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Remington recall rifles with trigger issue

SHOOTING — In April the Remington Arms Co. issued a nationwide recall of its Model 700 and Model Seven rifles equipped with the X-Mark Pro trigger saying that some may have “excess bonding agent” that could cause the rifles to accidentally fire.

The recall applies to all of the rifles that were manufactured between May 1, 2006, and April 9, 2014. Rifles manufactured after April 9 have already been repaired, according to a Billings Gazette story by outdoor writer Brett French.

“Remington has determined that some Model 700 and Model Seven rifles with XMP triggers could, under certain circumstances, unintentionally discharge,” reads a recall notification on the company’s website.

To participate in the recall, Remington Arms Co. recommends the following:

Step 1: Visit xmprecall.remington.com or call 1-800-243-9700 (Prompt #3 then Prompt #1) Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EDT. You will be asked to provide your name, address, telephone number, and rifle(s) serial number.

Step 2: Upon receipt of the information requested in Step 1, Remington will send you pre-paid shipping tags, boxes and written instructions. Remington will cover all related shipping, inspection and cleaning charges. Please ONLY return your rifle with the designated shipping tags and boxes, as they are marked to expedite the rifle to a dedicated Remington facility. 

Upon return of your rifle, you will note a punch mark on the bolt release. This mark confirms your rifle has been inspected and specialty cleaned under this recall program.

 

Hunters can zero-in rifles at Farragut, other ranges

SHOOTING — Hunters preparing their firearms for upcoming big-game seasons have a new option this year — the revamped range at Farragut State Park near Athol, Idaho.

The 100-yard Farragut Shooting Range reopened on June 1 after several years of closure while Idaho Fish and Game rebuilt the facility to increase safety and reduce noise at the 70-year-old range.

With big game hunting seasons fast approaching, the range will be open every Saturday for the rest of September through October, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., staffed by trained volunteers.  Cost $5 per shooter.

On Sept. 21, The Farragut Range will have a special Grand Opening. Shooters can check out the new and improved facility and sight-in rifles for free.  

Firearms are limited this year to rimfire and centerfire rifles of less than .50 caliber; and, shoulder-fired muzzle-loaded rifles.

Access to the range is through Farragut State Park, and participants must either be in possession of an annual Idaho State Park pass or pay the $5 daily use fee upon entering the park.  

The original range was built by the military and turned over to civilian use after WW2.

Info:  769-1414.

Area rifle clubs also open their ranges so non-member sportsmen can zero in rifles before the general hunting seasons.

  • Spokane Rifle Club  along the Spokane River downstream from the Bowl and Pitcher is open to nonmembers Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Cost: $20. 

The annual Sight-In Days are set for Oct. 2-5 from 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.  This is a great deal. For $20 for one rifle (cash or check) plus $5 for each additional rifle, the club offers a scope and firearm checkup before you hit the range plus assistance from a helper/spotter on the range, targets provided.   

Club rules require that all firearms should be unloaded when arriving at the range.

Ear and eye protection is required and available at the club if needed.

Info: 327-9632

The club is open daily to non-members, with shooting allowed from 8 a.m. to around 7 p.m. The fee is $10.

Info: (208) 666-8803.

Remington asks judge to dismiss Montanans’ lawsuit over rifle

SHOOTING  — Gun manufacturer Remington has asked a judge to dismiss a proposed class-action lawsuit by Montanans who bought a type of rifle that can reportedly misfire without the trigger being pulled.

According to the Associated Press, Allen Bowker and Eric Huleatt filed their lawsuit in June on behalf of thousands of Montana residents who purchased a Remington Model 700.

They allege the manufacturer’s parent companies knew the rifle’s trigger assembly was defective and did nothing to warn customers or fix the problem.

They are seeking a judge’s ruling that Remington owes them for their economic loss for overpaying for the defective rifles.

Attorneys for the manufacturer said Monday time has run out on the warranties for the two named plaintiffs who filed the complaint.

They say only one of the plaintiffs claims his gun actually misfired. 

Traditional muzzleader, pioneer craft show in Monroe

SHOOTING — The annual Muzzleloading Arms and Pioneer Craft Show —- sponsors say it's the largest show devoted to black-powder arms — will be held March 9-10 at the Evergreen State Fairgrounds in Monroe.

Presented by the Cascade Mountain Men, the show will be a showcase for traditional (pre-1840) muzzle loading firearms.

Gun builders will be there giving tips on their crafts among 300 traders and exhibitors.

Even non-shooters might be interested in the leather and fur goods, Native American crafts, period clothing and camping gear, beads, art and more.

Trader info: (425) 890-7208.

Rifle halts girlfriend’s unexpected move

Two movers had a rifle pointed at them when they showed up at their customer's boyfriend home to move her stuff out without his knowledge.

Homeowner Jaime R. Stout, 30, was jailed for first-degree assault after  said he'd pointed a rifle at them as they tried to move Stout's girlfriend's things out of his home in the 300 block of West Dalton Avenue on Friday.

Stout's girlfriend was moving out and asked David Smather, 46, and Kyle Parr, 26, of Spokane Movers to move her stuff without Stout's knowledge.

Stout, who told police he had been drinking, was released from jail on his own recognizance after appearing in Spokane County Superior Court on Monday.
  

Thief hits Homeland Security officer’s car

A Spokane woman is accused of stealing a federal Homeland Security officer's passport and and using it to pawn two stolen rifles.

 Investigators identified Amanda Wayne Macklin, 23, as a suspect after finding her number in Double Eagle Pawn's phone records. They say she called the pawn shop on Nov. 21 asking if a passport could be used to sell items there, then went to the East Sprague Avenue store and sold the stolen guns for $475 using a passport belonging to Shannon L. Hart.

Hart was at Oz Fitness at 603 E. Holland in Spokane on Nov. 20 when someone prowled her vehicle and stole her Homeland Security identification card, her passport and a Sig Sauer .40 caliber semi-automatic pistol, according to court documents.

Agents with the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms obtained surveillance video of a woman pawning the rifles, which were stolen in a burglary Nov. 21 at a home in the 12000 block of North Denver Street. Macklin's family members identified her as that woman, according to court documents. Macklin told them she dumped Hart's passport and pistol into a dumpster, investigators say.

Federal agents also obtained a recording of Macklin telling her mother in a phone call from the Spokane County Jail that she pawned the guns and burglarized other homes to support her and her sister's drug habit. Macklin and her sister, Jordan Newkirk, already are charged with several felonies for an alleged burglary ring.

In the Dec. 26 break-in, the thieves used a spring-loaded punch to break holes through a lower window at a home in the 100 block of West Falcon Avenue and stole thousands of dollars in jewelry, including a ring that contained the ashes of the homeowner's mother.

Police in Kent, Wash, had noted the unusual burglary tool in Macklin's Kia Spectra when they arrested her there four days before the burglary.

Spokane County sheriff's Detective Mark Newton noted in his report that he and his partner have been detectives for 45 years total and have never found anyone in possesses of such a device, which he said would shatter normal glass but didn't at the Falcon Avenue home because the glass was tempered.

"If one were to use such a punch on a normal piece of glass, the punch would shatter the glass leaving no indication a punch was used," Newton wrote in court documents.

Macklin was charged in that case in March. Prosecutors filed six new gun and property crime charges May 25 for theft of Hart's passport. Then a federal grand jury indicted her last week on a charge of unlawful possession and barter and disposal of a stolen firearm and misuse o a passport for allegedly dumping Hart's gun and passport.

TV host tells his side of Idaho illegal hunting citation

HUNTING — On March 20, I devoted my weekly Outdoors column to the case of Oregon hunter Bob Beck, a TV hunting show host, who pleaded guilty to shooting two deer in Idaho even though he had only one non-resident tag.

The  case was made a year after the 2010 hunt when a sportsman gave Idaho Fish and Game a tip after seeing the hunt and the killing of both deer on Beck's Extreme Outer Limits program, which aired on the Sportsman Channel. Beck did not own up to the illegal kill until he was confronted by authorities. The guilty plea was entered and the fines were assessed in February 2012.

Beck has issues with my reporting and commentary on the case. He's elaborated his concerns in posts at many online forums.

Indeed, he's working to have details on the outcome of the case changed. But as of this week, the ruling remains the same as I reported it on March 20 based on information from Idaho Fish and Game Department investigators and the Benewah County prosecutor.

I'll update any changes that develop in the case.

As of today, the case is still active in Oregon.

Meanwhile, you can hear Beck's version of the case in his own words in a radio interview conducted last week by John Kruse of Northwest Outdoors Radio.

The taped interview will air on the show as follows:

  • on 1240 KOFE in St. Maries Saturdays at 8 AM.
  • on 920 KXLY  in Spokane Sunday at 6 AM.
  • on 1230 KSBN in Spokane on Sunday at 2 PM.

Kruse also plans a follow-up interview with Beck..

Militia leader sentenced in grenade case

A self-described militia leader will spend a year and a day in prison for making grenades that he said were to fight off a communist invasion.

Kenneth B. Kimbley Jr., 60, was given an exceptionally low sentence this week in U.S. District Court in Coeur d'Alene after his public defender described his health problems, which include lung cancer. He'll be on home detention for one year after his release, serve three years probation and is to perform 100 hours of community service.

Federal prosecutors had requested he be sentenced to 46 months in prison for amassing a a weapons collection at his property at 28128 Highway 4, just south of Spirit Lake, where he was arrested on July 3, 2010, while making grenades with other militia members.

He pleaded guilty in November to unlawful possession of a firearm and attempt to make a firearm in violation of the National Firearms Act.

Kimbley had previously discussed bombing local bridges with an undercover federal agent and made threatening statements toward President Barack Obama, according to court papers, but his lawyer, Kim Deater, said he never threatened anyone and was simply saying things similar to what his idol, Glenn Beck, says.

Codefendent Steven E. Winegar, 52, of Harpster, Idaho, was sentenced last month to eight months of house arrest and five years of probation for illegal possessing a .45 pistol.

An undercover agent had been tracking the men through their militia ties since at least October 2009, when he first saw Kimbley with an AK-47 equipped with an electronic optical sight and bought a .22-caliber Ruger handgun from him.

Kimbley was convicted of felony aggravated assault in 2004, which means he's prohibited from possessing firearms.

Retired Spokesman-Review reporter Bill Morlin covered Kimbley's sentencing for the Southern Poverty Law Center. He reports that Judge Edward Lodge said it was “far-fetched” to think the arsenal of weapons and homemade bombs “would have any impact one way or another if there was an invasion from a communist country." Read Morlin's story here.

Man gets house arrest in grenade case

A North Idaho man who was arrested as part of a federal probe into illegal explosives manufacturing in Spirit Lake will be on house arrest for eight months and probation for five years.

Steven E. Winegar, 52, of Harpster, Idaho, was sentenced Monday in U.S. District Court in Coeur d'Alene, where Judge Edward Lodge cited his lack of criminal history, military service and the cost of caring for his medical and mental conditions when imposing the light sentence, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office.

Winegar pleaded guilty in December to illegal possession of a firearm for a .45 pistol he possessed on July 3, 2010, when FBI agents raided a trailer in the Spirit Lake area owned by Kenneth B. Kimbley, Jr.

Agents seized hand grenades, firearms and more than 10,000 rounds of rifle ammo from the property at 28128 N. Highway 41.

Kimbley, 59, is prohibited from possessing firearms because of a previous felony conviction. His lawyer said Kimbley never threatened anyone but feared a communist takeover and was inspired by his idol, Glenn Beck.

Kimbley pleaded guilty in November to attempting to make explosive devices and illegal possession of a firearm. Sentencing is set for August 8.

Seattle police leave rifle unattended

This handout photo, provided by Nick Gonzalez for editorial purposes only, shows a police rifle left unattended on a patrol car outside a busy downtown area on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Nick Gonzalez)

SEATTLE (AP) — A Seattle police spokesman says the department is embarrassed after officers left a police rifle unattended on a patrol car outside a busy downtown area.

Spokesman Sgt. Sean Whitcomb says the department has launched an investigation.

Whitcomb says two people spotted the rifle on the parked car. One flagged down bicycle officers to alert them. The other followed the cruiser as it drove through downtown Seattle and tracked down the driver after the car parked.

The alternative weekly The Stranger first reported the incident, posting a picture that shows the rifle sitting on top of the trunk.

Whitcomb says such rifles are assigned only to officers who have additional training. They're usually kept in the trunk or between the driver and passenger seats.

Fugitive grabs officer’s rifle during fight

A Spokane fugitive was arrested Monday after he knocked over a parking meter with his car while fleeing bail bondsmen, then tried to grab a firearm during a struggle with a Spokane police officer.

Christopher Cleo McCracken, 38, (pictured in 2005) sped away from a parking lot at 907 W. 3rd Ave., Monday afternoon after the bondsmen tried to arrest him on felony warrants, Spokane police said today.

McCracken backed over a parking barrier and a sidewalk, knocking down a parking meter on 3rd Avenue that was left in the middle of the street, police said.

A woman who had a restraining order against McCracken "alluded" to him possibly using a handgun to avoid arrests, so a team of nighttime patrol officers that tracks fugitives and crime trends located him about 5 p.m. near 3500 S. Marshall Road.

Officer Sean Wheeler pursued McCracken as he ran into a wooded area and over a barb wire fence. McCracken grabbed the barrel of the rifle, but Wheeler was able to subdue McCracken and arrest him. In a news release, police emphasized that neither McCracken nor the officers were shot to death.

"This is a prime example of how a possibly deadly encounter resulted in an arrest with relatively minor injuries," Officer Jennifer DeRuwe wrote. "Officers entered the situation knowing McCracken was a danger to the community, possibly armed and had an extensive criminal history related to drug abuse and violence."

FBI: Racist felon had ammo, 5 firearms

A Whitman County man arrested on federal gun charges last month had several guns and a large collection of ammunition when investigators searched his properties, a new indictment alleges.

Jeremiah Daniel “J.D.” Hop, 29, faces two counts of felon in possession of a firearm and a forfeiture charge that demands he give up four rifles, a 12-gauge shotgun, and more than 150 rounds of shotgun shells and other ammunition.

A grand jury indicted him on the new charges this week in U.S. District Court.

Hop was convicted in California of third-degree rape of a child in 2005, a felony that prohibits him from possessing firearms or ammunition.

Hop was arrested during an FBI investigation April 20 for allegedly possessing an Izhmash 12-gauge semi-automatic shotgun on March 25.

His brother, Michael Hop, said he was set up by an FBI informant who supplied the shotgun after suggesting they go shooting.

Hop has bragged online about being involved with racist taco-truck protests in Kootenai County. He remains in custody without bail at the Spokane County Jail.