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Prosecutors want Sanders off cases

SEATTLE (AP) — Prosecutors in five Washington counties want former Supreme Court Justice Richard Sanders barred from continuing to rule on cases — an effort he calls a blatant attempt to manipulate the court. 

Sanders (left) was narrowly defeated by Charlie Wiggins (right) in his bid for a fourth term last fall, and his tenure on the court expired last month.

Following historical practice, the remaining justices gave him an extra two months to wrap up the 70 or so cases in which he heard arguments that the court has not yet ruled on.

Previous temporary appointments of justices have garnered little attention, but the one given to Sanders — a self-described libertarian who often sides with defendants — raised the ire of prosecutors from King, Clallam, Snohomish, Skagit and Grant counties.

They asked the court to revoke it on the grounds that the state Constitution allows only judges or retired judges — not defeated ones — to be appointed pro-tem. 

The high court unanimously rejected the requests without explanation.

"It doesn't appear that there's any mechanism that allows him to be appointed as a pro-tem, so he probably shouldn't be appointed as a pro-tem," said Grant County Prosecutor Angus Lee. Sanders said Thursday the prosecutors singled him out because they don't like his views.

Click the link below to read the rest of the story by Associated Press writer Gene Johnson.

High court throws out murder conviction

SEATTLE (AP) — Washington's Supreme Court threw out a defendant's aggravated murder conviction Thursday because he wasn't present when his lawyers, prosecutors and judge agreed by e-mail to dismiss seven people from his jury pool.

In the 5-4 decision, the justices said criminal defendants have a right to be present at all critical trial stages — including the dismissal of jurors for hardship reasons. Terrance Irby was not there and was not consulted when his legal team agreed with a suggestion by Skagit County Superior Court Judge John Meyer that certain potential jurors be sent home.

"Their alleged inability to serve was never tested by questioning in Irby's presence," Justice Gerry Alexander wrote for the majority. "Indeed, they were not questioned at all."

The ruling was the second time that unseated Justice Richard Sanders has been in a 5-4 majority overturning a defendant's conviction since his term expired Jan. 10. Sanders, a libertarian who has often sided with defendants who come before the court, was defeated in his re-election bid by Justice Charles Wiggins last fall.

The remaining members of the court have appointed Sanders as a temporary judge to rule on cases whose oral arguments he heard before his term expired.

Skagit County prosecutors, however, tried to have Sanders kicked off Irby's case this month. They argued that the state Constitution allows only judges who retire voluntarily — not those whose authority has been revoked by the voters — to be appointed as temporary judges. If the remaining eight justices who heard the oral arguments were deadlocked, the case should be reheard with Wiggins sitting, they wrote.

The court unanimously denied the motion in a one-page order.

Irby, then 48, was convicted in 2007 of beating and stabbing an acquaintance, James Rock, two years earlier. He was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of release.

Skagit County deputy prosecutor Erik Pedersen said the state might ask to court to reconsider its ruling, but failing that, prosecutors will retry Irby.

The jurors were dismissed after filling out questionnaires evaluating their qualifications for serving on a jury, but before the process known as "voir dire," in which attorneys on each side question them about potential biases or other issues. Six were dismissed for hardship reasons, and one was dismissed after writing that one of his or her parents had been murdered.

The dissenting justices wrote that the hardship dismissals were administrative and well within the purview of the trial court; there was no reason Irby needed to be there for that. But the dismissal of the juror whose parent had been murdered was related to the substance of the case and therefore Irby should have been present, Chief Justice Barbara Madsen wrote.

Nevertheless, she said, that error was harmless: Defendants do not have a right to have a specific juror on their case, and there's no evidence the jury he had was biased against him.

"We should recognize and give effect to this distinction so that the constitutional right of a defendant to be present at critical stages of the trial is protected while at the same time preserving the trial court's discretion to make administrative decisions," Madsen wrote.

Justices Charles Johnson, James Johnson and Mary Fairhurst signed the dissent.

Justices Tom Chambers, Susan Owens and Debra Stephens joined Sanders and Alexander in the majority.

Irby's attorney, David Koch, called the decision extremely important.

"This reaffirms the right to be present for the selection of one's jury," he said.

Wiggins up by nearly 7,800

OLYMPIA — Ballot counting continues, if somewhat sporadically, around the state and the margin in the Supreme Court race grew slightly Monday.

Challenger Charlie Wiggins has 955,298 votes compare to incumbent Richard Sanders’ 947,618.

As previously reported, Wiggins lead is mathematically secure, even though there are about 76,000 ballots yet to be counted. That’s because more than half — an estimated 40,000 — are in King County, where Wiggins has been leading Sanders throughout the counting. Sanders hasn’t officially conceded, but he has sent an e-mail to supporters acknowledging that the race appears over.

In other close election news, Republican challenger has a 28 vote lead over Democratic Rep. Dawn Morrell in Pierce County’s 25th District, a race where the lead has changed hands several times in the last week.

State Supreme Ct Race: Wiggins closes gap, Sanders warns of ‘theft’

OLYMPIA — With challenger Charlie Wiggins closing the gap on Supreme Court Justice Richard Sanders— and some media outlets predicting Wiggins will win the race — Sanders’ campaign sent out a plea to supporters for money for a possible recount.

“Don’t let Wiggins steal this election” is the subject line of the e-mail asking for money for a fund “to get all the ballots counted.” It notes there are some 17,000 ballots that need to have voters clear up questions with signatures.

In an interview with AP’s Rachel La Corte, Sanders said he didn’t authorize the headline on the fund-raising e-mail and says it shouldn’t say that. (AP report can also be found inside the blog.)

If the phrase “The Don’t Let —— Steal This Election” sounds familiar, maybe it’s because the Building Industry Association of Washington used it on billboards in 2008 to generate support in Eastern Washington for Dino Rossi’s second gubernatorial run. Back then, the alleged thief was Seattle.

It’s pretty much the same sentiment, because Wiggins has nothing to do with counting ballots or validating signatures. If he wins, it will be on the strength of heavy turnout in King County, particularly the city of Seattle, where Sanders came under fire for comments some considered racist regarding the proportion of African Americans in prison compared to their representation in the state as a whole. After those comments he was “unendorsed”  by the Seattle Times about a week before the election.

WA ban on Internet gambling constitutional

OLYMPIA — Washington state’s ban on Internet gambling doesn’t run afoul of the U.S. Constitution’s protections of interstate trade, the state Supreme Court unanimously ruled today.

The high court upheld a King County Superior Court ruling, later affirmed by the Court of Appeals, against Renton lawyer Lee Rousso and his challenge of the 2006 law that makes online gambling a felony.

Janelle Guthrie, a spokeswoman for the state attorney general’s office, said that while online gambling was always considered illegal in the state, the 2006 law clarified that the Internet was included in the state and federal ban against remote gambling. The law also increased the charge from a gross misdemeanor to a felony. Full story.

Do you gamble?

Sanders gets 4 emails in disclosure case

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — An unanimous state Supreme Court on Thursday awarded Supreme Court Justice Richard Sanders four additional documents and additional legal fees in his public records lawsuit against the state.

Sanders (pictured) sued the state in 2005 after he was admonished for talking with residents at the state’s center for violent sexual predators at McNeil Island while some residents had pending court cases. He wants all documents related to the visit, including e-mail among state attorneys.

But the high court affirmed much of an earlier Thurston County Superior Court ruling that held that most of the more than 100 exempt documents Sanders was seeking were properly withheld.

The Supreme Court said four additional e-mails were improperly withheld and should have been released.

The court granted Sanders’ additional legal fees incurred during the appeal, and awarded him a penalty based on the additional documents released, but rejected his request for an increase in the penalty rate against the state.

Read the rest of the Associated Press story by clicking the link below.