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Latest from The Spokesman-Review

Idaho selling some leftover big-game tags over-the-counter

HUNTING — Because some controlled hunt already have started, Idaho Fish and Game just announced it will not include leftover tags for those hunts in a second drawing in late August.

Rather than include them in the second drawings, which comes near the end of these hunts, Fish and Game has designated certain leftover controlled hunt tags to become available on a first-come, first-served, over-the-counter basis starting Aug. 7 at 9 a.m.

Read on for the list of hunts and numer of tags available.

Idaho controlled hunt drawing results out soon

HUNTING — The suspense is almost over for Idaho big-game hunters.

Results of special drawings for big-game controlled hunt tags will be available any day on the Idaho Fish and Game Department drawings web page.

Postcards will be mailed to successful applicants by July 10.

Ultimately, hunters must bear the responsibility to determine whether they've been drawn, state officials say.

Unsuccessful applicants will not be notified.

Winners must buy controlled hunt tags by Aug.1; any tags not purchased by that date will be forfeit.

Unclaimed and leftover tags from the first drawing will be available in a second application period Aug. 5-15.

After the second drawing, any tags left over are sold over the counter.

Washington already has conducted its special hunt drawings.

Apply now for surplus Idaho moose tags

HUNTING — Idaho Fish and Game is taking applications for a drawing for 11 leftover moose controlled hunt tags.

The application period runs through June 25. Any tags left over from this drawing will be available first-come first-served beginning July 10.

Read on for a list of the tags.

CdA River angler warns moose are edgy out there

WILDLIFE ENCOUNTERS — A fly fisher who accidentally spooked a cow and calf moose from their bed while moving through the brush along the Little North Fork of the Coeur d’Alene River had a tense encounter for 20 minutes the other day.

He was able to get up the only tree in the clearing during her charge, although he broke his Sage rod in the process.

He called the S-R to warn other anglers to be aware that moose are especially protective at this time.

“She was taking no prisoners,” he said.

Hard to believe, but Spokane hasn’t always had moose

WILDLIFE — After reading my blog about the moose poaching case on Beacon Hill, a woman who lived in this area from the 50s through the 70s wrote to say she never knew there were moose around Spokane.

It's not she wasn't observant.  Moose are relative newcomers to the region, showing up roughly with the first big waves of Californians.

Washington's moose population has been slowly growing since the first confirmed moose sighting was made in Pend Oreille County in the early '50's. Wildlife research pegged about 60 moose in the northeast corner of the state in the early '70s.

The first moose hunting season was authorized in 1977 with just three permits, all for the northeast portion of Pend Oreille County.

This year, 150 moose hunting permits are being offered for a moose population estimated at more than 1,000 — although that estimate appears to have been made before the wolves gained a foothold in northeastern Washington in recent years.

Since the 90s, moose have spread into Stevens and Spokane counties and beyond, where they've been showing up in towns, in school yards, in swimming pools on a hot day. A few people have been charged by moose.  Some have had the misfortune of colliding with moose on area roads.  Heck, one calf fell through a window into the basement bedroom of a home in north Spokane.

 They've only been common for a couple of decades, but nowadays everybody in this area has a moose story.

Suspects named in Beacon Hill moose poaching case

SPOKANE— Two brothers suspected of illegally killing a cow moose with archery gear on the north side of Beacon Hill in Spokane Valley around April 10 have been identified from the search warrant served in the case by Washington Fish and Wildlife Police.

Donald Gilbrech and San Gilbrech will be charged with several counts pending the results of DNA testing on the 95 pounds of moose meat seized from the men, Spokane officers said, without referring to the suspects by name.

Also confiscated was deer meat and Don Gilbrech's SUV, which contained moose hair and blood, the case report said.

A limited number of coveted special permits are required for hunting moose in Washington and the seasons are held in late summer and fall.

Fish and Wildlife Department officials say tips from the public helped officers make the case against the Gilbrechs.

An animal welfare group had offered a $2,500 reward for tips that lead to a conviction in the case.

Officers said a worker near Beacon Hill had seen a cow moose in the area.  Circling birds later prompted the informant to check out the area, where a moose head, guts and hide were found.

A bow and arrow matching the arrowhead found on scene were seized at San Gilbrech's house, officers said.

Each man faces fines of about $5,000 if convicted on the various possible charges for killing the moose and deer, officers said.
  

Beacon Hill moose poaching suspects nabbed

POACHING — An anonymous informant could soon be $2,500 richer after leading wildlife agents to moose poachers.

At least two suspects are being investigated for illegally killing a cow moose on the north side of Beacon Hill in Spokane Valley around April 10.

Washington Fish and Wildlife police report they have confiscated 95 packages of moose meat and the archery equipment used in the moose poaching.

Under a search warrant, officers also seized the vehicle they suspect was used for transporting the moose off the popular recreation area east of Esmeralda Golf Course.

Formal charges are pending results of DNA testing on the meat, said Madonna Luers, the agency’s spokeswoman in Spokane.

An anonymous tip led officers to the evidence, she said.

If the suspects are convicted, the informant is eligible for a $2,500 reward offered by a national animal welfare group.

Moose killed on Beacon Hill; officer seeks tips

POACHING — A cow moose was illegally killed Monday night on Beacon Hill in Spokane Valley, Washington Fish and Wildlife police say.

The poachers killed the animal using archery equipment on the north side of the mountain above Valley Springs road.

The animal was butchered on the spot, leaving little more than the two front feet and head behind.

Tire tracks indicate a small vehicle was used, possibly a small four-wheel drive, said Officer Dave Spurbeck.  A landowner heard a vehicle leaving the area around 2 a.m. Tuesday.

Officers have few other clues and welcome any information that might help solve the case.

  • Call the investigators directly: Officer Paul Mosman, 710-5707, or Spurbeck, 993-3997. You can remain anonymous and still be elligible for a reward.

Beacon Hill, which holds several communications towers, is the prominent mountain just north of the Spokane River and just east of Esmeralda Golf Course. It's popular with mountain biker and hikers.

This web page details how poaching tips in any case can be provided anonymously by phone, email or text message.   Rewards are offered.

Otherwise call (877) 933-9847 anywhere in the state.

To reach the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Spokane Region Office during work hours, call (509) 892 1001.

NI Blogs: Spirit Lake Moose At Play

On her Facebook wall, KXLY meterologist Kris Crocker posts this photo from a viewing friend, with the note: “Frequent 'Pic of the Night' contributor Cindy Murphy has done it again! I LOVE this shot of two moose playing on her property in Spirit Lake. She says there have been four moose hanging around the past couple of days. Isn't the Inland Northwest amazing?”

HucksOnline numbers (for Wednesday): 8349/4937; and (for Thursday): 8012/4942

Wife uses shovel to defend husband against attacking moose

WILDLIFE ENCOUNTERS — This just in from Alaska:  A woman used a shovel to scare away a moose that was stomping on her husband. 

Maybe this would be no big deal — she probably did make the “for better or worse” vow at the altar — but consider this:  The woman is 85 years old — and Alaska moose are even bigger than those found in Washington and Idaho.

See the Anchorage Daily News story and photos.

Winter doesn’t chill bighorn ram’s desire

WILDLIFE WATCHING — The party's over for elk.  Bull moose have given up on the girls.  Deer are losing their urges and getting serious about consuming enough calories to endure the winter.

Meanwhile, bighorn sheep are getting it on.

December is the peak of the rut for the masters of rock ledges, as the males earn their names by ramming heads together to determine who's the fittest to breed.

The bighorn ram pictured above is lip-curling at the beginning of December much as the whitetail buck was as it entered its peak of breeding in November.  

Wildlife photographer Jaime Johnson of Lincoln, Mont., captured the similar behavior of both animals with his camera.

When bucks or rams come to where a doe or ewe has urinated, they often curl their lips to trap the female's odor in their nose and mouth and analyze the scent for clues to the female's estrus stage.


  

Maybe a tractor rental should come with every moose tag

HUNTINGDon Gunter of Post Falls had all the tools for going out to fill the coveted Idaho moose tag he drew this year: Rifle, pickup, knives and saws, strong hunting partner…

But he also was prepared for the bigger job of handling a moose.

After passing up three bulls, he finally took this beauty where he could use the winch on his ATV to drag it whole into the back of his pickup.

To complete the job, he had a tractor front loader at home to raise the carcass for skinning.

He looks to be the perfect moose hunting partner for the next guy to draw a tag for an animal that easily weighs 800 pounds.

Landers: Where To Go To See Moose

A reader emailed me today asking where he could bring a friend from out-of-state to see a moose. Most of us who live in this region take moose for granted.  We see them regularly, if not predictably. Seeing a moose for the first time would be a big deal for this reader and his friend.  But where to send them? I had a moose in my yard near Hangman Creek a few weeks ago, but I haven't seen hide nor hair of the bull since. Mike Miller of Spokane snapped a photo of this bull moose on Wednesday while dayhiking along the Little Spokane River. Just last year, moose were chasing dogs accompanying hikers in the Dishman Hills. I put out a few queries to Fish and Game officers. So far, they haven't come up with an area where you could regularly be likely to drive up and see a moose, although moose are being poached not far from I-90 near Cataldo/Rich Landers, SR Outdoors. More here.

DFO: Is there anyone out there beside me who hasn't seen a moose on the loose around town?

Question: Where would you tell a visitor to go, if s/he wanted to see a moose?

Where would you go to see a moose?

WILDLIFE WATCHING — A reader emailed me today asking where he could bring a friend from out-of-state to see a moose.

Most of us who live in this region take moose for granted.  We see them regularly, if not predictably. Seeing a moose for the first time would be a big deal for this reader and his friend.  But where to send them?

I had a moose in my yard near Hangman Creek a few weeks ago, but I haven't seen hide nor hair of the bull since.

Mike Miller of Spokane snapped a photo of this bull moose on Wednesday while dayhiking along the Little Spokane River.

Just last year, moose were chasing dogs accompanying hikers in the Dishman Hills.

I put out a few queries to Fish and Game officers. So far, they haven't come up with an area where you could regularly be likely to drive up and see a moose, although moose are being poached not far from I-90 near Cataldo.

One moose was killed in a collision with a motorist off Highway 2 just north of Spokane this week and another was killed by a vehicle two weeks ago off Highway 195 just south of town.

Moose are all around Spokane and Coeur d'Alene, and up the logging roads throughout the region. I saw one near Liberty Lake last week. Elk hunters have told me they've been seeing more moose than elk up the logging roads from Idaho's St. Joe River area to 49 Degrees north in Washington.

 But it's tricky to tell somebody where he could go out and see one tomorrow.

Hunter numbers down, poachers up, Idaho Fish and Game officers say

HUNTING ENFORCEMENT — “I patrolled nearly 2000 miles of back roads during October and encountered fewer elk hunters and far fewer elk camps than in the recent past,” said Jerry Hugo, Idaho Fish and Game Department conservation officer in North Idaho. “Panhandle resident elk camps far outpaced non-resident elk hunting camps this fall.”

But there's been no shortage of poachers, officers say.

Tips are being sought to help nab whomever killed two moose shot and wasted near Cataldo around Oct. 29.

District Officers operated several bull and cow elk decoys during closed seasons in an effort to enforce our current Panhandle big-game regulations.

“I saw and heard from hunters that they were seeing LOTS and LOTS of moose,” Hugo said. “Moose are definitely enjoying the abundance of the new found forage in Unit 6 and are not as vulnerable to severe winter weather conditions as elk and deer are. But the roads make moose far more vulnerable to poachers.

Some hunters might think they're a cut above a poacher by putting out salt licks in Idaho to lure big game. While that's legal in some states, it's illegal in Idaho.

“District Officers found several more salt licks this fall,” Hugo said. “Officers are gathering the locations of every salt lick that we find and we are saving the GPS coordinates. It is unlawful and unfair chase to hunt elk over any form of salt.

“Idaho Geologists assure us that there are NO naturally occurring salt licks in north Idaho. We are currently devising ways to catch these poachers on site.”

Idaho Fish and Game seeks tips on 2 moose poached near Cataldo

POACHING – Idaho Department of Fish and Game officials are seeking tips to help them nab poachers involved in killing two bull moose on or around Oct. 29. The bulls were killed within 25 yards of each other in French Gulch near Frost Peak in the Cataldo area.

The poacher or poachers took only the hind quarters of one moose.  The remainder of the usable meat from this illegally taken moose was wasted. The entire second moose was left and wasted.  Both were field dressed and the carcasses propped open as if the perpetrators were planning to return to retrieve more meat. 

Anyone with information should call:

  • Officer Mark Bowen, (208) 660-4655, or
  • Idaho Fish and Game office in Coeur d'Alene, (208)769-1414, or
  • Citizens Against Poaching hotline, (208) 632-5999. 

Callers may remain anonymous and are eligible to receive a cash reward. 

Local sportsmen begin selling moose raffle tag

HUNTING — Tickets for Washington’s 2012 raffle tag go on sale Tuesday (Nov. 1). The $10 tickets are a good deal, and they make a good gift for a big-game hunter.

The Inland Northwest Wildlife Council is selling the tickets on behalf of the Washington Department of Wildlife.  For its efforts, the council gets 10 perecent of the sales to apply to the group’s wildlife conservation efforts.

The state agency earmarks the rest of the money for moose management.

Here are the other details:

  • The tag is good next year for Eastern Washington’s Region 1, the state’s hotbed for moose.
  • Bag limit: one moose of either sex.
  • Any open moose unit.
  • Season: Sept. 1 – Dec. 31.
  • Any legal weapon.
  • Open to residents or nonresidents.

Tickets may be purchased by phone, (509) 487-8552, or at the INWC office, 6116 N. Market. A maximum of 3,000 tickets will be sold.

The drawing will be held July 1.

Moose gets cold reception near Pasco; makes hot meals for needy

WILDLIFE — Moose are finding new hazards in Eastern Washington as they stray from their strongholds in the wooded northeast portion of the state and wander west into the Columbia Basin.

This bull moose slipped into an irrigation canal and, like most wildlife and a few humans who get into this situation, it couldn't get out.

Tired from struggling with the steep sides and swift flowing water in the Esquatzel Diversion Channel, it curled up to rest on a clump of grass growing out of cracks in the concrete lined irrigation canal Monday about six miles north of Pasco, according to the Associated Press.

An officer from the Department of Fish and Wildlife later shot the animal because officials couldn’t determine a safe way to rescue the bull.

The meat will be donated to the Tri-City Union Gospel Mission.

Buying moose raffle tag was the least of his expenses

BIG-GAME HUNTING — Todd Klement of Spokane just received the official letter informing him that he'd won the state-sponsored raffle for a coveted 2011 Wasington moose hunting permit.

“I could use any tips or directions on where to start looking,” he said in an email announcing his lucky draw.

“I had forgotten I even bought a raffle ticket until they called me last week. For awhile I thought someone was playing a joke on me until I got the certified letter in the mail. 

“The chance at the raffle was only $10 but after my trip to Cabela's last night I see this moose is going to cost me.

“I told the wife I needed new stuff to hunt moose. She rolled her eyes like she always does.”

And he hadn't even got around to mentioning that they'll probably need a bigger freezer.

Trail cam documents big-game fattening for fall

WILDLIFE WATCHING — “Not many deer sightings, yet,” said Kevin Scheib of Colville, offering a report on what he's been docmenting with motion-activated game cams he's set up at various spots in Stevens County.

“But I've been haveing troubles with my camera's. One has been stolen. Bears keep readjusting my settings and I had a four piont bull elk rubbing on one.

“But anytime in the woods is good times!”

The photos he shares today show a cow and calf moose as well as several bull elk passing in front of the same camera this month.

  

Moose become canvas for new wildlife control tool

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT — When law enforcement officers arrived around 6 a.m July 5 to deal with three moose on Interstate 90 near Liberty Lake, they were armed with guns you can buy at a toy store.

Washington state troopers blocked I-90 traffic while state Fish and Wildlife police “escorted” three yearlings out of traffic toward the Spokane River. To keep the moose moving, the officers used paintball guns.

“Two officers went at them on foot and stung them every now and then with the paintball guns,” said Capt. Mike Whorton of the Washington Fish and Wildlife Department. “Pretty soon they ran across all four lands of I-90 and out of the way of traffic.”

Whorton said one of his officers tested his own paintball gun last year for harassing and moving wildlife out of danger. The test was so successful, a local sportsmen's group has purchased paintball guns for all of the area Fish and Wildlife police, he said.

“Paintball guns can get off a lot of shots rapidly and accurately,” he said. “They are so much more effective and cost effective than the rubber bullets we had been firing out of 12-gauge shotguns. And aside from some pink paint on their rumps, the paintballs don't do any more than sting the moose.”

Paintball guns deter I-90 moose at Liberty Lake

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT — Nevermind the Tasers and high-powered weaponry in their vehicles. When law enforcement officers arrived around 6 this morning to deal with three moose on Interstate 90 near Liberty Lake, they were armed with guns you can buy at a toy store.

Washington State Troopers blocked I-90 traffic while state Fish and Wildlife Police “escorted” three yearlings out of traffic toward the Spokane River. To keep the moose moving, the officers used paintball guns.

“Two officers went at them on foot and stung them every now and then with the paintball guns,” said Capt. Mike Whorton of the Washington Fish and Wildlife Department. “Pretty soon they ran across all four lands of I-90 and out of the way of traffic.”

Whorton said one of his officers tested his own paintball gun last year for harassing and moving wildlife out of danger. The test was so successful, a local sportsmen's group has purchased paintball guns for all of the area Fish and Wildlife police, he said.

“Paintball guns can get off a lot of shots rapidly and accurrately,” he said. “They are so much more effective and cost effective than the rubber bullets we had been firing out of 12-gauge shotguns. And aside from some pink paint on their rumps, the paintballs don't do any more than sting the moose.”

WILDLIFE UNDERPASS NEEDED

The larger issue, Whorton emphasized, is that the Liberty Lake area is a natural migration corridor for moose, elk and deer.

“The Department of Transportation needs to install a freeway underpass for wildlife in that area,” he said. “It's a safety issue for wildlife and the motorists.  A woman was killed near there after hitting a moose a couple of years ago.”

Moose on the loose

Spokesman-Review (and Valley Voice)  photographer J. Bart Rayniak didn't have to wander far this weekend to take a great photo of a napping moose. He only had to go as far as his back yard in Otis Orchards. I'll let Bart tell it himself.

“This female moose wandered into Spokesman-Review photographer J. Bart Rayniak's yard in Otis Orchards, Saturday morning, May 14, 2011, and made herself comfortable for the day, resting in the shade and foraging on flowering cherry blossoms and bushes. According to Washington Fish and Wildlife officer Paul Mosman, although quite docile, moose are unpredictable, so it's best to put your dogs inside, and keep your distance until they wander away, which this young lady did at dusk.”

While I'm sure the moose was nice to watch (from a distance), I kind of feel sorry for Bart's dog. She probably had to stay inside all day.

Even moose enjoy creature comforts

WILDLIFE WATCHING — This female moose wandered into Spokesman-Review photographer J. Bart Rayniak's yard in Otis Orchards, Saturday morning and made herself comfortable for the day, resting in the shade and foraging on flowering cherry blossoms and bushes.

Looks like humans aren't the only ones who enjoy a nap on a carpet of green grass.

Although they're quite docile, moose also are unpredictable, said Paul Mosman, Washington Fish and Wildlife police officer.

It's best to put your dogs inside, and keep your distance until they wander away, which this young moose lady did at dusk.

Moose Collapses On Car On H95

Under the influence of a tranquilizer dart, a 600-pound bull moose walked onto U.S. 95 Monday morning and collapsed on the trunk of a woman's car. Idaho Fish and Game officers located the moose after receiving a call around 10 a.m., according to Regional Wildlife Manager Jim Hayden. The bull, most likely a yearling, was reported near the Kootenai County Sheriff's campus on Government Way, then strolled over to Dalton Children's Center on Dalton Avenue. While the moose was lying down next to the building, officers fired an air-powered dart into its leg, Regional Conservation Officer Craig Walker said. The moose rose, wandered into the middle of U.S. 95, and fell against the trunk of a small sedan stopped at the Dalton Avenue red light. Its upper body rested against the vehicle, while its legs remained on the street/Nick Rotunno, Press. More here. (KCSD courtesy photo shows moose hiding behind bush at sheriff's office)

Question: What would you do if you encountered a wandering moose in your yard?

Photo Of The Day — 4.11.11

A wandering moose apparently had some business with the Kootenai County Sheriff's Department this morning. Major Ben Wolfinger emails this photo to Huckleberries Online that shows an increasingly regular sight in urban areas around Kootenai County. You write the cutline. (Courtesy photo: Kootenai County Sheriff's Department)

Top Cutlines:

  • 1. Having had a terrible split with him in the past, once Bullwinkle heard Rocky was going to retire he decided it was time to stop by, bury the hatchet and wish him well — KeithinCdA.
  • 2. According to Sheriff’s Lieutenant, Kim Edmondson, the moose was at the Sheriff’s Office to get a Concealed Weapon Permit due to the increasing wolf problem — Ben Wolfinger.
  • 3. (tie) Having lost their 7th in a row, the Mariner Moose was spotted headed East saying, without Dave Niehaus it aint worth it” — TalkJOC; and: After enjoying a few too many cocktails at the Beacon and spending a night in jail for accosting Mrs Mudgy the Moose in downtown, Bullwinkle wanders off to sober up — CoeurGenX.
  • HM: Everyone else (superb cutlines today)

Odds were good for winning 2011 Washington moose raffle tag

HUNTING Relatively speaking, the odds were excellent for drawing Washington's coveted 2011 moose raffle tag.

Lloyd Hoppner of Colville won the coveted tag to hunt a prolonged season anywhere moose hunting is allowed in Eastern Washington in the drawing held last weekend at the Big Horn Outdoor Adventure Show.

His ticket was drawn from a pool of only 1,000 tickets, down from a pool of 3,000 tickets last year, Wanda Clifford, executive director of the Inland Northwest Wildlife Council, said Friday.

The council does the work of running the raffle to raise money for wildlife conservation projects while 10 percent of the proceeds go to the Washington Fish and Wildlife Department for moose management.

The special permit is a good deal, especially since some hunters have put-in fruitlessly for 20 years without drawing permit in the general state lottery drawing.

One has to wonder why more hunters didn't buy the $10 raffle tickets.  The economy?  Maybe they just don't understand the program.

Savvy big-game hunters know they can boost odds by entering the raffles as well as the normal state lottery in which they get one chance among about 31,400 applicants vying for one of 138 tags.

Of the 3,000 moose raffle tickets sold last year, Clifford estimated they were sold to fewer than 300 hunters.

She didn't have figures for how many hunter bought the 1,000 tickets this year, but it's clear the odds were good for those who did.

Residents and nonresidents are eligible to buy tickets, and the hunting license and tag is awarded to the raffle winner at no extra charge. That makes the tag a real deal for a nonresident.

The “once-in-a- lifetime” restriction is waived.

If selected, any legal weapon may be used.

Last chance: Moose tag raffle today at Big Horn Show

HUNTING — The Washington 2011 raffle moose tag will be drawn Sunday afternoon at the Big Horn Outdoor Adventure Show that's underway at the Spokane Fair and Expo Center.

The more $10 raffle tickets you buy, the better the odds for drawing a coveted chance to hunt with an either-sex tag anywhere moose hunting is allowed in far-Eastern Washington.

The state is letting the Spokane-based Inland Northwest Wildlife Council handle the ticket sales in person or by phone or mail. A small percentage of the sales are used for wildlife conservation projects in this region; the rest goes to the state for moose management.

Here are a few details that sweeten the deal:

  • Residents and nonresidents are eligible to buy tickets, and the hunting license and tag is awarded to the raffle winner at no extra charge.
  • The “once-in-a- lifetime” restriction for a moose tag is waived.
  • If selected, any legal weapon may be used.
      

The moose raffle tag drawing is set for Sunday at the Big Horn Show, along with raffle drawings for a fine selection of firearms.
  

How to kill big-game with a snowmobile

WINTER SPORTS — I wish I could say it's uncommon for people to chase wildlife on motor vehicles, but it's not.  I've seen it often,  and heard about it more often.

And some people, such as the snowmobiler above in Colorado, are bold enough to post their ignorance on YouTube.

This is ignorance in a spotlight. We all know it happens in this region, too.  We should never let it go on without comment or referal to wildlife authorities.

Moose in particular will sometimes run long distances in front of a snowmobile to take advantage of the packed trail. It happens on roads, too.   Pushing an animal to extremes, especially in winter, can leave them vulnerable to death in their winter-weak conditions.

By the way, it's against the law.

Hunters frame Idaho Panhandle big-game hunt proposals

HUNTING — The Idaho Fish and Game Department has just posted its big-game hunting season proposals for the Panhandle region, based on biologists surveys and adjustments after taking comment from hunters at recent public meetings.

The proposals that will go the the Fish and Wildlife Commission for approval are:

  • Little change from last year for bear, cougar and deer seasons.
  • Returning to more liberal hunting opportunity for elk in the northern six units (1,2,3,4,4A, and 5).
  • Modifying the original proposal for other elk untis:  Unit 6 to be essentially the same as last year, but with just two days of either-sex elk hunting.  
  • Units 7 and 9 elk hunting would still go to bulls-only as originally proposed.

Hunters were in high agreement to most of the original proposals, but about equally divided on whether or not to hunt cow elk in the St. Joe country, hense the compropmise on unit 6.

Read on for the detailed explaination by Jim Hayden, Idaho Fish and Game's regional wildlife manager.