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WALeg Day 47: Sheena’s Law on gun notification passes Senate

OLYMPIA — Family members could be warned before police return guns to a person who had them seized by law enforcement, under a bill approved unanimously this morning by the Senate.

Known as the Sheena Henderson Act for a woman fatally shot by her husband at Deaconess Hospital last summer, the bill is designed to let family members request to be notified before a person with a history of mental health or domestic violence gets guns back that were seized by police. 

Sen. Andy Billig, D-Spokane, said Henderson's family told legislators in hearings over the bill that if she had known her husband Chris had retrieved his gun from police, she would have taken extra precautions and could be alive today. A few weeks before the shooting, Chris Henderson had his guns seized when police intervened in a suicide attempt. But after being referred to law enforcement for another possible suicide attempt and later released, he went to the Spokane police station and retrieved the gun. 

The next day he went to he floor at Deaconess where Sheena Henderson worked, killed her and then himself.

"This is a notification bill. It is not what anybody could call a gun control bill," Sen. Mike Padden, R-Spokane Valley, said.

WALeg Day 8: Guns banned in legislative galleries

OLYMPIA – Visitors to the Legislature are banned from bringing guns and knives into the House and Senate galleries or committee rooms.

The changes in House and Senate rules, which were posted outside the gallery doors Monday, come after demonstrators from a gun-rights rally last Thursday brought and brandished weapons in the House gallery. Senate leaders announced a ban for their gallery Friday, and the House followed suit Monday after legislative leaders and security officials studied the issue over the weekend.

Deputy Minority Leader Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, said the rules have been clarified to make clear that openly carried guns are among items that are banned as objects of demonstration. Last Thursday, he said, some gun-rights advocates brought loaded firearms into the gallery. One had a chambered round and ejected it onto the gallery floor.

“All the rules of gun safety were violated,” Kretz said. “It's too bad, because  I don't think they represented your average gun owners.”

There was some inconsistency in the old rules in which a gallery visitor with a gun and a backpack would have to take the backpack off and leave it outside the gallery, yet could carry the firearm in, Kretz said.

Visitors were allowed to bring firearms they were carrying openly into the building and the fourth floor gallery because of a state that allows people to openly carry the weapons. But the Legislature has rules that ban demonstrators from bringing protest signs on sticks into the building and bans “props that could be construed as an effort to promote demonstrations” in the galleries.

House Minority Leader Dan Kristiansen, R-Snohomish, called the change a clarification that became necessary “after a very,very few people stepped over the line.”

“It was obvious that they were using the open-carry law as a prop,” Kristiansen said, adding the rule change doesn't apply to concealed weapons, which would still be allowed for visitors with the appropriate permit. He said he didn't anticipate any effort to change the rule back at this point. 

Whether the rule would survive a constitutional challenge if someone felt it violated the Second Amendment is “way above my pay grade,” Kristiansen said. But more restrictive bans have been upheld for courts, he added, and there are restrictions on First Amendment free speech provisions because protest signs are banned.

The new rules were announced in the House Democratic and Republican caucus meetings before the morning session.

WALeg Day 4: Gun-control groups plan legislative scorecard

OLYMPIA — A coalition of gun-control groups plans to grade legislators on their efforts to adopt new laws and oppose changes to the background-check law approved last November by voters.

The Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility said Thursday it will score legislators not just on how they vote on bills the groups support or oppose, but on whether they are active in advocating for gun control during debates and deliberations, meeting with those who support gun control or "engaging the public" on the issue.

The coalition expects to back several bills, including one to reduce child access to firearms in homes, and oppose efforts to repeal Initiative 594, a law approved by voters to require background checks on most purchasers of guns through private sales. 

It won't penalize legislators for meeting with gun-rights advocates, said Rebecca Johnson-Arledge, an advisor to the coalition, because "we encourage people to meet with everyone." Legislators who appear at gun-rights rallies will get zeros while those who participate in gun-control events will get points.

"We want to reward good behavior," she said.

The scorecard will be released later in the 2015 session.

Sunday Spin3: More on the gun initiatives

In politics, as in military campaigns, victory has many fathers. That may explain the self-congratulatory press release from supporters of I-594. . . 

To continue reading this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog.

Sunday Spin2: Did the Ayes have too much of it?

Spokane County voters said yes to both gun initiatives, causing some observers on the West Side of the state to scratch their heads on election night. One could reasonably vote no on I-591 and I-594, they opined, but voting yes twice seemed illogical on measures largely in conflict.

Spokane is not alone in passing both measures. Asotin, Clallam, Clark, Pierce and Skagit counties also have said yes to both. In all cases, at least one initiative is ahead by relatively thin margins.

In Spokane, I-591 leads by about 1,800 votes, and I-594 about 8,000 as of Friday’s count. But the precincts where one passed are generally precincts where the other failed. There are a handful of precincts in the northeast city of Spokane’s and the central Spokane Valley where both passed. But some of those tended to be precincts with higher numbers of “undervotes” where at least one measure was left blank.

Some voters may have strong feelings in favor of one, but couldn’t decide on the other. Indecision isn’t the same as being contradictory.

To compare the undervotes with the Spokane County votes on I-591 and I-594, check the PDF documents below.


Documents:

Handing off guns at anti 594 rally won’t prompt arrests

OLYMPIA – Gun rights activists plan to bring their firearms to the Capitol next month in an effort engage in civil disobedience by violating the new background check law that they despise.

But there may be a flaw in the plan. What they say they’re going to do – “openly exchange guns” by handing them to someone else – isn’t against Initiative 594, according to Bob Calkins of the Washington State Patrol, which provides law enforcement on the Capitol grounds. They’re not going to be arrested or cited for doing that. . .

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog.

 

Mapping the vote: Tale of 2 gun initiatives

Spokane County votes on the gun initiatives are almost, but not quite, a mirror image of each other. (Click on the "continue reading" function to see both maps on the same page.)

That's not surprising, considering the two ballot measures essentially were competing with each other for support. But they are both passing in Spokane, so some people may have voted for both, and some people could easily have decided they didn't like either.

For better detail on the two maps above, click on the documents below.

To see how the state voted as a whole on the two initiatives, click here. 


Documents:

Elway Poll: Voters split on gun initiatives

OLYMPIA — Support for both gun initiatives on the November ballot is falling, but the proposal to expand background checks to most sales still has majority support, a new Elway Research poll says.

Three of five voters polled last week said they would definitely or probably vote for I-594, down from nearly three out of four voters polled in April.  Only about two of five said they would definitely or probably vote for I-591, a counter  measure that wouldn't allow Washington to change its background check laws unless a new national standard was set; it had support of 55 percent of those polled in April.

Elway Research polled 500 registered voters chosen at random across the state, by phone,  between Oct. 6 and Oct. 9. The poll has a margin of error of 4.5 percent. 

The 60 percent support for I-594 lines up with the 59 percent of people in the poll who said they believe background checks should be more extensive. 

Pollster H. Stuart Elway said the recent survey also indicates voters are more familiar with the two measures. In April, 40 percent of those surveyed said they planned to vote for both initiatives, even though they are basically in conflict. That has dropped to 22 percent.

Elway offered some caveats about polling on initiatives:

— When conflicting initiatives on the ballot confuse voters, they are apt to vote "no" on both. 

—Initiatives tend to lose support over time, although a 60 percent approval with three weeks to go has been enough for many measures in the recent past. "Under this theory, I-591 looks like a goner and the question is whether I-594 will hold on to enough of its 10-point cushion over the next three weeks to prevail," he said. The mid-term election is expected to have a low turnout, with more conservative voters casting ballots, he added.

For more details, click on the document below.

 


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Sunday Spin: Gun inits duel over cop support

OLYMPIA – Law enforcement agencies may not be getting much love in most of the country after images of heavily armed cops filled news coverage of protests in Ferguson, Missouri. But here in Washington, the dueling gun initiatives are competing for the claim of “cops love my initiative better.” . .

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog.

 

Gun initiatives: Where the money comes from

The vast majority of money supporting the initiative to expand background checks on guns comes from just 10 ZIP codes in the Seattle area, much of it from people with ties to the state's tech industry.

An analysis of contributions reported to the state Public Disclosure Commission shows more than $2.8 million in contributions for Initiative 594 – or about 84 cents of every dollar contributed – comes from downtown Seattle, areas around Lake Washington and Shoreline. So far the ballot measure to extend background checks from licensed dealers to most private sales has raised about $3.2 million, about three times more than the the campaign for a counter proposal.

Protect Our Gun Rights’ big donors are a trio of groups opposed to further gun control measures. I-591 would only allow changes to Washington’s gun control laws unless a uniform national standard is adopted. . . 

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog.


Documents:

Nazi comments continue to provide ammo to I-594 debate

A suggestion by an NRA spokesman that Jews should oppose gun control because of what happened in Nazi Germany has added new ammunition to the debate over two competing measures on the November ballot.

The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle and others on Tuesday called for the resignation of NRA state lobbyist Brian Judy, who said recently he couldn't understand why Jews would support gun control, a policy instituted by the Nazis.

Judy reportedly was telling a group of gun rights advocates he couldn’t understand the support for Initiative 594 by a major donor whose family he said was “run out of Germany by the Nazis". . . 

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, click here to continue inside the blog.

Bringing Nazis into the WA gun debate

It's almost always a bad idea to make a reference to Nazis in any contemporary American political debate because it shifts the focus away from the issue at hand and onto the rightness or wrongness of the analogy.

That's what's happening for opponents of Initiative 594, which would expand background checks for most gun sales and transfers, after a comment by a National Rifle Association spokesman.

Steve Judy, an NRA lobbyist, was recorded offering his views of why some people push for more gun control, and why he believes they should know better. As first reported on Horsesass.org, a Seattle political blog, he started with the super rich, opining that they want to know where the guns are so that the poor can be disarmed before the rise up against them. He was rifting on a column in Politico, a national political website, by Nick Hanauer, who was actually talking about what was going to happen to the super-rich (himself included) if they don't do something to correct the growing gap between the rich and poor.

Hanauer was talking about the poor coming for the rich with pitchforks, but Judy said the reason the rich support gun control is so that the poor won't have guns. But then Judy veered into the fact that Hanauer's family emigrated from Germany to escape the Nazis, and said he was dumbfounded Hanauer would give money to gun control. . .

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog.

 

Used practice targets left at League office

The League of Women Voters of Washington wants supporters of a gun-rights initiative to denounce the unknown group that left used targets at or near their office.

But supporters of Initiative 591 called the incidents a "propaganda stunt" the good government group is milking to get money for a rival ballot measure, I-594. . . 

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, click here to continue inside the blog.

Sunday Spin2: Tread lightly on tragedy during campaigns

Washington residents can expect the volume to go way up on the gun control issue with dueling initiatives on the November ballot. I-591 wouldn’t allow any changes in background checks unless they are national; I-594 would extend background checks in Washington to private sales.

The recent shooting at Seattle Pacific University predictably generated discussion on the issue. But it also raised an interesting political question: Is it OK for a campaign to piggy-back on a tragic event? And if so, how far can you go?

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog.

Gun surrender law could save lives, victim says

Stephanie Holten, center, talks with Rep. Laurie Jinkins and Grace Huang of the state Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

OLYMPIA – When her ex-husband pointed a gun at her and threatened to blow her head off while she knelt in her Spokane living room, there was a point when Stephanie Holten thought “I’m going to die.”

Still, Holten remained calm enough to slip out her cell phone and dial 911 when Corey Holten turned his head away for a few seconds, then slip the phone under a blanket hoping the line was open. When he ordered her upstairs and demanded she surrender custody of their son, she stayed clear headed enough to bargain with him to give her the ammunition and put the gun down in return.

 As the last round was ejected from the chamber, she heard “Spokane Police. Show us your hands” as officers arrived, guns drawn, and arrested him.

As calm as she was on that January night in 2012, Stephanie Holten had a brief panic attack Friday after watching Gov. Jay Inslee sign a bill that will make it less likely that someone under a no-contact order and prone to domestic violence, as Corey Holten was that night, will show up at another former spouse or partner’s house with a gun.

The shakes, she explained later after catching her breath, were partly adrenaline from seeing a goal accomplished and partly post-traumatic stress that lingers.

“I’m overjoyed,” she said. “I truly believe that it will save lives.”

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog

Domestic violence offenders could be ordered to give up guns

Padden calls for a vote on firearms bill.

OLYMPIA — A person under a restraining order for domestic violence can be ordered to surrender all firearms under a law that passed the Legislature this afternoon.

In a 49-0 vote, the Senate sent to Gov. Jay Inslee a bill that allows the subject of such a restraining order to be required give up his or her guns after a hearing if a judge rules that person is a credible threat. The bill was first proposed last year in the House and went through several changes as it moved back and forth between the chambers.

Sen. Mike Padden, R-Spokane Valley, said the bill complies with both the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the stronger protections for having firearms in the state constitution. "There are times when people should not have these firearms," he said.

With an amendment for due process procedures that include a notice, the hearing and the judge's finding, the National Rifle Association dropped its opposition to the bill, Padden said. HB 1840 passed the House 97-0 last month.

 

Gun initiatives get second hearing

OLYMPIA – A pair of initiatives on gun control had their second and likely last hearing Wednesday with supporters and opponents disagreeing sharply on when giving a gun to another person would require a background check.

Wednesday’s hearing by the Senate Law and Justice Committee didn’t have the same “star power” as Tuesday’s House hearing without former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords and former astronaut Mark Kelly to speak in favor of Initiative 594. But it did feature more questions by legislators of the two initiatives sponsors and sparked a debate over what it means to “transfer” a firearm. . . 

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog.

Giffords: ‘Be bold’, pass gun control measure

OLYMPIA – Former Congresswoman Gabby Giffords urged legislators to “be bold, be courageous” and require wider background checks on gun sales. Gun rights advocates urged them to protect constitutional rights and pass a competing initiative.

But even before testimony began in the packed hearing room Tuesday, it was clear the Legislature is likely to do neither.

Initiative 594, which would subject most Washington gun sales to the kind of background checks now required when buying from a dealer, and Initiative 591, which would expand background checks in the state only if there's a new federal standard, aren’t likely to pass the Legislature. They're headed, instead, for the fall ballot, Judiciary Committee Chairwoman Laurie Jinkins, D-Tacoma, indicated.

“This is the beginning of a dialogue we'll be having at least until November,” Jinkins said. “Let's keep it civil.”

And for the most part, it was… .

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog. 

Live coverage: Gun control initiatives hearing

OLYMPIA — Spin Control is providing live coverage of the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Initiatives 591 and 594, two measures on gun control expected to be on the November ballot.

 

 

 

Live coverage coming: House gun control initiatives hearing

OLYMPIA — The House Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing on the two gun control initiatives likely to go on the ballot later this year.

Among the speakers supporting Initiative 594, which would expand background checks for most gun purchases, will be former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and her husband, former astronaut Mark Kelly. Also on the agenda is Initiative 591, which would require a federal standard for expanding background checks before any changes could take effect in Washington. 

The hearing is expected to draw an overflow crowd, with additional seating in the House gallery, something that's usually reserved for hearings on the very big, very contentious issues. 

We'll be covering it live, via Twitter, with reports being filed here on Spin Control.

Giffords to testify at gun initiative hearing

Gabrielle Giffords waves to reporters earlier this month at an event to mark the third anniversary of her shooting in Arizona.

OLYMPIA — Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who survived a shooting rampage that killed six, will testify in favor of a proposed initiative to require broader background checks for gun purchases.

Giffords and her husband, former astronaut Mark Kelly, are expected to testify in favor of Initiative 594 at a hearing of the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday afternoon.

The committee is holding a hearing on both I-594, which would extend the current requirements for background checks on purchases from dealers to most public sales, and I-591, which would only allow broader background checks if the federal standard changes. Both proposals gathered more than 340,000 signatures in campaigns last year. I-594 has already been certified as an initiative to the Legislature and I-591 is in the middle of the having signatures verified but is expected to be certified soon.

Under state law, the Legislature could pass either into law. But it is expected to pass on both, sending the two measures to voters on the November ballot.

Giffords was severely wounded and six people were killed when a gunman opened fire on a congressional gathering in her Tucson, Ariz., congressional district three years ago. She and Kelly formed Americans for Responsible Solutions to help reduce gun violent after the Sand Hook Elementary School shooting in 2012. 

The House Judiciary Committee's hearing is at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. The Senate Law and Justice Committee also will hold a hearing on the two measures starting at 1:30 Wednesday. Both are expected to attract a wide range of supporters and opponents of the conflicting initiatives.

WA Lege: Gun initiatives getting hearing Wednesday

OLYMPIA — Two initiatives dealing with gun rights and gun control will get a hearing next Wednesday in the Senate Law and Justice Committee.

Both are initiatives to the Legislature. I-594, which would extend the current background checks for buyers required for sales from gun dealers to almost all other sales, was certified Wednesday by the Secretary of State's office after a check of signatures submitted late last year. I-591, which would ban stricter background checks in Washington until federal standards changed, is undergoing signature checks but is expected also to easily certify.

The Legislature is unlikely to pass either into law, bypassing the ballot. But Committee Chairman Mike Padden, R-Spokane Valley, said a hearing will give legislators and the public a chance to get questions answered. "That helps us and it can only help to inform the voters," he said.

The 1:30 p.m. hearing will be moved out of the committee's regular room into a larger room to accommodate the expected crowd.

 

Gun initiatives headed for Lege

OLYMPIA — The Legislature almost certainly will have two chances to enact gun legislation in the upcoming session.

It will almost just as certainly ignore both, and pass the question on to voters.

Supporters of Initiative 594 turned in an estimated 95,000 additional signatures this week for their proposal the extend background checks to most private sales of firearms. Along with the 250,000 or so signatures turned in last fall, that would give them 345,000 signatures, and they only need 246,372.

Supporters of Initiative 591, which would keep the state from expanding background checks until a "uniform national standard" is developed expect to turn in about 5,000 signatures today to go with the 340,000 they submitted in late November.

There's no prize for having the most signatures, but we can expect a certain amount of bragging rights. In both cases, it seems likely the two proposals will be certified by the Secretary of State's elections office through the expedited process that ballot measures with well over the standard rejection rate have.

The initiatives would then be forwarded to the Legislature, which has several options:

— Ignore both, which would put them on the ballot in November.

— Reject both, which would also put them on the ballot in November.

— Pass one one but not the other. The passed initiative would become law, the other would go on the November ballot.

— Pass both into law. That could be a problem because in some respects they are conflicting, but legislators could leave that to the courts to sort out.

— Pass an alternative bill on gun control, which would put three proposals on the topic on the November ballot.

Based on the options, and the Legislature's track record with initiatives that are sent its way, smart money would be on "ignore both".   

Foley: state’s last major politician who also was a hunter

HUNTING — The pressure on sportsmen applied by the NRA and other gun rights organizations to "vote their sport" is particularly troubling since in the past 25 years it’s strayed from the big picture of fish, wildlife and habitat conservation to the narrow premise that a candidate is viable only if he has an unblemished record of opposing gun control.

This narrow approach to voting in 1994 helped unseat former Speaker of the House Tom Foley, the last major Washington candidate, I believe, to pose in a duck blind with a shotgun for statewide campaign ads.

Sportsmen are distinguished for being politically savvy, but they got snookered in that election.

RIP Tom Foley.  I hope sportsmen reflect on your service and ability to work with all parties to keep wildlife in the equation.

I-594 sponsors turn in 250K signatures

Carol Holt, Robert Martin and Barbara King count petitions whild Kate Ayers shuttles stacks of I-594 to a storage box.

OLYMPIA — Sponsors of a proposal to expand background checks for gun purchases turned in 250,000 signatures Wednesday to qualify it as an initiative to the Legislature.

If they were all valid, that would be enough to have Initiative 594 considered in the 2014 session. But initiative campaigns typically have rejection rate of 10 percent to 15 percent, sponsors plan to turn in as many as 75,000 more in December.

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog.

Gun control supporters to turn in some petitions Wednesday

Sponsors of an initiative to require background checks for more gun sales will turn in some of the signatures Wednesday that they need to send the measure to the Legislature next year.

Members of the Initiative 594 campaign said Tuesday they plan to turn in about 225,000 signatures. or about 70 percent of their goal, as a way of "demonstrating tremendous support" for the proposal. It would require background checks for most private gun sales or transfers, beyond the current requirement of background checks for sales by dealers.

To be certified as an initiative to the Legislature, a proposal needs a minimum of about 250,000 signatures, although most campaigns try to get a substantial cushion of extra signatures to cover names that aren't registered or are duplicates. Most campaigns wait until they have reached their targets, or the deadline in late December, before submitting signatures.

Also gathering signatures this year is I-591, a separate initiative to the Legislature that would forbid gun confiscation without due process and require a national standard for expanded background checks. 

The Legislature can pass an initiative without changes and make it law, or it can ignore or reject it, which puts it on the ballot next November. It can also pass an alternative, which would put both the original initiative and the alternative on the November ballot.

Gun rights, gun control advocates want your signature

OLYMPIA – Whether you are for or against stricter background checks on gun sales, you'll have a chance in the coming months to support your position by signing an initiative to next year's Legislature.

 

If both Initiative 591 and Initiative 594 get the required signatures, they'll likely both be on the 2014 ballot if the Legislature follows its recent pattern of punting such proposals to voters rather than adopting them. (The full text of the initiatives can be found by clicking on the documents below.)

 

I-591, a one-page proposal that bans government confiscation of guns and any background check that isn't part of a national system, started its signature-gathering campaign about two weeks ago at one of the state’s biggest gun shows, the Washington Arms Collectors’ Show in Puyallup.

 

“We knew what the other side was going to do. We filed before they did,” said Alan Gottlieb, campaign manager for Protect Our Gun Rights.

 

I-594, an 18-page proposal that lays out a process to apply the current federal system of background checks required by dealers to private sales in Washington, with some exceptions for family transfer and antique sales, got its final ballot language approved last week and will start signups this week.

 

“It looks like we’ll be out there together,” Zach Silk, campaign manager for the Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility, which is sponsoring I-594…

 

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog.


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Illinois enacts concealed-gun law

In this file photo Ben Wetzel displays one of his handmade holsters.

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — Illinois became the last state in the nation to allow public possession of concealed guns as lawmakers rushed Tuesday to finalize a proposal ahead of a federal court’s deadline.

Both chambers of the Legislature voted to override changes Gov. Pat Quinn made to the bill they approved more than a month ago. Even some critics of the law argued it was better to approve something rather than risk the courts allowing virtually unregulated concealed weapons in Chicago, which has endured severe gun violence in recent months.

The Senate voted 41-17 in favor of the override Tuesday afternoon after the House voted 77-31, margins that met the three-fifths threshold needed to set aside the amendatory veto. Quinn had used his veto authority to suggest changes such as prohibiting guns in restaurants that serve alcohol and limiting gun-toting citizens to one firearm at a time. Read more.

What would motivate you to carry a concealed weapon?

Crapo Returns Firing re: Gun Control

Sen. Mike Crapo held a press conference at a Boise gun shop today, where he blasted Congress' and President Barack Obama's bid to tighten gun laws while promoting reauthorization of a 2004 law that, among other things, directs federal taxpayer money for mental health courts. The AP reports that Crapo is using the latest congressional recess to emphasize his reputation as a serious policy maker, not a man on his heels after his December drunken driving arrest and this month's disclosure that his campaign lost $250,000 on a loan-gone-sour/Betsy Russell, Eye on Boise. More here.

Question: Will it take Sen. Crapo long to put scandals behind him?

Minnick To Lobby For Gun Control

Former Idaho Democratic Congressman Walt Minnick has been hired by his former colleague Gabrielle Giffords’ to assist her effort to expand background checks on gun purchases. Minnick’s Washington, D.C., firm is Majority Group LLC, which he founded in 2011 after losing his first re-election bid to GOP challenger and now-Rep. Raul Labrador. Minnick and two others from Majority Group registered as lobbyists effective March 31 and filed their disclosure report April 12 as the Senate was preparing to vote on background checks, which were ultimately rejected. The filing is available on the Sunlight Foundation website. Minnick has had his differences with the NRA, getting a “D+” grade when he defeated Republican Bill Sali in 2008. Two years later, the NRA boosted his grade to a “B+,” while Labrador got an “A”/Dan Popkey, Idaho Statesman. More here. (AP file photo, of Walt Minnick)

Question: Can't trust those dern Democrats with guns, can you?


Read more here: http://blogs.idahostatesman.com/idahos-minnick-hired-by-gabby-giffords-to-lobby-for-gun-control/#storylink=cpy