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Hayden mulls firearms change

HAYDEN - The Hayden City Council tonight will consider amending its firearms ordinance.

Prof who shot foot in class ID’d, student predicts it’ll probably happen again

The instructor who shot himself in the foot with a concealed handgun while lecturing to 20 students in a chem class at Idaho State University on Tuesday has been identified, and it wasn’t just some guest instructor – it was an assistant professor of chemistry who’s taught at ISU since 2007. The Idaho State Journal reports today that the instructor involved was Byron Bennett, assistant professor of chemistry, who holds a current Idaho Enhanced Concealed Weapons Permit, an Idaho Basic Concealed Weapons Permit and a Utah Concealed Weapons Permit.

A new law passed by Idaho’s Legislature this year over the objections of the state’s colleges and universities allows anyone with the enhanced permit to carry a concealed firearm on public campuses, except in dormitories or large arenas.

The State Journal talked to several ISU students today who were divided about the new law. “It’s probably going to happen again,” said student Randi Leissring. Freshman Taylor Hansen of Chubbuck said her parents plan to buy her a gun.  “I’m a girl and I’m little,” Hansen said. “But I’m going to take some safety courses so I don’t shoot myself in the foot.” The State Journal’s full report is online here.

Twenty students were present when ISU instructor shot self in foot with concealed gun

KTVB-TV reports today a key new detail about this week’s accidental shooting on the Idaho State University campus: 20 students were present when the instructor, who has an enhanced concealed carry permit, accidentally shot himself in the foot in a chemistry classroom on the campus. The male instructor had a loaded handgun concealed in his pants pocket, the station reports; it went off while he was teaching. KTVB’s full report is online here. Idaho lawmakers this year passed legislation allowing people with those permits to carry concealed guns on Idaho public college and university campuses – over the objections of every one of the state’s public colleges and universities, and at the urging of the National Rifle Association.

ISU instructor shoots self in foot, when concealed gun accidentally fires in classroom

An Idaho State University instructor was shot in the foot yesterday after a concealed, loaded handgun he was carrying accidentally discharged in a classroom around 4 p.m., the Idaho State Journal reports. The wounded instructor had an enhanced concealed carry permit, the type of permit required to carry a concealed weapon on an Idaho public college campus under a controversial new law passed by the Legislature this year. “It was in his pocket,” Pocatello Police Department Lt. Paul Manning told the newspaper.

After the shooting in the Physical Science Complex on the ISU campus, the chemistry instructor was treated and released from Portneuf Medical Center. ISU President Arthur Vailas called the shooting “unfortunate,” and said, “I’m sure the incident was scary and embarrassing.” He added, “When they passed this law it was bound to happen.” Other people were present when the gun discharged; discharging a firearm within city limits is a misdemeanor, but police said they are still investigating the incident. The State Journal’s full report is online here.

Student group fears costs of guns-on-campus law will fall on them, for law they opposed

As Idaho’s controversial new guns-on-campus law takes effect today – allowing people with enhanced concealed carry permits to carry concealed firearms in most areas on public college campuses in the state – a student group that organized against and strenuously protested the new law has issued a statement saying it fears students themselves will bear the costs. Here’s the statement from the Idaho Coalition to Keep Guns Off Campus:

"Our opinions on this law were not taken into account when legislators voted to allow guns in our classrooms and to remove from our institutions the local control that served students best. Our colleges and universities have complied with the law, but Idaho’s students will pay the cost. Idaho politicians have cut higher education funding by 39% in six years. Meanwhile tuition has skyrocketed. This unfunded mandate will be borne on the backs of students who protested it in the first place. The governor called on the legislature to ‘appropriately and carefully monitor, oversee and manage those difficulties and costs’ but considering legislators' track record supporting higher education, it’s hard to believe that will happen. We do hope that in the future Idaho’s politicians will take into account the will of the people who are most affected by a law.”

During this year’s legislative session, the student group delivered hundreds of letters to the governor and Legislature from students and faculty members opposed to the new law, presented petitions with nearly 3,000 signatures opposing it,m and organized a rally on the Capitol steps.

State Board of Ed updates safety policies to reflect new guns-on-campus law

Idaho’s State Board of Education, meeting in Idaho Falls yesterday, today approved an amendment to its policy on campus safety for the state’s four-year colleges and universities to comply with the new law passed this year authorizing those with enhanced concealed carry permits to carry guns on public campuses. “The updated policy makes it clear that firearms are allowed on campus only as described in section 18-3309(2), Idaho Code, or as allowed by the institution as part of an event or program approved by the institution president,” the state board said in a news release; you can see the full policy here.

State board President Emma Atchley said, “Our public universities and college are extraordinarily safe environments, and the Board is committed to ensuring that remains the case. The institutions will continue to work with security experts and local law enforcement to develop comprehensive plans to ensure the safety of students and others who use and visit our public college and university campuses.”

Each school is updating its security plan, and the college presidents will report to the board on their plans at its August meeting in Pocatello.

Big bore defense: handgun designed for your backpack?

SHOOTING — It's being touted as the perfect gun to carry in your backpack with the necessary stopping power to fend off attacks by pigs and bears.

Smith & Wesson on Monday touted its new .460-caliber revolver as an ideal firearm for your backpack in the backcountry.

Officials with the Springfield, Mass.-based company let selected members of the media fire the Performance Center Model .460 at a range in Boulder City, Nev., as part of the opening day of the annual SHOT Show.  

It has not been reported if there were any survivors.

The SHOT Show, the country’s largest gun show, is underway in Las Vegas.

According to S&W:

Revolvers have long been replaced by high-capacity semi-auto for self defense, but they still make nice companions if you like camping where the critters are big enough to eat you.

The five-shooter features a three-inch barrel, high-visibility sights and a synthetic stock with a shock absorber on the rear of the handle. Chambered for the massive .460 round, it packs a wallop.   Cost: $1,200.

By the way, research has shown that firearms are much less likely to be effective in fending off a bear attack than a large can of bear spray. Cost: $50.

Another gun writer dumped for telling it like it is

SHOOTING — Dick Metcalf, one of the country’s preeminent gun journalists for decades, has been dropped from a firearms TV show and dismissed as a columnist for Guns & Ammo magazine — and gun companies have stopped wining, dining and flying him to exotic locations to shoot.

His violation? Telling the truth.

The New York Times recently reported on the man who has been blackballed despite devoting his life to the shooting sports and monitoring gun laws.  He foolishly dared to stray the tiniest bit off the gun-lobby reservation.

In October, Metcalf wrote a column that the magazine titled “Let’s Talk Limits,” which debated gun laws.

“The fact is,” wrote Metcalf, who has taught history at Cornell and Yale, “all constitutional rights are regulated, always have been, and need to be.” 

He said that too many gun owners believed that the constitution prohibits any regulation of firearms. He noted that all rights are regulated, like freedom of speech. “You cannot falsely and deliberately shout, ‘Fire!’ in a crowded theater,” he wrote.

“The question is, when does regulation become infringement?” he continued. Mr. Metcalf ended the column arguing that requiring 16 hours of training to qualify for a concealed carry license was not an infringement.

Guns & Ammo editors had approved the column before it went to press, but they reversed course after publication when firearms-related companies threatened to pull their advertising if Metcalf wasn't canned. 

The viciousness of the gun crowd to their own kind isn't new. In 2007, Jim Zumbo, long-time hunting editor for Outdoor Life and author of 23 hunting books, wrote a blog post for Outdoor Life’s website suggesting that military-style rifles were “terrorist” weapons, best avoided by hunters. His writing, television and endorsement deals were quickly put on hiatus. The term "Zumboed" was coined and applied to anyone ostracized for saying anything counter to the party line on guns.  He had to grovel and be rehabilitated by letting Ted Nugent show him the virtues of an AR-15.

In 2012, Jerry Tsai, the editor of Recoil magazine, wrote that the Heckler & Koch MP7A1 gun, designed for law enforcement, was “unavailable to civilians and for good reason.” He was pressured to step down, and despite apologizing, has not written since, the Times reported.

 

Idaho reps can carry concealed guns, permit or no…

A legislator whose concealed weapons permit was revoked for lying about a long-ago rape case can still legally carry hidden guns – because Idaho is the only state that exempts elected officials from the permit law. The case of state Rep. Mark Patterson, R-Boise, is bringing new attention to the 1990 Idaho law providing the exemptions, and some Idaho lawmakers say it’s time for a change. “I have a philosophy that those of us in public office should be under the same laws as the general public,” said state Rep. Frank Henderson, R-Post Falls. You can read my full story here at spokesman.com.

Foley: state’s last major politician who also was a hunter

HUNTING — The pressure on sportsmen applied by the NRA and other gun rights organizations to "vote their sport" is particularly troubling since in the past 25 years it’s strayed from the big picture of fish, wildlife and habitat conservation to the narrow premise that a candidate is viable only if he has an unblemished record of opposing gun control.

This narrow approach to voting in 1994 helped unseat former Speaker of the House Tom Foley, the last major Washington candidate, I believe, to pose in a duck blind with a shotgun for statewide campaign ads.

Sportsmen are distinguished for being politically savvy, but they got snookered in that election.

RIP Tom Foley.  I hope sportsmen reflect on your service and ability to work with all parties to keep wildlife in the equation.

Lead ammunition ban awaits California governor’s signature

HUNTING — The California Senate on Monday passed legislation to protect the state’s condors, eagles and other wildlife from lead poisoning by requiring the use of nonlead ammunition for all hunting by 2019.
 
Assembly Bill 711 passed by a vote of 23-15 after being approved by the state Assembly in May.
 
If the bill is signed by the governor, California would be the first state in the country to require the use of nontoxic bullets and shot for all hunting.
 
The legislation would require the state Fish and Game Commission to issue regulations by July 1, 2015, that phase in use of nonlead ammunition for hunting of all kinds, including game mammals, game birds, nongame birds and nongame mammals. These requirements would be fully implemented statewide by July 1, 2019.
 
 
Nontarget birds and other wildlife are poisoned from scavenging carcasses containing lead-bullet fragments, eating lead-poisoned prey, or ingesting spent lead-shot pellets, mistaking them for food or grit. 

Yellowstone reports first gun-related death in 35 years

PARKS — A 3-year-old girl camping with her family in Yellowstone National Park died after shooting herself with a handgun on Saturday, the first gun-related death in park since 1978, according to the Associated Press.

The shooting, reported by the Casper Star Tribune, occurred four years after Congress approved the possession of handguns in National Parks and federal wildlife areas. The law, which was attached as an amendment to a credit card bill, allows concealed and loaded weapons in parks provided they are allowed by state law.

Related stories:

Shooters trash Forest Service signs at Hayden site

SHOOTING — The small but formidable percentage of pigs who wallow anonymously in the freedoms afforded by the Second Amendment continue to make a bad name for the sport of target shooting.

Worse, they are at an alarming rate reducing the number of places responsible gun owners can shoot. 

A site on the Coeur d'Alene National Forest near Hayden Creek that's been used by shooters for decades is on the verge of being shut down by people who trash the place with target garbage, shell casings and litter, while blasting to pieces any sign posted to plead for responsibility.

Photos with this post show signs that had been posted for less than three months at the Hayden Creek site. This is the response to Forest Service emphasis patrols at the site and efforts by volunteers to get voluntary compliance with basic littering rules and shooting etiquette.

"Needless to say, we are beyond disgusted with this type of behavior, and I imagine every responsible shooter who uses the area is, too," said Jason Kirchner, Idaho Panhandle National Forests spokesman in Coeur d'Alene. "We really don’t want to shut down shooting in the area, but behavior like this moves us closer to that decision every day.

Two Washington Department of Natural Resources parcels were declared no-shooting zones by the Spokane County Commissioners this year following a petition by fed up landowners.

Regarding the Hayden Creek site, a clearly frustrated Kirchner added:

We've had abuse in the area going back decades, but it seems to be getting worse every year. You might recall that this spring, and the previous spring, we sent out pictures and a news release begging the public to report slobs at the shooting sites. We've gotten volunteers that have started helping to clean it up, but the slobs who trash these places and shoot up everything in sight have been relentless.

I don't think it's any secret that if the trend continues there will come a time when we will have to decide that the only way to clean it up is to close it to shooting, barricade the sites, and issue citations to anybody we find shooting in the area. It's a shame that a bunch of slobs will ruin it for the responsible sportsmen who use the area.

Crapo blasts Congress, administration over gun-control proposals

Sen. Mike Crapo held a press conference at a Boise gun shop today, where he blasted Congress' and President Barack Obama's bid to tighten gun laws while promoting reauthorization of a 2004 law that, among other things, directs federal taxpayer money for mental health courts. The AP reports that Crapo is using the latest congressional recess to emphasize his reputation as a serious policy maker, not a man on his heels after his December drunken driving arrest and this month's disclosure that his campaign lost $250,000 on a loan-gone-sour.

Despite the turbulence, Crapo said he hasn't thought of retiring or considered consequences for his 2016 re-election. "No, the answer is definitely not," Crapo told the AP. "I think serving in the U.S. Senate is an incredible honor. I've been very engaged in the 'Gang of Six' and the other efforts to deal with our national debt crisis. I'm still fully engaged in that and all of the other aspects of my responsibilities in Washington, D.C." Click below for a full report from AP reporter John Miller.

NRA Newtown Response: Arm Schools

The Senate gun control debate on the near horizon, a National Rifle Association-sponsored report on Tuesday proposed a program for schools to train selected staffers as armed security officers. The former Republican congressman who headed the study suggested at least one protector with firearms for every school, saying it would speed responses to attacks. The report’s release served as the gun-rights group’s answer to improving school safety after the gruesome December slayings of 20 first-graders and six adults at a Newtown, Conn., elementary school. And it showed the organization giving little ground in its fight with President Barack Obama over curbing firearms/Associated Press. More here. (AP photo: Gun-rights activist protests legislation in Connecticut today)

Question: Do you like this idea?

Traditional muzzleader, pioneer craft show in Monroe

SHOOTING — The annual Muzzleloading Arms and Pioneer Craft Show —- sponsors say it's the largest show devoted to black-powder arms — will be held March 9-10 at the Evergreen State Fairgrounds in Monroe.

Presented by the Cascade Mountain Men, the show will be a showcase for traditional (pre-1840) muzzle loading firearms.

Gun builders will be there giving tips on their crafts among 300 traders and exhibitors.

Even non-shooters might be interested in the leather and fur goods, Native American crafts, period clothing and camping gear, beads, art and more.

Trader info: (425) 890-7208.

Gun right backers don’t have to slack on safety

SHOOTING — It's interesting if not disturbing that the discussion over guns has prompted some people among their group of circled wagons to excuse poor gun handling.

See the comments to my post regarding the photo (above) snapped at Friday's gun rights rally in Olympia.

In my experience at the Spokane Gun Club or Spokane Rifle Club, somebody would quickly step forward to correct a person for poor muzzle control. What's wrong with doing same in the media?

This woman does not know where that gun is pointing because it's behind her and out of her control. Bolt is closed. End of point.

This obervation caused some commentors to cast aspersions from their narrowly defined and propagandized vision of the media, whatever "the media" are.

But back to the point: 

Being a gun rights advocate doesn't mean you should slack off on offering reminders and enforcing points of safe gun handling with others around you, whether it's at home, in a hunting situation or at a 2nd Amendment rally. 

Should firearms safety be a requirement for gun owners?

SHOOTING — The Spokesman-Review photo above from Friday's gun rights rally in Olympia shows an appalling lack of muzzle control, with a firearm being carried in an unsafe manner.

That lady would be booted out of my elk camp, or forced to eat my cooking as punishment.

It's a reminder that under our current system, the 2nd Amendment right to bear arms is not backed up by a requirement for responsibility or safety.

I see signs here of a poorly regulated militia.

Survivalist compound proposed in North Idaho

SURVIVAL — The Citadel, a 2,000 to 3,000-acre enclosed survivalist compound proposed for the St. Maries, Idaho, area is not really an outdoors story, other than in its potential to change the complexion of hunting and fishing in the St. Joe River region.

But it's an ugly sign of the times to which everyone should be acquainted.

See today's AP story by Nicholas K. Geranios.

Tips sought on CdA gun, car thefts

Crime Stoppers is offering a reward for tips that solve a gun and car theft at a Coeur d'Alene business.

Someone entered Tate Engineering, 1103 N. 4th St., early July 30 and stolen two guns and credit cards, as well as a 2003 GMC Sierra pickup.

The truck has "Tate Engineering" written on both doors and is black with Idaho plates K462722.

Anyone with information is asked to call 1-800-222-TIPS or submit tips online. Tipsters do not have to leave their name to collect a reward but should lave a code name or number.

Group: Make Idaho Firearms Hot Spot

The association’s membership has grown from about 30 or 40 last year to more than 100 this year, according to Jon Anson, who co-founded the group while running a horse ranch and boarding business. The group’s mission is to build Idaho into a firearms- and ammunition-making hot spot. The state’s relatively lenient gun laws make it a good candidate for companies looking to leave states that have higher taxes and more gun-control laws, the group says. “Idaho in general is as gun-friendly as it gets,” said Nagy, who does dealer development and sales for Primary Weapons Systems. The group points especially to Idaho’s product-liability laws, which it says make it harder to sue gun and ammunition manufacturers than it is in other states. The state’s laws and legal precedents are “not supportive of frivolous or nuisance lawsuits,” said Sara Keyes, a board member/Audrey Dutton, Idaho Statesman. More here.

Question: Do you want to see Idaho become the firearms capitol of the U.S.?


Read more here: http://www.idahostatesman.com/2012/08/08/2223377/idaho-firearms-industry-group.html#storylink=cpy

Read more here: http://www.idahostatesman.com/2012/08/08/2223377/idaho-firearms-industry-group.html#storylink=cpy

Jury indicts Tasered fugitive for gun

A grand jury has indicted a mail thief who shot a round from a fire arm after being shocked with a stun gun by U.S. Marshals last month.

Tony L. Gust, 33, faces up to 10 years in federal prison if convicted of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

He was arrested July 20 after federal agents found him at his home in the 22000 block of West Jacobs Road, northwest of Airway Heights, and watched as he ran into his trailer and “armed himself with a firearm,” according to a news release.

He was struck with a taser, and "subsequently a round was fired from the weapon Gust was holding,” the news release said. Gust was arrested without further incident.

Gust was arrested in January 2011 after a postal inspector recognized him from surveillance video that showed him breaking into post office boxes at the Opportunity post office, 11712 E. Sprague Ave.

He was sentenced in June to three years of probation, but that was revoked in October and he was sent to jail for six months. He left in April and was to participate in a treatment program.

Authorities noted his “troubling history of violence and offenses involving firearms,” in court documents filed in May 2011, which his lawyer attributed to Gust's “physical, mental and dependency problems” and said treatment would serve well.

He remains in custody at the Spokane County Jail after pleading not guilty to the charge on Tuesday. A probation violation hearing is scheduled for Aug. 21.

Taco truck protestor gets 7 years for guns

A Whitman County man who bragged about being involved with racist taco-truck protests in Kootenai County has been sentenced to seven years in federal prison for unlawful gun possession.

Jeremiah Daniel "J.D." Hop's lawyer, Roger Peven, asked for him to receive between 15 and 21 months in prison, according to court documents, but U.S. District Judge Robert Whaley rejected that request on Wednesday.

Hop, 31, is to be on probation for three years after his release.

Hop was arrested during an FBI investigation April 20, 2011, for allegedly possessing an Izhmash 12-gauge semi-automatic shotgun on March 25.

His brother, Michael Hop, said he was set up by an FBI informant who supplied the shotgun after suggesting they go shooting.

Federal agents searched his home in Pullman on April 20 and seized that shotgun, then searched a property in Colton and seized four rifles, a shotgun and more than 150 rounds of ammunition.

Authorities say Hop had talked of targeting abortion clinics.

Hop was convicted in California of third-degree rape of a child in 2005, a felony that prohibits him from possessing firearms or ammunition. The conviction stemmed from a consensual relationship with a girl who was 14 when she first met Hop. She wrote a letter that urged Whaley to keep him out of jail.

"I strongly believe he is NOT a danger to society," the woman, now 23, wrote. "At the time I was being physically and mentally abused, he was my lifesaver."

Other friends and family wrote letters supporting Hop, including the mother of his 6-year-old son.

Exercising man loses BMW, gun, wallet

A car was recovered minutes after it was stolenin north Spokane recently when the alleged thief’s friend turned him in.

The 73-year-old owner, Robert B. Renz, parked his 2006 BMW at 8121 N. Division St. before exercising at the North Park Athletic Club on Friday.

Renz secured his wallet and keys in a locker, but someone opened the locker and stole them, then stole his BMW with a loaded Smith and Wesson .357 revolver inside, according to court documents.

Before he saw his car was missing, Renz was informed by the front desk that a man called and said he knew where the stolen BMW was.

That man told police his friend Matthew J. Gillette, 23, called him looking to sell a gray 2006 BMW. The man said he knew Gillette stole the car from the athletic club, so he called club employees and returned it to Renz.

But the gun and Renz’s wallet containing $400 still were missing. Soon, a person described in court documents as someone “who has been given special police considerations” told police Gillette was at the McDonald’s parking lot on North Division, near the athletic club.

Police arrested him there, and he told them the gun was in his room at the Howard Johnson Inn. He said he dumped the wallet, which included Renz’s military identification, in a Dumpster behind Jack in the Box and spent the cash on Oxycodone “to keep him from getting sick,” according to court documents.

Police retrieved the gun and booked Gillette into jail on charges of theft of a motor vehicle, theft of a firearm, second-degree theft, trafficking in stolen property and unlawful possession of a firearm.

Gillette has felony drug and forgery convictions that prohibit him from possessing firearms. He was jailed on $20,000 for the new charges and $20,000 warrant for theft and stolen property charges filed July 10.

Murdered man’s apartment burglarized

The family of a Western Washington man shot and killed nearly two weeks ago went to his Liberty Lake apartment to collect his things, only to find it burglarized and his newly purchased assault rifle missing.

Ryan Crews Mumm, 20, had been living in the area attending Spokane Community College, according to news reports.

He was shot and killed July 14 at Blue Stilly Park in Arlington in what police described as a dispute over $20 of marijuana. Suspect Dennis R. Watters, 41, of Tulalip, is in jail.

Mumm grew up in Arlington, and his family lives there. His sister, Jessica Olson, traveled to Liberty Lake to remove his items from the apartment at 22809 E. Country Vista Dr. and found it burglarized. An open rifle case sat on the living room floor. Olson said Mumm had bought a firearm at Cabela’s a couple months ago.

Liberty Lake police Detective Ray Bourgeois obtained a search warrant for Cabela’s firearm records that indicated the gun was a Romarm AK-47 assault rifle purchased by Mumm on Feb. 12. He entered the gun as stolen.

Mail thief fires shot after Taser shock

A convicted mail thief wanted for violating his probation shot a round from a firearm after being shocked with a stun gun today northwest of Airway Heights, according to the U.S. Marshals Service.

No one was injured and Tony L. Gust, 33, was arrested without further incident, authorities say.

Marshals were looking for Gust after a warrant was issued today in U.S. District Court. They found him at his home in the 22000 block of West Jacobs Road about 4:20 p.m. and watched as he ran into his trailer and "armed himself with a firearm," according to a news release.

"Deputies deployed a taser striking Gust. Subsequently a round was fired from the weapon Gust was holding," the news release said. "The Deputy U.S. Marshals then subdued Gust and took him into custody."

Gust was arrested in January 2011 after a postal inspector recognized him from surveillance video that showed him breaking into post office boxes at the Opportunity post office, 11712 E. Sprague Ave.

He was sentenced in June to three years of probation, but that was revoked in October and he was sent to jail for six months. He left in April and was to participate in a treatment program.

Authorities noted his "troubling history of violence and offenses involving firearms," in court documents filed in May 2011, which his lawyer attributed to Gust's "physical, mental and dependency problems" and said treatment would serve well.

Gust has previously been employed as a welder and a cook, according to court documents. In 2003, he was arrested for illegally shooting on a property in Liberty Lake, according to news archives.
  

Gun suspect arrested after shooting

Gunfire at a party in Spokane Valley early Sunday led to the arrest of a 24-year-old suspect.

Edgar Ambriz Viveros is accused of firing a pistol at a home in the 15000 block of East Mission Avenue, where sheriff's deputies responded to a report of a shooting about 4:50 a.m.

No one was shot but on person cut his hand on broken glass during the altercation, according to the Spokane County Sheriff's Office.

Witnesses said Viveros fired the gun and fled in a vehicle before deputies arrived. Deputies found a vehicle matching the description in the area of Pines and Cherry roads.

Two men were detained for questioning after the vehicle was stopped at Pines Road and Maribeau Parkway. Major crimes detectives identified Viveros as a suspect and arrested him for first-degree assault.

3 plead not guilty in downtown assault

Three men accused of a brutal beating in downtown Spokane late last month have pleaded not guilty.

Clayton M. Cotter, 21; Schuyler Ray Cotter, 19; and Michael W. Baesman, 34; are accused of beating a man unconscious June 27  near West 2nd Avenue and South Jefferson Street.

Clayton Cotter remains in jail on $10,000 bond. His younger brother is out of jail and was summonsed to court this morning for his arraignment before Superior Court Judge Annette Plese.

Baesman is at Geiger Corrections Center on $10,000 bond. He and the elder Cotter were arraigned Tuesday
Just after the brothers were arrested, prosecutors charged them with unlawful possession of a firearm for a case from December.

Police searched a home in the 1600 block of East Glass Avenue Dec. 8 after reports that the brothers lived there and had been possessing firearms. One witness said the men and their friends shots into a diaper box in the basement on a daily basis. Police seized a .22 caliber Mossberg 702 Plinkster rifle, along with rounds of .22 caliber ammunition and shotgun ammunition.

The downtown beating came at a time of concern from businesses and city leaders about roving packs of violent young people. Police have made several arrests.

On June 16, 18-year-old Eric James Smith was arrested for allegedly beating a bouncer at Jimmyz, 521 W. Sprague, who had just left work. David Reynold said he was surrounded by a large group of men who were "getting mouthy" and "getting in my face," according to court documents.

Reynolds said the men retreated when he showed them his handgun. He was treated for a head injury at a hospital. Smith pleaded not guilty June 26 to second-degree assault and remains in jail on $20,000 bond.

Police say an increased focus in the downtown area has aided in the arrests.

Burglar shoots at elderly woman’s home

A Spokane burglary suspect believed to have fired several rounds into an elderly woman's front door was arrested after a sheriff's corporal shot him with bean bags in front of another would-be victim's home early Saturday.

Ernest Earl Strebeck, 46, was armed with a handgun when members of the sheriff’s SWAT team confronted him as he sat on a porch of another home at 6536 N. Freya St.

Strebeck refused commands to lower the gun and instead stood up and stepped down from the porch, then tossed the firearm back onto the porch and walked away with his hands in his pockets. Cpl. Jeff Shover used a shotgun to fire three bean bags at Strebeck to subdue him enough to be handcuffed. He was transported to a hospital before being booked into jail.

Read the rest of my story here.

Public’s help sought in cat cruelty probe

Spokane County animal protection offers are asking for the public's help as they investigate a horrendous case of animal cruelty.

A cat had to be euthanized on Monday after SCRAPS officers found it shot in the head in a dumpster at the Viewpoint Villa Apartments, 5911 E. Woodlawn Ave., in Spokane Valley.

A woman had reported a cat screaming from the dumpster, and the apartment manager found the bleeding, injured feline inside a garbage bag wrapped in a blanket.

The cat was taken to a veterinarian and euthanized. Investigators say the cat also sustained traumatic injuries to its body.

Anyone who may have seen or heard something is asked to call (509) 477-2532 immediately. Your name and contact information will remain confidential with SCRAPS.