the offending decals had been removed.

She said officials had been made aware of the state law that requires the cow in the crest to be red but had been told it was OK to use the existing emblem.

"We value our emblem and what it represents for our state and our agency and we want to be in compliance," Dasaro said.

Facebook unfriending leads to murders

MOUNTAIN CITY, Tenn. (AP) — A father who was upset after a Tennessee couple deleted his adult daughter as a friend on Facebook has been charged in the shooting deaths of the couple, authorities said Wednesday.

 The victims had complained to police that Marvin's Potter's daughter was harassing them after they deleted her as a friend on the social networking site, Johnson County Sheriff Mike Reece said Wednesday.

Potter, 60, (pictured left) has been charged with two counts of first-degree murder last week's slayings of Billy Payne Jr. and his girlfriend, Billie Jean Hayworth. The couple was shot to death in their Mountain City home in the far northeast corner of the state. Their 8-month-old baby was found unharmed in Hayworth's arms.

"It's a senseless thing," the sheriff said.

 Authorities have been involved other cases where Potter's daughter, Jenelle Potter, believed she had been slighted by someone.

Marvin Potter's friend, Jamie Curd, has also been charged in the killings. Curd, 38, (pictured right) had romantic feelings for Jenelle Potter, 30, the sheriff said.

Potter and Curd were arraigned Wednesday. Potter asked for time to hire an attorney while Curd was assigned a public defender who did not immediately return a phone message.

Assistant District Attorney General Matthew Roark said Curd's initial bond was raised to $1.5 million while Roark agreed to put off a bond hearing for Potter until next week, when he is expected to have an attorney. Potter remains jailed on his initial $200,000 bond.

The victims lived with Billy Payne Sr., who was the last person to see them alive. He told detectives he saw Hayworth get up to feed the baby before he left for work at about 5:30 a.m. on Jan. 31.

The slayings were discovered about five hours later when a former neighbor stopped by to pick up mail the family would save for him.

The younger Payne was found in his bedroom, and Hayworth was found in the baby's room.

It’s weird to “like” death

In our EndNotes column today, we answered a question whether it's appropriate to send condolences on Facebook. The answer: It depends. For teens and other big Facebook users, sure. For those in generations who expect a handwritten card, no.

After she proofread my story, newsroom colleague Kimberly pointed out how weird it is on Facebook to click "like" when people share bad news, such as a death in the family. Agreed. Facebook needs a "sorry" button, perhaps.

How do you respond to someone's sad news on Facebook?

(S-R archives photo)

Clark: Facebook User Nails Idiocy

There’s a vital message to the planet contained in the story headlined: “Man hardly fazed by nail in his brain.” And no, the vital message has nothing to do with any misplaced nail. Heck, X-ray all the bozos we elect year after year. I’m betting half of them at least have loose screws rattling around inside their cranial cavities. How else do you account for the ridiculous ways they waste our money? But getting back to our point …Dante Autullo, a 32-year-old Illinois man, was using a nail gun in his workshop when the device somehow went off on his noggin. … But as riveting as this not-so handyman’s ordeal is, here’s the real shocker. And I quote: “… he posted the X-ray on Facebook during his ambulance ride between hospitals for surgery.” My friends, the social media is a social disease/Doug Clark, SR. More here. (This photo provided by Christ Medical Center & Hope Children's Hospital in Oak Lawn,, Ill. on Friday, Jan. 20, 2012 shows an X-ray of a nail embedded in Dante Autullo's brain)

Question: Do any of your Facebook Friends go too far in sharing personal information?

Northeast Spokane Facebook connections

If you are on Facebook already and want to stay in touch with what's going on in and around Hillyard, here are some Facebook pages for you to follow:

The Greater Hillyard Business Association can be found here.

The Hillyard Festival Association can be found here.

Hillyard's main Facebook page is here.

Northeast Community Center's (not very frequently updated) Facebook page is here.

I'm sure there are community organization Facebook pages out there that I don't know about - let me know if I forgot some.

South Hill connections on Facebook

If you are on Facebook and curious about what's going on not just in the South Perry District but in nearby neighborhoods, here are a few Facebook sites for you to follow:

The Manito Neighborhood Site can be found here.

Spokane Southie, a blog written by a South Hill Woman, can be found here.

The Manito/Cannon Hill Neighborhood Council can be found here.

The South Perry Fair and Parade Facebook site can be found here. It's often used to announce neighborhood news during the off season.

And here is the link to the East Central Community Center's Facebook page.

I'm sure I missed some community organizations - let me know.

Say what! Filmed theft suspect arraigned

This is a screen shot of a video vehicle prowling suspect Nathan Calvert posted on his Facebook page.

 An alleged car prowler who posted a video of himself with suspected stolen property on his Facebook page pleaded not guilty Tuesday to six felony charges.

Nathan John Calvert, 28, remains in jail on a no-bail state Department of Corrections probation hold after his arraigned before Superior Court Judge Annette Plese on charges of residential burglary, possession of a stolen motor vehicle, vehicle prowling and three counts of second-degree theft.

His trial is scheduled to begin Feb. 21.

Calvert was arrested Dec. 9 after an attorney caught him in his truck. Spokane Valley police say Calvert had a stolen Jeep filled with stolen property.

Calvert told detectives he committed 30 to 40 vehicle prowlings and garage burglaries a night for two to three weeks throughout Spokane County, police say.

Detectives expect to use Calvert's Facebook video as evidence. The video shows Calvert in a vehicle he describes as a Jeep. He focuses on stolen property in the back of the vehicle and says he hasn't decided what he's going to do yet. Then he raps.

Check out the video here.

Facebook Timeline Going Live Soon

Yesterday, Facebook rolled out its new Timeline feature to the masses. This ultra-illustrative, chronological listing of posts, photos, shared links, check-ins, and more is a radically different arrangement than the Facebook profile you’ve been used to. And now that your life can be exposed for everyone to see — and scrutinize — you may be interested in curating the new interface. Once you’ve activated Facebook Timeline (go here to do so), you’ve got seven days to tweak it to make sure it’s just how you like before it goes live for everyone to see\Christina Bonnington, Wired Gadget Lab. More here. (AP file photo for illustrative purposes)

Question: Do you consider the new timeline to be a bother or worth the effort?

Thank you, 14Four. Improved sobriety test protects you from reckless tweets

The Step 2 tagline on the online version of the Social Media Sobriety Test sums it up:

"Choose your hours of intoxication."

About a year ago the coders who work at Spokane creative agency 14Four had fun making a “social media sobriety kit” that kept people from posting drunken comments on sites like Facebook or Twitter.

The test was just upgraded by 14Four with a holiday theme.  As the new version gains blog and broadcast notoriety, those at 14Four who've worked on the sobriety test project say it's been a great showcase of their talents and skills.

In the world of advertising and creative marketing, half the battle is winning eyeballs. And that has clearly happened with the sobriety test, said Jeff Oswalt, 14Four’s president.

Last year’s version involved just a web browser tool that set time limits when one could post messages or photos. The tests themselves were simple: follow a moving object onscreen with a mouse or type the alphabet backwards.

The new version comes with holiday-themed warnings, such as: “Before you hand out copies of your backside or tell your in-laws how you really feel, download the Holiday Party Sobriety Test and protect yourself, from yourself.”

It also added mobile versions for Android and iPhone; you can download the free sobriety app from iTunes.

Cops: Man’s Facebook post is evidence

This is a screen shot of a video vehicle prowling suspect Nathan Calvert posted on his Facebook page. View the video here.

Spokane Valley police say a video posted by a car prowling suspect on his Facebook page that features suspected stolen loot will be used as evidence against him.

"It'd be kind of silly for us not to," said Sgt. John Nowels.

The video, posted two days before his arrest, shows Nathan John Calvert in a vehicle he describes as a Jeep. He focused on a large amount of property in the back and passenger seat and said he hasn’t “really figured out what I’m going to do yet.”

Police believe it's the same stolen Jeep that contained about 100 items of stolen property when Calvert, 28, was arrested Friday after an attorney caught him in his truck and held him until police arrived. Police also suspect Calvert used stolen equipment to film and post the video, which they learned of from The Spokesman-Review.

A woman who identified herself as the mother of Calvert's son commented on the video, criticizing Calvert and accusing him of giving their son a stolen bike.

Nowels said that comment prompted detectives to track the bike to the woman's mother, who said she suspected it was stolen.

"We do have a bike we know got stolen by him that he wouldn't tell us what he did with," Nowels said. "Turns out it's a totally different bike."

But detectives haven't found a police report that mentions the bike.

"We can't really go take it until we know it's stolen or not," Nowels said.

Valley police have posted photos of the unclaimed stolen goods on the department's Facebook page. Calvert told detectives he committed 30 to 40 vehicle prowlings and garage burglaries a night for two to three weeks.

He's in jail on new felony charges and a Washington Department of Corrections probation hold and is due in Superior Court this afternoon on charges of residential burglary, possession of a stolen motor vehicle, vehicle prowling and three counts of second-degree theft.

Jail employees have not responded to a request to interview Calvert.

GreenCupboards offers green toy giveaway and donations to Toys For Tots

Spokane's fast-growing retailer, GreenCupboards.com, is using Facebook to encourage its followers to help spread some toy cheer this holiday.

People visiting GreenCupboards' Facebook page through Dec. 31 are eligible to win a daily "green" toy.
 
The company, funded privately and based downtown, will match that toy and donate the toy to the area's holiday Toys for Tots! campaign.
 
The illustration here shows the full scope of the toys being given away.
 
On Dec. 31, whowever wins that day's lottery is able to pick any toy from the GreenCupboards.com giveaway, said Lauren Beck, the company's marketing coordinator.
 
Shoppers visiting GreenCupboards.com also get a Toys for Tots donation option on the shopping cart, allowing any shopper to donate during their online checkout.