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Latest from The Spokesman-Review

Cindy: Baseball? Bah, Humbug

Nebraska's Chad Christensen (2), home plate umpire Pat Spieler and Nebraska third base coach Will Bolt (6) signal a safe call for Richard Stock (39) sliding past Illinois catcher Kelly Norris-Jones in the third inning of an NCAA college baseball game Saturday in Lincoln, Neb. (AP Photo/The Journal-Star, Ted Kirk)

On her Facebook wall, Cindy writes: "The only thing worse than watching Major League Baseball is a root canal. Unless they offer nitrous oxide. Then I'll take the root canal." Dunno about you, but I (heart) Major League Baseball. I've followed it and the San Francisco Giants since I was 8 in 1958. Even pay $20 to MLB.com, so I can listen to any ballgame I want while puttering in my home office. How about you?

Question: Are you a true blue fan like DFO or are you an unbeliever like Super Sub Cindy?

MLBaseball Embraces EyeBlack

EyeBlack owner Peter Beveridge is seen posing outside of a football helmet while wearing EyeBlack patches in Rockville, Md. After starting the company in his mother's basement, EyeBlack now has a license with Major League Baseball, has secured the services of a range of NFL players and has patches available with logos from more than 400 collegiate programs around the country. The company sold more than six million patches last year. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Question: Have you ever worn EyeBlack?

Jackson Wants All-Stars To Speak Out

Raul Cordero, left, and Jorge Mandez protest Arizona's immigration law SB1070 outside of Chase Field before the Home Run Derby for the MLB All-Star baseball game Monday in Phoenix. The Rev. Jesse Jackson is urging baseball's All-Stars to speak out against the Arizona immigration law. Story here. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Question: Should Major League Baseball all-stars, especially Hispanic ones, heed Rev. Jesse Jackson's call to speak out against the Arizona immigration law?

Bonds Guilty On 1 Of 4 Charges

Former baseball player Barry Bonds arrives at federal court as a jury deliberates perjury charges against him on Wednesday in San Francisco. Bonds was found guilty of one count of obstructing justice but the jury couldn't reach a verdict on the question of whether Bonds had lied about never knowingly using steroids during his career. New York Times story here. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Question: Now that Barry Bonds has been found guilty of obstructing justice (but not three counts of lying about knowingly using steroids), should he be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Jury Deliberates Barry Bonds Case

Barry Bonds supporter Allen Jones waits outside of a federal courthouse for the verdict in the Bonds' perjury trial, Friday, in San Francisco. A jury is now deliberating the perjury case involving Bonds' suspected use of banned substances to enhance his baseball performance during his playing days. Story here. (AP Photo/ Paul Sakuma)

Question (if you're following the Barry Bonds' perjury case): Do you think Major League Baseball home run king Barry Bonds is guilty? Do you want to see him go to jail if he is?

Deliberations begin in Barry Bonds trial

RONALD BLUM, AP Sports Writer

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The eight women and four men sat in the jury box for more than 4½ hours, listening to angry arguments from federal prosecutors and Barry Bonds' attorneys at the end of a 12-day trial that exposed the dark world of baseball's Steroids Era.  Now, Bonds' fate is up to them.

After listening to tawdry accusations of drug use, theft and body parts that grew (Bonds' head) and shrank (his testicles), the 12-member panel gets to decide whether the home run king will become a convicted felon.

Bonds' trial on charges he lied to a grand jury more than seven years ago when he denied knowingly using performance-enhancing drugs ended Thursday with closing arguments from both sides that were filled with virulence and self-righteousness.

"There's a real irony to this case," Assistant U.S. Attorney Matthew Parrella concluded. "These substances that the defendant took to make himself strong — he wasn't strong. He was weak. He was too weak to tell the truth despite all the anabolic steroids."

And with that, at 3:51 p.m., U.S. District Judge Susan Illston turned to the jury box and said: "At this point ladies and gentlemen, we're turning it over to you."

The jury's first order of business when it starts deliberations today — the day the World Series flag is raised at nearby AT&T Park, home of Bonds' San Francisco Giants — is to elect a foreman. Then it must sort through the testimony of 25 witnesses and hundreds of exhibits that include syringes, vials and dizzying computer graphs of drug tests.

A seven-time MVP regarded as among the greatest hitters ever, Bonds is charged with three counts of making false statements and one count of obstruction of justice. His lawyers ridiculed the prosecution as being celebrity obsessed and willing to cut deals with anyone who would implicate perhaps the top player of his generation.

"It's part of an effort to demonize Barry Bonds, and it's very wrong," lead defense lawyer Allen Ruby said.

 Cristina Arguedas, another of Bonds' attorneys, repeatedly took off her glasses and pointed them contemptuously at Jeff Novitzky (right), the tall, bald federal investigator who was seated at the prosecution table.

"They have the power to end careers and to ruin lives," she said to the jury, her voice quavering. "And nobody gets to test that evidence unless they have the wherewithal and internal strength to come to a jury trial — to you."

Read the rest of the AP story by clicking the link below.

Thief hits Phillies pitcher’s Wash. home

MOUNT VERNON, Wash. (AP) — Police are searching for thieves who burglarized the Mount Vernon, Wash., home of Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Kyle Kendrick and took his World Series ring.

Lt. Chris Cammock said Monday that the thieves also took other valuable items. He says Kendrick and his family were not home at the time of the burglary, which occurred in late March.

The 26-year-old (pictured in March) graduated from Mount Vernon High School and turned down an opportunity to play quarterback at Washington State to sign with Phillies.

Cammock says he wants to alert the public in case Kendrick's items are resold on the secondary market.

Ex-Mariner Walks Away From $12M

Okay, Gil Meche hasn't been great since signing a big contract with the Kansas City Royals. But not many players would feel so badly about their performance that they would walk away from a guaranteed $12 million. Meche announced last week he will retire, giving up the payday due on the last year of his deal. Meche has always been known for his integrity, according to The New York Times, but this move left the baseball world stunned. Meche said he just didn't like the idea of not earning his keep/Greg Wilson, NBC Washington. More here. (AP file photo) H/T: Bent

Question: Could you walk away from $12 million, if you were unable to perform to earn it?