Arrow-right Camera

Tags


Everything tagged


Sort by:

Stories tagged: photos


  • Then and Now: Morris Block

    The Morris Block was built on the northeast corner of Sprague Avenue and Post Street in 1890, in the wake of Spokane’s fire of 1889. The Great Eastern building, above …


  • Share seasonal photos with us

    The sun is shining, the playfields are full and the birds are singing. We’d like to see your best seasonal photographs for Picture Perfect, our community scrapbook of photos from …


  • Then and Now: Auditorium Theater, demolished in 1934

    The Auditorium Theater highlighted Spokane as the outpost of culture on the western plains. The building’s owners, John Browne and Anthony Cannon, arrived in the dusty village of Spokan Falls …


  • King Collection: Picnics in the park

    On the first day of hot weather at the end of April, young women throughout the Inland Northwest dressed for the heat and walked through the region’s parks in short-shorts, …


  • Then and Now: Bloomsday

    The Lilac Bloomsday Run welcomed runners and walkers for the 36th time this year, a long way from its modest start. Encouraged by the mayor and bolstered by sponsors and …


  • Then and Now: Gonzaga’s former football stadium

    In the photo above, Gonzaga University’s football stadium dominates the east side of the campus. Before World War II, the university had a pretty good run as a football school. …


  • Then and Now photos: Riverfront Park

    Although explorers, traders and missionaries had traveled on horseback through the area since the early 1800s, the first white settlement at Spokane Falls was in 1871. James Glover built a …


  • Then and Now photos: Historic City Hall

    The Spokane City Hall erected in 1894 at Howard and Front streets symbolized the optimism of a plains boomtown, and then fell victim to its success. It cost $165,000 to …


  • Then and Now photos: Spokane Middle Falls

    The Spokane Middle Falls circa 1888: The wooden structure at the lower left is an early Spokane water works, which likely featured water turbine to drive pumps to get the …


  • Then and Now: Ready for war

    In the days following the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, Spokane began preparing for the next major attack. Spokane radio stations went off the air so enemy aircraft couldn’t follow …


  • Then and Now: Dairy dreams

    Brothers George and David Brown wanted to make it big in the butter business. They journeyed to Spokane in 1888 and formed Hazelwood Farms, named after their father’s farm in …


  • Images from early 1900s look downright newsy

    They posed with their newspapers, these Spokane folks from the early 1900s. The smiling man in the top hat. The woman in the watercolor portrait. And F.N. LaVell, businessman, relaxing …


  • Then and Now: Monroe Street

    The year 1891 was monumental for the town of Spokane Falls, which voted to change its name to Spokane – perhaps to sound more sophisticated and less rustic. Electricity was …


  • Then and Now photos: City Market

    An advertisement in a 1911 edition of the Spokane Chronicle declared that the City Market, at Second Avenue and Stevens Street, was built for the “economical housekeepers of Spokane.” The …


  • Then and Now photos: Loma Vista homes

    Homes were selling fast in the Loma Vista neighborhood in North Spokane in 1950. New schools, including Madison, Adams and Hamilton, were being built. The Spokesman-Review reported that year that …


  • Then and Now photos: Review Tower

    The Rev. Thomas G. Watson, a Presbyterian missionary from Waukesha, Wis., stepped off a train in Spokan Falls, as Spokane was then known, in 1883 to start a new church …


  • Then and Now: Empire start

    When the office block was built on the southwest corner of Lincoln Street and Riverside Avenue in 1900, it was named the Empire State Building in honor of New Yorker …


  • Then and Now photos: Legion Building

    It’s been called the Metals Building, the Assemblee Building and the American Legion Building. Spokane industrialist F. Lewis Clark built the elegant Renaissance Revival structure at West Riverside Avenue and …


  • Then and Now photos: Historic hub

    The dusty town of Spokane Falls, Washington Territory, was booming with railroads, timber and mining in the late 19th century as black settlers came looking for opportunities and a place …


  • Photos Then & Now: Corner of Riverside and Wall

    Edward Herbert Jamieson, an attorney who settled in Spokane in 1882, founded Spokane Abstract Co. and built a two-story brick building on the southwest corner of Riverside Avenue and Wall …


  • Photos Then and Now: Bright city night

    When a Spokane Chronicle photographer made a nighttime photo of South Stevens Street curving into West Ninth Avenue in 1966, Spokane was a bustling business center. Aluminum, timber products, chemicals, …


  • Public transit turned Spokane into urban center

    The streetcar parade of 1936 marked the end of an era and showed that Spokane held its lumbering streetcars in great affection even as the public bus, more versatile and …


  • Then & Now photos: Millwood, oldest city in Valley

    The town of Millwood was orignally named Woodard Station for a train stop on the Coeur d’Alene Spokane Railroad at the edge of Joseph and Seth Woodard’s land. The Woodards …


  • Then & Now: Interstate 90 transformed a region

    The interstate highway is something baby boomers and younger people take for granted. And though President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation to fund an interstate highway system June 29, 1956, …


  • Then & Now: Armory building

    The cavernous state armory building at 202 W. Second Ave. in downtown Spokane, built in 1909, once housed the Washington National Guard. Historian Carolyn Hage Nunemaker writes that it was …


  • Then and Now photos: The Clocktower

    The iconic Riverfront Park Clocktower was completed in 1902 as the centerpiece of the Great Northern Railroad depot. For decades it cast its shadow over Spokanites rushing to board trains, …


  • Historic stretch near courthouse still bustling

    Despite the Great Depression, Spokane was growing and building to the north, up the corridors of Monroe, Washington, Howard and Division streets. The last of Spokane’s streetcars was retired in …


  • Albi Stadium

    It began as Memorial Stadium and has hosted Washington State University, the University of Idaho and Eastern Washington University football games – not to mention Elvis. But Spokane’s Joe Albi …


  • Photos: King made his fortune with Monroe Street grocery

    Spokane grew around the rocky falls of the river, but soon after the furious growth of the 1880s and 1890s, Spokane’s footprint began to expand north. As neighborhoods sprang up, …


  • Photos Then & Now: Glitzy Garland Theatre opened in 1945

    Good wishes came via telegram from superstars Bing Crosby, Cary Grant and Bob Hope when the Garland Theatre opened in 1945. The stylish interior, the record and gift shop in …