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Post Falls Leads Local Growth

Post Falls led local cities in population growth from 2012 to 2013, according to a report released on Thursday by the Idaho Department of Labor. Post Falls grew 2.5 percent — from 28,650 residents in 2012 to 29,357 in 2013. “From a city and bank perspective, we're seeing the economy firm up,” said Post Falls Mayor Ron Jacobson, who is also a senior vice president of Inland Northwest Bank. “It's still not as strong as we'd like to see, but at the same token you don't want to see rampant growth because that's difficult keeping up with.” Jacobson said he's not surprised at the growth rate because Post Falls, the state's 10th-largest city, has affordable housing and the city has the room to grow onto the Rathdrum Prairie. Post Falls' population growth was the ninth-largest among all cities in the state. Star grew 6.7 percent, topping all cities. Coeur d'Alene grew 1.8 percent from 45,592 to 46,402. It is the state's seventh-largest city/Brian Walker, Coeur d'Alene Press. More here.

Question: Are you happy with the way Kootenai County is growing?

County Population Up Nearly 1%

Jen Franklin doesn't want Kootenai County to get too big, but small population increases are fine. “If we grow a little, that's always a good sign,” the Post Falls woman said outside the Post Falls Library on Thursday. “I think small, gradual growth is healthy … as long as work is available.” Kootenai's population rose 0.89 percent from 141,103 in June 2011 to 142,357 June 2012, according to data released on Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau. While that's a far cry from the 3 to 5 percent gains that were common before the recession, some metropolitan areas, including Boise and Gem counties, both part of the Boise area, had population declines/Brian Walker, Coeur d'Alene Press. More here.

Question: Do you think Kootenai County has too many people living in it?

Huetter Grew Most Percentagewise

Idaho's largest cities are growing at about three times the pace of its smaller communities, according to new population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. As of July 1, 2011, Idaho's estimated population was 1,584,985, up 13,883 or 0.9 percent from the year before. The state's 10 largest cities accounted for 9,541 of that increase, according to the agency. They grew at the rate of 1.4 percent, compared to a 0.48 percent growth rate for the 190 smaller communities it tracks. The bureau released its 2011 city and town population estimates for all states Thursday. Idaho doesn't try to provide more up-to-date estimates. Washington, which tracks population data independently, released it 2012 population estimates last week. Huetter, a tiny community on the outskirts of Coeur d'Alene, had the highest population growth in the state last year, according to the census estimates. It grew by 2 percent, or two people/William Spence, Lewiston Tribune. More here.

Question: How would you rate the size of your North Idaho community: too big? too small? just right?

Spokane stays ahead of Tacoma in population

OLYMPIA — The honor of the Avis of Washington population goes once again to Spokane.

The state Office of Financial Management released its annual population estimates today, which show overall population is up slightly, pretty much all around the state.

Seattle, of course, is the largest city. Spokane is No. 2, with an estimated 210,000. Tacoma is third at 199,600. For more numbers, check out this story on the main webpage.

The race to place sometimes sets off a competition between some newspaper columnists in the two cities. Spin Control has not engaged in denigrating Tacoma in the past, and will refrain from doing so now. But we can't speak for some of our ink-stained brethren.

Spokane Remains Washington’s No. 2

Washington grew slowly — less than 1 percent — in the last year from a slight increase in people moving into the state, the Office of Financial Management said today. The annual estimate of state population said net migration, the difference between the number of people moving in and those moving out, had been falling since 2007, but that turned around in 2011 for a slight uptick. For the year ending April 1, the state gained an estimated 49,870 persons, making the overall population 6,817,770, OFM said. Seattle is the largest city, with an estimated population of 616,500. Spokane remains second, at 210.000, ahead of Tacoma at 199,600. The City of Spokane Valley remains the state’s 10th largest, with 90,550/Jim Camden, SR. More here. (Christopher Anderson SR file photo)

Question: Izzit just me, or is Spokane proud to be Washington state's equivalent of Avis?

Rural Idaho loses population

Population decline in rural Idaho intensified in 2011, new U.S. Census Bureau estimates show.

More people left the state’s rural areas between mid-2010 and mid-2011, and more counties lost population than at any other time since the 1980s. Eighteen of the 33 rural counties saw population declines.

In the Idaho Panhandle, Benewah, Bonner, Boundary and Shoshone counties all lost population between July 1, 2010, and July 1, 2011, according to Census Bureau estimates. Kootenai County gained about 2,200 residents, or 1.6 percent, in the same period.

Statewide population rose 13,883 – almost entirely in 11 urban counties, the figures show.

Nine counties posted more deaths than births during the one-year period. They include Beneweh, Boundary, Shoshone, Clearwater, Lewis and Nez Perce counties in North Idaho.

Slow recovery also spells slower population growth

Washington’s population continues to grow, but at a slower rate.

The 2011 population estimate prepared by the Office of Financial Management places the state's population at 6,767,900 as of April 1. That represents an increase of 43,360, or a growth rate of 0.64 percent from the state’s official 2010 census count.

It's an unexpected slowdown in population growth, the agency said today, and is due to slower than expected economic recovery. That affects both natural population increase (births minus deaths) and migration into Washington.

Migration is a major component of the state’s growth. This year’s net migration is estimated at 6,600, the lowest level in more than two decades, OFM says.

Worker mobility remains low nationwide because of difficulties with selling homes and finding work. Part of the overall decrease in migration is due to a decline in international migration.

17 North Idaho Towns Lose Population

Here are the North Idaho towns that lost population from mid-2008 to mid-2009: Bonners Ferry, -29; Clark Fork, -2; East Hope, -1; Kellogg, -33; Kootenai, -1; Mullan, -12; Oldtown, -1; Osburn, -22; Pinehurst, -23; Plummer, -18; Ponderay, -3; Priest River, -7; Smelterville, -10; St. Maries, -41; Tensed, -2; Wallace, -13; Wardner, -3. You can read all the gains and losses for Idaho’s 200 towns in the Idaho Department of Labor census report here.

Question: What size would you say is a perfect population for a town?

CdA Gains 719 People, Post Falls, 594

Coeur d’Alene gained an estimated 719 new residents between 2008 and 2009 to move from the seventh to the sixth largest town in Idaho. Meanwhile, Dalton Gardens gained 15 people in the same time period; Hayden gained 268; Post Falls (9th largest town), 594; Rathdrum, 165; and Sandpoint, 13. Other changes include: Athol, 3 new residents; Fernan, 1; Hauser, 3; Hayden Lake, 7; Huetter, 1; Spirit Lake, 27; State Line, 0; and Worley, 57. Several Shoshone County towns lost population. Overall, Betsy Russell/Eye On Boise reports that a quarter of Idaho’s 200 towns lost population between July 1, 2008, and July 1, 2009. Idaho’s official population is now 1,545,801, or an increase of 18,295, for a 1.2% increase. You can read Betsy’s report (and find a link to the population change of Idaho towns) here.

Question: Are you comfortable with your community’s population?

From another perspective, Tacoma really is Washington’s second city

 

Our good friends at the political blog at The News Tribune in Tacoma appear to be challenging us to a friendly Swivel chart war.

Responding to our bar chart showing that Spokane is the second largest city in the state — with a 2,000-person lead over Tacoma — The News Tribune’s Political Buzz reminded us that Pierce County has a signficant lead over Spokane County and easily claims the highly coveted title of “Washington’s Second County.” We at Spin Control do not dispute this title, only its relevance.