Everything tagged

Latest from The Spokesman-Review

Forest Service has summer job openings

NATIONAL FORESTS — National forests across the country, including the Colville National Forest, are still filling summer job positions.

The currently available jobs in northeastern Washington are temporary summer positions that start in the late spring or early summer and typically last until the fall, said Colville Forest spokesman Franklin Pemberton. The positions available are in Republic, Kettle Falls, Colville and Newport.

The jobs are in natural resources, including visitor information assistant, archeological assistant, forestry technician, hydrologic technician, biological science technician and range assistant. 

More info:

Good news on the jobs front in Idaho and Washington

There was good news in employment in both Washington and Idaho this week.

Idaho finished 2014 with an unemployment rate of 3.7 percent in December, which represents a seven-year low, according to preliminary state forecasts.

In Washington, the jobless rate rose slightly in December to 6.3 percent, but the big news from the state Employment Security Department is that employment growth last year was the highest in 17 years. The department estimates employment increased by nearly 83,000 jobs, the highest since 1997.

 

Washington Conservation Corps looks to fill 288 positions at Department of Ecology

​The Washington Conservation Corps, a part of the Washington Department of Ecology, has opened 288 jobs that help protect and restore the environment. Working in partnership with AmeriCorps, the WCC provides annual member positions for 18 – 25 years old and no age restrictions for Gulf War Era II veterans, reservists and dependents.

Those selected to become a WCC/AmeriCorps member will gain valuable, hands-on experience working with the environment. Project work includes restoration planting, invasive species removal, trail building, and more. The most recent project supported by members is the Carlton Complex wildfire, the largest and most devastating wildfire in Washington’s history.

Washington Trails Association hiring for Eastern Washington Coordinator







  

Good news for you job hunters out there: The Washington Trails Association is hiring its first ever staff position in Spokane. According to WTA, "the coordinator will create regional content for WTA publications, develop partnerships, lead outreach and engagement efforts within communities and on the trails and oversee a high quality trail maintenance program in the region."

Go HERE for the full description. Applications are due by March 24th.

Local job openings: land trust, trails association looking to hire

OUTDOORS — Two outdoors/conservation groups — Inland Northwest Land Trust and Washington Trails Association — are advertising this week for job openings in the Spokane area.

Inland NW Land Trust: Executive Director Chris DeForest will transition into the role of Conservation Director by June. During the interim, our Board will conduct a search for his successor and Chris will occupy both positions until the right candidate is hired. Chris was hired in 1997 as the Land Trust’s first full-time staff member and he has been our sole Executive Director.

Staff transition will not affect the conservation work of the Land Trust or its responsibilities to monitor the 47 easements entrusted to it. The Board and staff are poised for a future as successful as its rich history with a transition team ready to invite the next Executive Director’s vision.
More information will be available by the end of March. Questions:  Chris at cdeforest@inlandnwlandtrust.org or  (509) 328-2939.

Washington Trails Association is hiring its first staff position in Spokane.  WTA’s Eastern Washington Regional Coordinator is a temporary, part-time position focused on growing WTA’s presence in the Spokane area. The coordinator will create regional content for WTA publications, develop partnerships, lead outreach and engagement efforts within communities and on the trails and oversee a high quality trail maintenance program in the region.

See the full job description here.
  

This cup is not something you want to find on your workplace desk

This photo tells a cautionary story.  If you see one of these on your desk, be very concerned about your career choices.

If your boss leaves one of these on your desk, maybe it's time to move your resume around. I would also hide the cup in a dark cupboard.

Another clue that you're not going to be getting the corner office: Your supervisor says, "We're going to need you to come in this weekend, to work on those TPS reports"

 

Washington lost 9,500 jobs in last 2 months

OLYMPIA — Washington lost 8,100 jobs last month and 1,400 in September when  employment statistics are adjusted for seasonal variations.

The changes left the state's unemployment rate almost unchanged. It was 7 percent in August, 6.9 percent in September and 7 percent in October. The state Employment Security Department said the losses come after almost two years of slow job growth.

The state didn't report employment statistics last month for September. The reason? The federal government's partial shutdown meant people who help compile some of the figures were on furlough. Paul Turek, a labor economist for the department, said the state did gain some jobs in September and October, but not as many as it normally would so the totals come off as a loss when seasonal adjustments are made. More from the department's statement 

The drops are likely related to recent statistical adjustments and some softening of the economy, he said.

“We enjoyed a very long growth streak, but we should expect there will be ups and downs over time as the recovery gradually strengthens,” Turek said.

Both the job numbers and the unemployment rate may be revised as more information comes in.

Industries with job gains in October wholesale trade, up 1,000; retail trade, up 400; other services, up 300; government, up 200 jobs, mostly in K-12 education and state higher education; and the transportation, warehousing and utilities industry, up 100.

Industries that reported job losses included education and health services, down 2,800 jobs; construction, down 2,800; leisure and hospitality, down 2,700; manufacturing, down 1,300 jobs; professional and business services, down 300; financial activities, down 100; and information, down 100.

 

Project Hope announces Executive Director position

Are you looking for a sweet gig? Project Hope, one of our best examples of urban farming, is hiring an executive director.  The non-profit creates opportunities for youth enrichment in Spokane’s West Central and Emerson Garfield neighborhoods through community engagement, job training, and education.

Here are the details:

Description: Provide oversight and financial management, lead development, fundraising, and communications.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in related field or five years of experience in leadership and program development in a non-profit,
educational institution, or equivalent.

Edit: LCDC Should Target Good Jobs

If you take the candidates at their word, there's no chance Coeur d'Alene's urban renewal agency is headed for the guillotine. That doesn't mean a close shave isn't in store. As they march down the campaign trail, including a televised forum last week, all but one of the candidates for Coeur d'Alene council and mayor say Lake City Development Corp. needs to sharpen its focus on economic development, with creation of good jobs at the head of the to-do list. While economic development has always been part of LCDC's mission, it hasn't taken center stage. In all likelihood, it will now/Coeur d'Alene Press Editorial Board. More here.

Question: I don't quite understand what people mean when they say "good jobs." Can you attract good jobs to a tourism center like Coeur d'Alene. The timber jobs are gone. You're not going to create a bunch of manufacturing jobs in town. So what types of "good jobs" do you think Coeur d'Alene/Kootenai County can attract?

Sightline’s “Jobs Per $1 Million Investment”

As part of their ongoing coverage of Northwest coal exports, Sightline broke down where investments matter in terms of job production. Coal doesn't fair to well.

Here are some more thoughts on the matter of jobs: Peabody Energy, SSA Marine and Goldman Sachs want to build the Gateway Pacific Terminal at the price of $665 million. According to official project documents, the terminal would support 257 direct jobs, including office workers, at full build-out. That’s one new job for every $2.6 million invested and that's assuming the terminal can actually be built for its advertised price.

New EPA director debunks environmental regulations as “job killing”


In her first speech as the new adminstrator of the EPA, Gina McCarthy addressed a crowd at Harvard Law School.

From the AP:
“Can we stop talking about environmental regulations killing jobs? Please, at least for today,” said McCarthy, referring to one of the favorite talking points of Republicans and industry groups.

“Let’s talk about this as an opportunity of a lifetime, because there are too many lifetimes at stake,” she said of efforts to address global warming.

As you know, the jobs vs. environment claim is a popular talking point. Especially, as the Obama climate plan is getting rolled out, Congress describes it as a job-killer. Here's the good stuff from her speech:

The truth is cutting carbon pollution will spark business innovation, resulting in cleaner forms of American-made energy…
  

Sims Miffed Henderson Bill Now Law

Generating more jobs in Idaho might get a little easier now that the Legislature passed House Bill 100, and the governor signed it into law last week. "It is designed to create jobs, and we do need more jobs in Idaho," said Rep. Frank Henderson, R-Post Falls, who sponsored the legislation. "This helps us be a little more competitive with our neighboring states when we are recruiting jobs." But not everyone agrees that the state should be spending $3 million, which was appropriated to the fund, on job creation. Rep. Kathy Sims, R-Coeur d'Alene, voted against the bill along with Rep. Ron Mendive, R-Post Falls, and Sen. Bob Nonini, R-Post Falls. She said she has little faith in government creating good jobs. "We don't have an extra $3 million in this budget," Sims said. "This makes absolutely no sense whatsoever"/Jeff Selle, Coeur d'Alene Press. More here.

DFO: Notice the byline on that Coeur d'Alene Press story?

Question: Do you think government has a role to play in job creation?

Micron announces 30 layoffs in LED program

Here’s a news item from the AP and the Idaho Statesman: BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Micron Technology Inc. is scaling back on its plans to develop energy-efficient lighting technology it launched in 2009, leading to the layoff of at least 30 workers. Micron spokesman Dan Francisco confirmed the decision Wednesday in a story published by the Idaho Statesman (http://bit.ly/Z19bCH). The Boise-based computer chip maker started the LED light technology program in 2009 with the help of $5 million in federal economic stimulus cash. The division had 170 employees, and after the job layoffs 30 workers will remain with the program while another 110 have already taken other jobs with Micron. Francisco says increased competition in the LED market, a changing world economy and decision to focus on computer memory led Micron executives to narrow the focus on the development of LED technology. Click below for a full report.

Idaho jobless rate falls to 7.1%

The unemployment rate in Idaho fell to 7.1 percent in September, the lowest rate since May 2009 and down from 7.4 percent in August.

But the state also has seen its labor force shrink four straight months, including the first August-September decline since the 1986 recession, the Idaho Department of Labor said Friday.

Employers in Idaho expanded payrolls last month at a higher rate than in the past five years, and at a slightly faster pace than during the expansion of 2003-07, the state reported.

Another 1,200 workers were on the job in September, pushing total employment to 720,600 – its highest level in four years – and breaking a two-month employment slide.

The jobless rate last month fell to 9 percent in Kootenai County; it was 11.5 percent a year ago. The rate hit 8.1 percent in Coeur d’Alene last month, down from 10.7 percent in September 2011.

Elsewhere in North Idaho, the September rate was 12.4 percent in Benewah County, 10.3 percent in Bonner County, 10.2 percent in Boundary County, and 12.1 percent in Shoshone County.

Jobless rate still falling in Idaho, but labor force shrinking

The unemployment rate fell in August across North Idaho and statewide, due in part to fewer people seeking jobs.

The Idaho rate fell to 7.4 percent, down slightly from July. In Kootenai County, the August jobless rate was 9 percent, down from 9.3 percent the month before.

The rate was lower in Bonner, Boundary, Benewah and Shoshone counties as well.

The loss of 2,600 workers from the state’s labor force – the first July-to-August decline since 1980 – offset an increase in hiring by employers at a rate just above their recession-era average, said Bob Fick, spokesman for the Idaho Department of Labor.

The August jobless rate statewide was the lowest in more than three years, but it also was the third straight month Idaho’s labor force has contracted, Fick explained.

The loss of more than 5,500 from the workforce through the summer was the largest three-month exodus of workers on record in the state and has left the labor force at its lowest level since January.

Still, there were 17,000 more people working in Idaho in August than a year earlier, and 11,000 fewer unemployed. In the past 13 months, the jobless rate has dropped a point and a half from a recession high of 8.9 percent.

Employers may be picking up their hiring, Fick said. Businesses report hiring 18,400 workers in August, mostly to replace workers who retired, were fired, found other jobs or left for some other reason. That rate of hiring matches the average August new hires during the economic expansion from 2003 through 2007, he said.

Washington Conservation Corps looking to fill 300 positions

Looking for some exciting work and money for school? The Department of Ecology’s Washington Conservation Corps (WCC) needs applicants to fill nearly 300 AmeriCorps service positions in 16 counties across the state.

The WCC was created in 1983 and has provided opportunities and training for more than 1,700 young adults. In 1994, WCC started received federal AmeriCorps funding, allowing crews to carry out on-the-ground projects across the state. Local communities rely on WCC to complete environmental projects by forming cost-share agreements with Ecology.

Typical WCC activities include planting trees and vegetation, repairing stream and streamside habitat, constructing and upgrading trails, building fencing and providing environmental education. The WCC also includes the Puget SoundCorps, formed in 2011, to complete projects on public lands designed to help carry out the Puget Sound Partnership’s Action Agenda – the single playbook for focusing efforts to recover and protect the Sound. Last year, WCC members planted 940,000 trees and shrubs, improved or restored 1,100 acres of new fish and wildlife habitat and constructed or improved 400 miles of recreational trails.

Commerce chief reports encouraging news on jobs front

Idaho Department of Commerce Director Jeff Sayer is crowing about company expansions and recruitments that are running far ahead of expectations, just a month into the state's new fiscal year. "We have probably 10 projects, all in different regions of the state, that will bring anywhere from 50 to 200 jobs per project," Sayer told Eye on Boise today. "The best part is that they're a combination of companies that are expanding and new companies coming into the state. So if that pace keeps up, this year should be a really exciting year for us."

Details are scarce at this point, but Sayer is promising more later; the jobs in question will be added within the next four to 18 months. "We're finally seeing the culmination of several months of momentum that's been building across the state, and now it's finally coming to the surface where what we were hearing is actually turning into actual jobs," Sayer said. "We're seeing growth in sectors that people aren't even aware exist in Idaho, like the aerospace sector near Spokane. We're seeing a lot of manufacturing. We're seeing a lot of strength in some of our existing industries that are finally starting to expand and grow."

The current upswell is unexpected, Sayer noted. "This is probably six to nine months ahead of what I would have predicted. So it's fun. And we're seeing even more conversations that are starting to fill our pipelines, so it's not like once we get done with these we're done - there are several more coming."

Boeing reportedly planning composite wing plant

Boeing workers in Washington hope the company will decide to build carbon-fiber composite wings for a bigger 777 in the state.

Mark Blondin of the International Association of Machinists union says a new wing plant would be a giant win for the state.  

The Seattle Times reports a manufacturing plan for the 777X is expected to go to the Boeing board by the end of the year. The plane would likely be assembled at the Everett plant where current 777s are put together. A new wing plant would add hundreds of jobs.  

The only sizable composite pieces built in Washington now are the 787 tail fin and the 777 tail, which are made at Boeing’s Frederickson plant near Tacoma.

Libraries offer summer jobs for low-income, tech-savvy teens…

More than 40 summer jobs for low-income, tech-savvy teens around the state are open at their local libraries, which are looking for teens for new grant-funded summer positions as "digital literary coaches" - teachers of basic computer skills to library patrons; the participating libraries each have one or two positions. “The unemployment rate for Idaho teenagers last year was over 20 percent,” library commission spokeswoman Teresa Lipus said. “These jobs offer a helping hand to young people, especially those from low-income homes, while at the same time help Idahoans from all walks of life navigate the computer world.”

The jobs, which pay minimum wage, are for those age 16-21; more than 70 percent of Idaho's libraries are the only free source of Internet access in their communities. Click below for more info in the full announcement from the Commission for Libraries and the Idaho Department of Labor.

Washington jobless rate dips to 8.2 percent last month

Washington gained an estimated 4,200 jobs in February, adding to the state’s gradual climb up the employment ladder, the state’s Employment Security Department said today.

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dipped to an estimated 8.2 percent in February, down from a revised rate of 8.4 percent in January.  It was the lowest unemployment rate since January 2009, when it was 7.7 percent.

As a result of the improved unemployment rate, the maximum weeks of unemployment benefits in Washington will likely be reduced from 99 down to 73 in mid- to late April.  Both of the federal benefits-extension programs are triggered by states’ unemployment rates.  Employment Security will announce the timing and more details of the change after receiving official notice from the federal Department of Labor.

On The Money: Sources for seasonal work

Temporary or seasonal work can provide a bridge for individuals looking for employment while between jobs, recent college graduations, or people interested in a new challenge.

Seasonal jobs offer opportunities in a wide variety of fields. If you’d like to explore seasonal work possibilities, check out some of these websites, compiled by McClatchy-Tribune News Service:

AfterCollege.com: Caters to college students and recent graduates looking for seasonal work opportunities.

CoolWorks.com: Search for seasonal job in 25 categories under "Find a Job" tab.

SeasonalEmployment.com: Explore different seasonal and temporary job categories by country or state.

SeasonalJobs365: Check out jobs by activity and country.

SeasonWorkers.com: Check out employment opportunities under category tabs or by company or location.

Teens needed to help fight litter on state highways

Here's an exciting summer opportunity that makes an impact: The Department of Ecology's Eastern Regional Office in Spokane plans to hire about 118 teens throughout Eastern Washington this summer to help clean up area roadsides, parks and recreation areas. Ecology Youth Corps (EYC) members also will learn how to better care for the environment.

Youths, ages 14 to 17, who live in Eastern Washington counties, can apply through April 2, 2012, to work with one of Ecology's EYC crews cleaning up litter this summer. Crews will work Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., in one of two four-week sessions. Crew locations include Chewelah, Clarkston, Colville, Inchelium, Ephrata, Moses Lake, Othello, Pasco, Pullman, Republic, Ritzville, Spokane, Walla Walla and Wilbur.

Employee compensation up 2.3% in Spokane County, 3% in Kootenai County

The average total compensation per job in Spokane County rose 2.3 percent in 2010, the U.S. Department of Commerce said today.

Total compensation – wages and salaries plus employer contributions for pension and insurance funds – averaged $50,336 in 2010, up from $49,227 in 2009, according to the agency’s Bureau of Economic Analysis.

In Kootenai County, total compensation rose to $41,947, from $40,710 in 2009 – an increase of 3 percent.

In the Seattle area, average compensation in King County rose 3.3 percent to $75,114. In the Boise area, Ada County's average compensation rose 3.1 percent to $52,105.

Compensation increased in 2,480 counties and declined in 633 counties in the U.S. last year, as the average annual compensation per job increased 2.7 percent to $58,451.

Washington jobless rate at 8.7%, lowest since 2009

OLYMPIA — Private-sector job growth has pushed Washington’s unemployment rate to the lowest point since February 2009, officials said today.

The Employment Security Department said the drop to 8.7 percent unemployment in November came with the state adding 12,100 jobs. The jobless rate was down from 9.1 percent in October.  

“This is the kind of job growth we need to make a good dent in the unemployment rate,” said Greg Weeks, director of the Employment Security Department’s labor-market information office, in a statement.  

The state has added jobs in 13 of the past 14 months, but it has usually come in smaller chunks.   

The November numbers show growth across much of the private sector. The professional and business services sector added 4,200 jobs. Leisure and hospitality grew by 3,800. Construction was up 2,000 jobs.  
Government posted a slight decline in jobs.  

More than 300,000 people in Washington were unemployed and looking for work in October, according to the Employment Security Department. As of Saturday, some 68,000 workers had exhausted their unemployment benefits.  

Washington’s numbers followed the national trend for November. The U.S. unemployment rate dropped from 9 percent to 8.6 percent.

Spokane County jobless rate 8.3% in October

Seasonal hiring of educators and retail workers helped push Spokane County’s unemployment rate down last month. It fell to 8.3 percent in October, down from September’s revised rate of 8.4 percent.

It’s the lowest rate so far this year but remains high than in October 2010, when unemployment was 8.1 percent. There were about 5,000 more jobs here one year ago, said Doug Tweedy, regional economist for the state Employment Security Department.

October typically has the highest employment rate of the year as schools bring on teachers and staff, and as stores get ready for the holiday shopping season. The local economy supports about 25,000 retail jobs, which is up 280 jobs over last October.

But the public sector continues to be a drag on the economy due to federal, state and local government layoffs – a trend that will persist into 2012, Tweedy said.

“We’re still making up for lost jobs over the year,” he said.

Private employers, however, have added about 800 jobs this year in Spokane County. The bulk of those have been in the manufacturing and health care sectors.

Another positive sign is that initial claims for unemployment benefits are down to 2007 levels, which tweedy said can be a leading indicator of job growth.

Statewide, unemployment in October was at 8.3 percent, down from 8.8 percent in October 2010.

Walmart to hire 170 for new Moscow store

Walmart plans to hire about 170 people to work at a new store opening this fall in Moscow. The retailer has opened a temporary hiring center at 672 W. Pullman Road in Moscow.

The hiring center will take applications 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Applicants also can apply online at http://walmartstores.com/Careers.

Walmart will hire full- and part-time associates in all areas of the new store, including supervisory positions, store manager Helena Probasco said.

Most new hires will begin in December to help prepare for the store's opening in January.

Washington jobless rate falls to 9 percent

OLYMPIA — Washington’s jobless rate has dropped to 9 percent — the lowest since March 2009, according to figures released today by the state Employment Security Department.

The October rate compares with a revised figure of 9.2 percent for September and 9.4 percent in October of last year in the state, the Associated Press reported. The national jobless rate also is 9 percent.   

With 4,600 jobs added in October in Washington, the department says the state has added jobs in 12 of the last 13 months.  

A loss of 18,000 jobs reported in September was revised to a loss of 10,700 jobs.  

“The October numbers showing slow, steady improvement are more consistent with what we’ve seen for more than a year,” said Dave Wallace, a department economist.  “It looks more likely that the September numbers were an anomaly.”  

Jobs were added in October in government, wholesale trade, education and health services and manufacturing. Jobs were lost in professional and business services, transportation, warehousing and utilities, and retail trade.

Wanted: Fit, educated and duty-bound

Do you have a strong sense of duty, honor and service?

Are you physically fit and educated? Looking for a career?

It's not the Army or Marines asking this time. It's the Washington State Patrol, which is recruiting for trooper positions.

Candidates are invited to fill out an application and join the WSP at its next physical fitness and written test, Nov. 5, 7:30 a.m., at the Washington State Patrol Academy, 631 W Dayton Airport Rd, Shelton, Wash.

To obtain an application for a testing date, or for more information about the process, go here.

Or contact Trooper Tina Wallman, Eastern Washington recruiter, at tina.wallman@wsp.wa.gov.

Boeing employment in Washington passes 80,000

SEATTLE — Boeing employment in Washington has exceeded 80,000 workers for the first time in nearly a dozen years, The Associated Press reports.

The company reports it had 80,666 workers in the state at the end of September. That’s the most since December 1999 when it had 80,900.

The News Tribune reports Boeing has added more than 7,000 employees to its Washington workforce since last December as it upped production of the 737 in Renton and pushed the 787 and 747-8 to delivery at the widebody factory in Everett.

Boeing’s all-time high employment in Washington was 104,000 in June 1998.

Career consultant Packard Brown to talk about job-hunting tactics tonight

Whitworth University alumnus Packard Scott Brown will talk about job-search tactics during a presentation this evening at Weyerhaeuser Hall on the Whitworth campus.

His presentation, "Strategy and Faith: Partners for Your Job Interview," starts at 6 p.m. in Room 111.
 
The event is open to the public, costs $5,  and is part of the school's homecoming weekend. And … dessert and coffee will be provided.
 
To register, visit www.whitworth.edu/homecoming.  The SR will have a summary of some of Brown's suggestions in Saturday's print edition, on the Business page.
 
Brown is a veteran career consultant and executive coach whose clients have included Kellogg's, Hewlett Packard, Lockheed-Martin, and the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. 
 
His public LinkedIn profile is right here.