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  • Then and Now: Keneseth Israel Synagogue

    There have been Jewish people in Spokane at least since businessman Simon Berg set up a dry goods store in 1879. Recounted in a 2008 article by Jim Kershner in …


  • Pre-eruption Mount St. Helens film found, developed

    VANCOUVER, Wash. – They’re brand new images of a Northwest icon that disappeared more than 33 years ago: the conical summit of Mount St. Helens. Reid Blackburn took the photographs …


  • Then and Now photos: Lubin’s store

    Barnett “Ben” Goldstein often said he and friend Harry Lubin were born in “the old world” in Vilna, Poland. “We were playmates and fostered the same ideals. We looked together …


  • Then and Now photos: Downtown storefront shines during holidays

    Christmas decorations displayed by retailers or retail groups have been a historical part of the downtown holiday scene. Wreaths, lighted silhouettes, painted windows and window displays at stores like the …


  • Create holiday décor using favorite photos

    The holidays are a great time to pull out the old photos and reminisce, but there’s no need to huddle around a dusty album. There are a variety of ways …


  • Then and Now photos: Pawn shops on Spokane’s West Main Avenue

    In the 1962 photo below, a sign on the left reads “E-Z Loans.” The building was occupied by Millman Jewelers and E-Z Loan, a shop started by Henry and Sadie …


  • Then and Now photos: Jack Sullivan’s valley homestead

    Sullivan Road in Spokane Valley is named after an early settler, John P. “Jack” Sullivan, who was born in County Cork, Ireland, in 1846. He ventured to the United States …


  • Portrait of Yakama Indian Lokout adds to history of brother Qualchan

    From 1907 to 1930, Seattle photographer Edward Curtis released 20 volumes of “The North American Indian,” a project that comprised 1,500 photographs of American Indians from tribes across the country. …


  • Then and Now photos: Lewis and Clark High School

    The earliest predecessor to Spokane’s Lewis and Clark High School was a four-room, two-story schoolhouse called Central School, which opened in 1883. The all-ages school filled quickly, and in 1890 …


  • Then and Now: Removing rails leads to rebirth

    One of the biggest changes to downtown Spokane’s waterfront was the removal of the rails. In the 1960s, city boosters began to dream of a world’s fair around the falls. …


  • Then and Now photos: Spokane County Courthouse

    Spokane sprang from the ashes of the great fire of 1889, and many distinctive structures, including the Review Tower, were built in early 1890s. But building came to a screeching …


  • Then and Now photos: Banks by bridge once ‘Shacktown’

    For several decades, a collection of shacks lined the Spokane River downstream from the Monroe Street Bridge, beneath the trains that rattled along the rim of the gorge. The squatters, …


  • Then and Now photos: Ridpath built with mine money

    William M. Ridpath, born in 1845 in Putnam County, Ind., volunteered for service during the Civil War, serving two hitches before mustering out and attending college. Col. Ridpath taught school …


  • Then and Now photos: Kroll Building’s footprint filled

    William H. Kroll was already a successful lumberman in Michigan – and well into his 60s – when he came west in 1911 and stopped in St. Maries. Within three …


  • Then and Now: Civil War hero leaves legacy

    Col. David P. Jenkins was one of Spokane’s greatest benefactors. Before homesteading Spokane’s north side of the river, Jenkins, born in 1823, was a lawyer from Ohio, an acquaintance of …


  • Then and Now: Downtown fashion district

    Russell Walker was a salesman who spent much of his career selling women’s apparel. He was born in Seattle in 1902 and came to Spokane in 1916. As a teen, …


  • Then and Now photos: Wolverton Block

    Brothers Albert and William Wolverton built the first brick office building in Spokan Falls, the Wolverton Block, in 1881. J.T. Davie, a young brickmaker from Scotland, made it possible. He …


  • Then and Now: Blodgett Mercantile in 1915

    Charles A. Blodgett, born in 1893 in Victor, Mont., arrived in Spokane at 18 and went to work. He learned the retail business working at a North Monroe grocery store. …


  • Then and Now photos: North Division Street

    In 1932 the city of Spokane finished paving Division Street north to Francis. Because it was the northern end of the city limits at the time, Spokane County surveyed and …


  • Then and Now photos: Armour and Co. packing plant

    Philip Danforth Armour, born in 1832 in upstate New York, was an industrious young man who started a meat packing business with his brother Joseph at Chicago’s Union Stockyards in …


  • Then and Now photos: The mill that built Spokane

    When S.R. Scranton and J.J. Downing, Spokane’s first white settlers, walked up to the south channel of the river by the falls in 1871, they realized it was the perfect …


  • Then and Now photos: The Crescent

    The Crescent, Spokane’s homegrown department store, disappeared in 1988 when it was combined with the Frederick & Nelson brand. But it started off with a bang and is remembered fondly …


  • Then and Now photos: The fire of 1889

    It was a long, hot summer in 1889. Forest fires raged around the region, and Seattle had a catastrophic fire earlier that summer. But the bustling boom town of Spokane …


  • Then and Now photos: Monroe-Indiana intersection

    Not much is left from the early development at the intersection of Spokane’s Monroe Street, Indiana Avenue and Northwest Boulevard. Sturdy brick buildings have been replaced by restaurants and fast-food …


  • Then and Now: Spokane’s historic homes

    From elegant mansions to simple construction, Spokane’s historic homes provide an open window to the city’s past. It was a common practice in the early 20th century for local newspapers …


  • Then and Now: Cataldo’s legacy

    Joseph Cataldo was in frail health throughout his life, but he built an immense spiritual legacy across the Inland Northwest. Born in Sicily in 1837, the studious young Jesuit with …


  • Then and Now: Schade Brewery

    The Schade Brewery was among several to open around the turn of the 20th century to slake the thirst of working men in Spokane. German immigrant Bernhardt Schade arrived in …


  • Then and Now photos: Streetcar era

    Spokane’s streetcar era started in 1888 with the first horse-drawn cars riding on tracks to a new neighborhood: Browne’s Addition. Developers hoped new service would encourage families to move a …


  • Then and Now photos: Get the goods

    Although the first transcontinental railroad connected through Spokane in 1882, north-south travel was still laborious and slow, by saddle or in wagons, for long trips to places like Colville and …


  • Then and Now photos: Horse slaughter

    In 1858, Eastern Washington was still closed to outside settlement, but hardy trappers, prospectors and traders traversed the region. After Indians killed two prospectors, Lt. Col. Edward Steptoe was sent …

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