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Triploids to sweeten fishing lakes for Fathers Day

FISHING — Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife fish hatchery crews will be stocking 10,000 triploid rainbow trout in 20 lakes just before Father’s Day weekend, June 15-16.

“This is the second straight year we’ve stocked trout before Father’s Day, and this year we’ve doubled the number of fish and added six more lakes to the list,” said Chris Donley, WDFW Inland Fish Program manager.

Selected lakes in this region to be planted with the bright 1.5-pound trout include: 

  • West Medical in Spokane County, 1,250 triploids.
  • Williams Lake in Spokane County, 400 triploids.
  • Diamond Lake in Pend Oreille County, 600 triploids.
  • Park lake in Grant County, 400 triploids.
  • Alta Lake in Okanogan County, 350 triploids.
  • Conconully Reservoir in Okanogan County, 750 triploids.

Of course, previously stocke fish will be providing good fishing in other lakes. The triploids simply boost the excitement at the chosen lakes.

Fishing licenses can be purchased online.

See fish stocking details, by county and lake.

Another Neck Tie For Father’s Day

It’s Father’s Day. I’m gonna get a necktie. I have for every Father’s Day since I became one, and so have you — even if the only place you have to wear a tie is on the tractor. Don’t blame your unimaginative loved ones. A necktie is a gift for a guy who has everything, and that pretty much describes you and me, fella. Look around: Your life is choked with stuff. Your garage is always full, your truck is always full, your tool box is always full, your tackle box is always full, your closet is always full, your gun cabinet is always full, and by the look of your belly hanging over your belt, you’re always full. Say it with me one time: You don’t need anything/Steve Crump, Twin Falls Times News. More here.

Question: What did you get for Father's Day?

There are a couple of ways to respond

When a nonfather is wished “Happy Father's Day” by stranger.

He can smile and say “Thanks” or something along those lines.

Or he can say, “What? Have you heard something?”

Father’s Day

Here's a picture of my late father with his B-24 crew in North Africa. (He's in the front row, on the far right.) You can tell that this photo is from early in the war because the Liberator behind them was not fitted with a nose turret. Memorable name, though.

www.b24bestweb.com 

Just wondering

In Spokane, what year was the peak when it came to giving neckties as Father's Day presents?

How about nationally?

Crapo: Father, Take Care Of Yourself

In a column for Father's Day, U.S. Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, urges men to take better care of their health: “Fathers take care of us, and one Father’s Day idea is to encourage them to also take care of themselves. Men often pay too little attention to their health until a serious problem emerges. According to the Men’s Health Network, men have a higher death rate for most of the leading causes of death, including heart disease and cancer. Additionally, the life expectancy of men is approximately five years lower than the life expectancy for women. Maintaining healthy lifestyles and preventive efforts are fundamental to changing these statistics. Men’s health concerns affect far more than men alone. They affect families and loved ones.” More here. (SR file photo: William Jackson Smart, father of Sonora Smart Dodds, the founder of Father's Day)

Question (for fathers): Do you get an annual physical & otherwise take care of yourself for your family's sake?

Extra trout stocked for Fathers Day

FISHING – Williams Lake south of Cheney is getting spiced with a late plant of 365 triploid rainbows this week to help perk up the fishing for Father’s Day weekend.

Williams is among 14 lakes in the state getting supplemental hatchery plants for the weekend, said Chris Donley, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Inland Fish Program manager.

The triploid trout are sterile rainbows that average one-and-a-half pounds each. Anglers say the fishing at Williams has continued to be good even without the extra fish.

The 5,000 trout being stocked across the state this week are in addition to about 42,000 triploids stocked in 117 lakes across the state earlier this year.

Fishing licenses can be purchased online.

Fish stocking details, by county and lake.

Are you one of Steve Garvey’s children?

Yes, that's impolite.

But considering what we learned long ago about the onetime Los Angeles Dodgers slugger's off-field antics, it seems fair to ask.

Did he father some children here while a member of the Spokane Indians?

If Garvey was your dad, you would be about 42 now. You might have a prominent chin.

If you think it is a possibility, ask your mother if she used to be a baseball fan.

Remember, Father's Day — the special occasion invented in Spokane — is just 31 days away. But there's still time to pick out a nice card.

Fathers Day treat: Dad-daughter highlight on Mount Whitney

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OUTDOOR FAMILIES — A few years ago, as he sensed the inevitable changes ahead, Edwyn Hill of Spokane planned a challenging outdoor adventure with his oldest daughter, Whitney.

He wanted to end the teenage chapter in her upbringing with an exclamation point before she moved on to college.

I had the pleasure of tagging along with them to California as the Hills climbed Mount Whitney, the highest peak in the lower 48 states.  The trek was a high point in Wyn's and Whitney's relationship.

Turn up the sound on your computer and check out the video slide show as I document how the Great Outdoors prepared Wyn for an even bigger transition that transpired five years later.

Happy Father’s Day

I wrote this for my Dad, Don Rice, who passed away December 19, 2003, former features editor for the Spokane Daily Chronicle.  I will be forever grateful that I sent this letter to my Dad the summer before he died.  That is a blessing all on its own for me.  I wish we all could say our heart's wishes to our loved ones before they are no longer around to hear them.

Happy Father's Day everyone.  Please enjoy my humble contribution:

 

Happy Father's Day

 
As Father’s Day arrives, I am remembering my Dad, gone now for 18 years, which I find almost unreal, because memories of him are more like yesterday! Dad was my hero throughout my life, however, every now and then he would show his imperfections and become merely human for a moment – like when one of us crossed his path between hiseasy chair and a football game on the television set. Then he was crochety and focused on that line of site that we momentarily interrupted. We grew accustomed to crawling on the floor to get to our destination.

But more often than not, he was all-knowing, all-being – protecting me from any danger. He was my major influence to becoming an independent thinking woman, at the cusp of women finding their own path – in 1969. He always said I could be anything, do anything, I wanted and succeed.

There are so many things I am grateful for and thankful for, that my Dad was responsible for:

Thank you, Dad:

• For letting me dance, my feet on yours, clear until I was 16;
• Your invention of home made toys – like the sling shots we each had made out of old tires;
• The swing you made in a tree out back for my two sons to enjoy. I have a series of pictures, frame by frame of them going up, up, up, leaning back, side-by-side, and laughing out loud with huge glee;
• The infamous “short cuts” on our many Sunday drives, one time driving up a little tiny one-lane cliff side dirt road, for miles and miles, only to have to BACK DOWN for what seemed like eternity;
• Routinely making Sunday breakfast;
• The time it snowed so deep that you made an igloo for us that lasted for two whole months!
• The same year, you made the fantastic toboggan run behind our house that was so sleek and fast that it would propel our six-man toboggan down and around the barn, and whoosh back up to the top – we only had to walk it over to the starting point and do it all again.
• Making up the rule not to sing at the kitchen table or the window would fall on our heads. (Says something about how happy we were that you would have to make up a rule to keep us from singing at the kitchen table!)
• Making up the Quiet Game (again at the kitchen table) where the game was lost at the first peep from a child, so we would spend delicious minutes making faces and sticking out our tongues at hapless siblings until one would burst out laughing. It only would last maybe five minutes before one of us would cave.
• Coming up with titles for the book you never wrote. Naming the cats after events like Sir Odd Leigh Waffled (the result of making waffles that were, well, odd) and Precious Horace D, or PhD, the only doctor in the family.
• The time we were camping at Priest Lake and our beach ball got away from us in the cool morning hours and you rushed in after it in your underwear – boxer shorts! How totally embarrassing to a 13-year old daughter when you came back with the beach ball, shorts plastered to your skin, and an audience of all the campers in the area. Clapping.
• Campfire breakfasts that included bugs on the eggs, that you explained away as just a little ash from the fire, or at the very least, added protein.
• Taking me to the store after my divorce and helping me write my first check; supporting me so much, encouraging me to believe in myself, cheering me on in my role as a single mother; 
• Being the father figure for my sons and leading by example so they grew into really wonderful men;

You are the reason I am who I am today – smart, caring, independent, fair, and compassionate. Happy Father’s Day, Dad! You are the father that others should follow.
 
Dedicated to Don Rice, 5-12-26 to 12-19-93.
 
~Jeanie Rice Buchanan~

A week to remember - dad

This week we look forward to Father's Day - next Sunday. The commercials are filled with images of gleeful children scurrying towards dad with Hallmark cards in hand. Many people do not have the dad of television commercials; some people may not even know their dad or have horrible memories of neglect or abuse.

 This Father's Day business can be complicated.

 My dad died six years ago this week. I had my airline tickets in hand and he died - 2000 miles away and three days - before we would travel. We viewed his body on Father's Day and I tucked my card into his casket. Words. We loved words. A few years before he died, he said, “I don't know who you would get to give a eulogy?” And then he looked into my eyes. I replied, “I can do that, Dad.”

 As you look forward to Father's Day, recall the men who nurtured and loved you - dad or not - and take time to say your words.

 Here is the conclusion from that eulogy, my last gift to my dad.  . .

 “We do not know how to let go of Dad’s hand that has guided us forever.  But we do know this: Our dad loved well, he cared deeply for his family and friends; and he taught us what we need to know, to understand, to live the rest of our lives without him.

“We have photographs and stories, but mostly we have full hearts. He gave us many experiences, but the best thing he gave us was an exceptional love that transcends even death.

“So he leaves us with a legacy of witty humor and passion for life, a legacy of quiet confidence and compassion, a legacy of his steadfast love. We will hold fast to his legacy today and each day until the moment when we join him, when we can embrace him, and take his hand once again.

Beautiful morning at Sonora Smart Dodd House

There was quite a house full of people this morning when the Sonora Smart Dodd House received it’s official designation and was added to the National Historic Register. And it was no doubt just the way Dodd - the founder of Father’s Day - would have liked it.
“Thank you all so much for coming this morning, and for being part of helping us with this process,” said Jerry Numbers, who owns the house together with his wife, Beverly.
Mayor Mary Verner said she was delighted to be at such a beautifully restored home in a neighborhood she calls her own.
“In the last year we have learned so much about Sonora Smart Dodd, the founder of Father’s Day,” said Verner. “This year’s centennial celebration was the focus of the entire city of Spokane.”
Dr. Allyson Brooks, Washington State Historic Preservation Officer, said she loves Spokane.
“Spokane is really ahead in acknowledging its historic places in comparison to so many other towns,” Brooks said.
Just before the dignitaries each got a screw so they could mount the new plaque on the house, U.S. Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers added her voice to the congratulations: “Today we get to recognize the original owners of the house, the Dodd’s and Jerry and Beverly Numbers,” said McMorris Rodgers. “This is one of only three buildings in the state that are deemed nationally historically significant.” Reverend Happy Watkins then gave the home a short blessing and everyone went inside for cake.

Keith Comes Up Big On Father’s Day

Dunno what you fathers got for Father’s Day. But it might not compare to the gift that Keith Erickson received. For those of you keeping score at home, Keith (a former Coeur d’Alene Press reporter) and I were rival local government reporters back in the day. Now, fast forward to Sunday when Keith’s wife gave him a $5 Aerosmith-“Dream On”-themed, Idaho lottery ticket. Which turned out to be worth $500. Coincidentally, Aerosmith’s “Dream On” was playing on Keith’s head set when he turned it in at a local convenience store for the cash.

Question: Do you give lottery tickets as gifts to friends and family? Any of your recipients ever won much money on one?

Happy Father’s Day

As Father’s Day comes up in a few days, I am remembering my Dad, gone now for 17 years, which I find almost unreal, because memories of him are more like yesterday!   Dad was my hero throughout my life, however, every now and then he would show his imperfections and become merely human for a moment – like when one of us crossed his path between his easy chair and a football game on the television set.  Then he was crochety and focused on that line of site that we momentarily interrupted.  We grew accustomed to crawling on the floor to get to our destination.

But more often than not, he was all-knowing, all-being – protecting me from any danger.  He was my major influence to becoming an independent thinking woman, at the cusp of women finding their own path – in 1969.   He always said I could be anything, do anything, I wanted and succeed.

There are so many things I am grateful for and thankful for, that my Dad was responsible for:

Thank you, Dad:

• For letting me dance, my feet on yours, clear until I was 16;
• Your invention of home made toys – like the sling shots we each had made out of old tires;
• The swing you made in a tree out back for my two sons to enjoy.  I have a series of pictures, frame by frame of them going up, up, up, leaning back, side-by-side, and laughing out loud with huge glee;
• The infamous “short cuts” on our many Sunday drives, one time driving up a little tiny one-lane cliff side dirt road, for miles and miles, only to have to BACK DOWN for what seemed like eternity;
• Routinely making Sunday breakfast;
• The time it snowed so deep that you made an igloo for us that lasted for two whole months!
• The same year, you made the fantastic toboggan run behind our house that was so sleek and fast that it would propel our six-man toboggan down and around the barn, and whoosh back up to the top – we only had to walk it over to the starting point and do it all again.
• Making up the rule not to sing at the kitchen table or the window would fall on our heads. (Says something about how happy we were that you would have to make up a rule to keep us from singing at the kitchen table!)
• Making up the Quiet Game (again at the kitchen table) where the game was lost at the first peep from a child, so we would spend delicious minutes making faces and sticking out our tongues at hapless siblings until one would burst out laughing. It only would last maybe five minutes before one of us would cave.
• Coming up with titles for the book you never wrote. Naming the cats after events like Sir Odd Leigh Waffled (the result of making waffles that were, well, odd) and Precious Horace D, or PhD, the only doctor in the family.
• The time we were camping at Priest Lake and our beach ball got away from us in the cool morning hours and you rushed in after it in your underwear – boxer shorts! How totally embarrassing to a 13-year old daughter when you came back with the beach ball, shorts plastered to your skin, and an audience of all the campers in the area. Clapping.
• Campfire breakfasts that included bugs on the eggs, that you explained away as just a little ash from the fire, or at the very least, added protein.
• Taking me to the store after my divorce and helping me write my first check; supporting me so much, encouraging me to believe in myself, cheering me on in my role as a single mother;
• Being the father figure for my sons and leading by example so they grew into really wonderful men;

You are the reason I am who I am today – smart, caring, independent, fair, and compassionate.  Happy Father’s Day, Dad!  You are the father that others should follow.

Dedicated to Don Rice, retired Chronicle Editor and Reporter

~Jeanie~

New baby. New Life. Happy Father’s Day to the family man.

    One day you’re the man. You’ve got nothing more to worry about than where to go for dinner or what time the big game is on TV.  And, then, one day, everything changes.


    Now, nothing is truly your own. Not your schedule, your money, your time. Not even your heart.


    After nine months in the passenger seat, you take the wheel. One look at a reddened face, one heart-wrenching cry, one touch of ten tiny fingers and ten tiny toes changes everything. You reach out to take the swaddled bundle and in a heartbeat you hold the future in your arms.


    Late night feedings and diapers by the case will give way to preschool music programs and bicycles without training wheels. Little League games will replace major league sports. College tuition will come out of the budget before money is spent on dinner in a favorite restaurant.


    Before you can put that precious cargo in the car seat for the first ride home, you’ve already got a lot to worry about.


    You’re still the man. But now, you’re the family man.

     Happy Father’s Day.

 

Cheryl-Anne Millsap is a freelance columnist for The Spokesman-Review. Her audio essays can be heard on Spokane Public Radio and public radio stations across the country. She is the author of “Home Planet: A Life in Four Seasons” and can be reached at catmillsap@gmail.com. This piece was first published in Spokane Metro Magazine, June 2009.

Father’s Day celebration in the neighborhood

Here’s a link to Jim Kershner’s wonderful story about Sonora Smart Dodd - the woman who created Father’s Day 100 years ago. Tomorrow, Sunday, there’s a celebration at her former home on South Arthur - the home has been restored by its current owner, Jerry Numbers, and is located at 603 S. Arthur.

Father’s Day Began In Spokane In 1910

Sunday marks the 100th anniversary of Father’s Day, a holiday now celebrated in 50 countries around the world but whose origins are from right here in Spokane. Sonora Smart Dodd, the woman who founded Father’s Day, was one of six children raised by her father, Civil War veteran William Smart, who was left a widower after his wife died giving birth to their sixth child. It was her appreciation and love of her father that spawned the idea and on this centennial of the holiday her family is in town to share her story. Father’s Day started as a quiet reflection inside Central Methodist Church/Sally Showman, KXLY. More here.

Question: How important is a father in today’s family?

The Great Mancession…

Good morning, Netizens…


An alternative view of Fathers Day. Boy, I have some questions.


Wouldn’t unemployed women take exception to David Horsey’s cartoon? What does giving Father’s Day cards have to do with the perception of breadwinner roles? Would the kids do the same thing for mom on Mother’s Day if she were unemployed?


Happy Father’s Day…


Dave



Rumor Squelching Dept: Obama ain’t coming

It was such a nice rumor while it lasted: President Barack Obama, on his way back from campaigning in Seattle for Patty Murray, would stop in Spokane on Sunday to pay tribute to the founder of Father’s Day on the centennial celebration of the holiday, and highlight the importance of dads.

Alas, none of it is true. First, Obama is not campaigning with Murray this weekend in Seattle, or anywhere else, said a campaign spokeswoman who noted that she’d have been told by now if that was the case.

He’s not doing anything anywhere in the state, as far as the state Democratic Committee knows, a party spokeswoman said.

So Spokane isn’t on the way to or from anything this weekend for the prez.

Helping to fuel the rumor, apparently, is some practice that local law enforcement types are doing on staging motorcades. Whatever they’re practicing for, it ain’t a Sunday drop-in from Obama. Maybe he’s highlighting the importance of dads by spending Father’s Day with Sasha and Malia.

63% Of Dads Work 40+ Hours Weekly

CareerBuilder’s Annual Father’s Day Survey finds one-in-10 working dads said their spouse or significant other has become unemployed in the last 12 months, with half indicating that it is causing stress at home. Forty-two percent of those polled are the sole provider for their household and nearly one-in-ten (nine percent) have taken on a second job in the last 12 months to provide for their family. Leaner staffs are creating more demands at the office, making it harder for working fathers to achieve a healthy work/life balance. Sixty-three percent said they work more than 40 hours per week/Consumer Affairs (via Public News Service Twitter). More here.

Question: How many hours do you work per week?

Sunny: Thanks, Dad, For Little Things

So Dad, here’s to all the little things….the little things you have taught me and shared with me on this path called life…they are really the big things…the things that mean so much to me: Thank you for the family hikes, the family bike rides, and the family picnics at Farragut State Park…and thank you for taking time from your busy schedule to take us kids fishing at Hayden Lake (even though it was me you were usually fishing out of the lake). Thanks for teaching me how to mow the lawn, how to pick potato bugs, wash the car and clean the pasture. Thanks for teaching me that girls can do anything boys can do. Thanks for teaching me that it’s okay to dig in the dirt. Thanks for teaching me how to be tough…physically and emotionally/Sunny, Bent’s Beer Garden. More here.

Question: What did your dad teach you?

High Noon: A JibJab Father’s Day Promo

Personalize funny videos and birthday eCards at JibJab!

On Facebook, Bent (who appears to be the face on the card) posted this JibJab video and the reminder: “Don’t forget Father’s Day this weekend.” My Father’s Day will have to take a back seat to my 35th anniversary on Monday and my mother’s 85th birthday. Then, Father’s Day has never been a big deal to me. How about you?

Question: Do you do something special for Father’s Day?

Ties Have Use Beyond Father’s Day Gift

This undated photo provided by Laura Kluvo shows a necktie skirt designed by Kluvo. Neckties are not only handy as last-minute Father’s Day gifts. They also provide a multitude of materials and designs for sewing projects. (AP Photo/Laura Kluvo)

Question: Is a tie the best gift you can give dad for Father’s Day?

Father’s Day Centennial On Tap

A poster announcing the centennial celebration of Father’s Day created by Spokane tourism officials portrays Sonora Smart Dodd, founder of Father’s Day, and a drawing of her father, William Smart, is seen Thursday in Spokane, Wash. This June 20 marks the 100th anniversary of Father’s Day. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios).

Question: What role did your father play in making you the person you are today?

Students plant white oak at Grant Elementary

Grant students read 1,789 books - yes, that’s correct - over the past four weeks as part of the Read For Trees program. Every completed book gave the student one vote toward either a White Oak or a Wilson Elm, and the oak won: 1,226 votes compared to 563 for the elm.

Today, at a special Father’s Day assembly at 2 p.m., the students planted the tree near the school, in Grant Park.

Jerry Numbers, who’s been an East Central neighborhood activist for many years, owns and has restored the house here in the South Perry neighborhood where Sonora Smart Dodd - the founder of Father’s Day - lived. “It’s so nice to see all the books you have read,” Numbers told the students, before sharing that Jack Dodd, Sonora’s son, went to school at Grant almost 100 years ago. “That’s why we are planting the tree here.”

Nancy McKarrow was there representing Susie’s Forest - a tree planting project she is heading up in memory of her daughter, Susie Stephens. McKarrow donated the White Oak. She complimented the students for all the books they read and reminded them to be careful when crossing the road: “My daugther was a pedestrian and she was run over by a bus - that’s how she died. Every time I look at a tree, I think of Susie. You will have memories connected to this tree, too.”

Tree planting at Grant Elementary today

Spokane Father’s Day Centennial Celebration Committee is planting a tree today at Grant Elementary School at 2:30 p.m. Grant is located at 1300 E. Ninth Avenue and was chosen as a tree planting site because of its connection to Sonora Smart Dodd, the Spokane woman who founded Father’s Day. Her son, Jack Dodd, went to Grant from 1915 to 1922. Dodd’s house is located in the South Perry Neighborhood.

Today’s ceremony starts at 2 p.m. with a program inside the school.

Father’s Day was held for the first time in Spokane on June 19, 1910 - for more information about this year’s centennial celebration go to www.fathersdaybirthplace.com

Losing on Father’s Day…

Good afternoon, Netizens…


Rather than write effusively about the rite of my father, since that relationship in my life was dismal, heartbreaking and full of personal anguish, I’ll briefly mention that I am utterly proud of my son, who lives far away from here, but is in my heart and mind nearly every week through the miracles of modern communications. I could write pages about how my son and I were separated nearly from his birth, and how we were reunited when he found me on the Internet, and our strange reunion in the Amana Colonies in Iowa on a miserably hot day. My God, we’re clones, looking so much alike that even my wife was overwhelmed by our similarities in appearance, education and personalities.


Instead, I have decided to write about the losers of Fathers Day, those men who for perhaps similar reasons to my own, find Father’s Day to be a day tinged with sadness, emptiness and even grief. We never hear about these men, rejected by their sons and daughters for a number of reasons, or how it must feel to go through life without knowing your children.



Obama Gets Personal w/Fathers

In this Aug. 12, 2008, file photo, then Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill. walks down Kailua Beach in Kailua, Hawaii, with his daughters Malia, 10, left, and Sasha, 7, during their vacation in Hawaii.  (AP Photo/Marco Garcia, File)

Item: Obama to fathers: Be involved in your kids’ lives/AP

More Info: Growing up without a father left a painful hole in his heart, President Barack Obama told boys at the White House Friday in a remarkably personal Father’s Day weekend message. He implored fathers everywhere — and the kids when they’re a bit older — to be involved in the lives of their own children.

Question: Was your father involved in your life?