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Stories tagged: History


After 131 years, Dodson’s Jewelry – Spokane’s longest-running retail business – is closing

The story of Dodson’s Jewelry spans well over a century. But after 131 years of family ownership, the story of the oldest retail store in Spokane is coming to an …


UPDATED: Sun., Nov. 11, 2018, 6:32 p.m.

WWI descendants see armistice through prism of personal pain

William Kearsey’s war was long over by the time his son ever heard about it.


Then and Now: Riverside Theater

The Casino Theater, on the 800 block of Riverside Avenue, opened in 1909.


Then and Now: Washington Street Bridge

Early bridges across the various channels of the Spokane River were made of wood, then steel and, eventually, concrete or stone. And when the Great Northern Railroad depot opened on …


Review: PBS’ ‘Native America’ is a timely series about the people who were here first

Its main points are that there were people living in the Americas for millenniums before Columbus entered without knocking from the east (around 100 million when he got here, though …


Then and Now: The National Hotel

In the early 1900s, to house the many single men and women flocking to fill many new jobs, dozens of SRO – single residence occupancy – hotels were erected downtown.


Capital punishment in Spokane: A history

If newspaper archives are any indication, race has long played a role in the most lethal sentence the justice system can impose.


Then and Now: Union Station trestle

The 1894 Spokane City Hall at Howard and Front streets symbolized the optimism and grand dreams of a railroad boomtown.


The Washington State Department of Archeology – Indiana Jones they’re not

The Washington State Department of Archeology – Indiana Jones they’re not


Getting There: A piece of forgotten history runs along North Monroe

One of the most fascinating stories in Spokane is about a wall. Specifically, the retaining wall on North Monroe, which begins just south of Glass Avenue on the west side …


Ask Dr. Universe: How did people in ancient times filter water from rain?

Every day people around the world get their water in different ways. Some get water from a well, others turn on a tap, go to the store, and some walk …


Then and Now: Desert Caravan Inn

The automobile changed the American traveling culture. Stately hotel blocks became less important than the motor inn, motel, or what the Spokesman-Review called “highway hotels.”


UPDATED: Sun., Sept. 2, 2018, 11:20 a.m.

Hairspray and high heels: Retro fashion, cars and art on display at inaugural Retro Revelry in Post Falls

Car collectors and pinup enthusiasts celebrated 1950s nostalgia with retro cars, fashion, art and rockabilly music at the inaugural Retro Revelry event in Post Falls Saturday.


50 years on, remembering Spokane’s Natatorium Park

This year marks the 50th anniversary since the Natatorium Park closed. Few alive today would remember the park in its glory days – but the ghost of a memory remains, …


UPDATED: Mon., Aug. 20, 2018, 10:46 a.m.

On 50th anniversary, Post Falls Marine veteran remembers Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia

David A. Smith was a lance corporal in the Marine Corps the night 250,000 Soviet solders landed in Czechoslovakia, and a man holding a dog showed up at his door …


Then and Now: The Spokane River

The Spokane River connects Idaho and Washington, Natives and white settlers, and a variety of landscapes and ecosystems.


Getting There: Smoke plagues our air today. A quarter-century ago, it was dust.

While our vehicles collectively remain the largest source of air pollution and greenhouse gases in Washington state, 25 years ago the problem wasn’t the tinder in our forests or the …


Then and Now: Baxter General Hospital

As World War II began in earnest, the wounded returning from war overwhelmed the military hospital system and new hospitals were planned. In 1942, city of Spokane donated 160 acres …


Then and Now: Havermale Island

Havermale Island, in the middle of the Spokane River, makes up much of the area of today’s Riverfront Park. For early settlers, it was an important site and refuge.


Then and Now: The First Transcontinental Railroad

The first white settlers came to Spokane on horseback in the 1870s but it was the railroad that filled the city with entrepreneurs, miners, loggers, farmers, tradesmen and other new …


WWII documents reveal importance of air raid wardens

Carson had been deputized as what was known as an air raid warden in the Westpark neighborhood (now Bay Vista) during World War II. He was a part of a …


Paul Turner: A special quiet at the Little Bighorn battlefield

The Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument makes you wonder.


Restoration of historic Otis Hotel underway again after delay

Restoration work on the Otis Hotel has started again, following a three-month construction delay while state inspectors investigated complaints that cancer-causing asbestos had not been appropriately handled and removed from …


Then and Now: Spokane in 1910

1910 was a watershed year for Spokane.


UPDATED: Thu., June 14, 2018, 9:53 p.m.

On her 108th birthday, centenarian Hazel Young celebrates with family in Spokane

At her 108th birthday party, Hazel Young reunited with her younger brother for the first time in eight years.


Major projects, development planned for Felts Field

Felts Field is preparing for growth with several projects in the works that include relocating a fuel facility, adding a gateway feature to the airport’s entrance and constructing a new …


Then and Now: Union Station

Bob Strahorn planned the downtown Spokane Union Station, opened in 1914, to compete with the Great Northern depot, built in 1902.


100 years ago in Spokane: Police captain investigates death of nephew in car crash

Spokane police captain George C. Miles was in police headquarters when a car brought in a deceased victim of an East Sprague car accident. Capt. Miles helped search through the …


Then and Now: Volunteers of America

Around 1899, a VOA chapter started in Spokane, organizing their charitable activities where they could find space. The group offered religious services along with food and shelter.


In scattered memorials, Spokane remembers its nation’s wars – but what do the monuments mean?

Memorial Day is a time to remember the people who died while serving in the military. Monuments are just one way to remember the dead, yet what those memorials represent, …