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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper
Tuesday, December 11, 2018  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Stories tagged: science


UPDATED: Sat., Dec. 8, 2018, 3:50 p.m.

Former University of Idaho staff recalls project related to Bush surgery

Twenty-nine years ago, instructional media services researchers at the University of Idaho received an eerie phone call.


Seattle woman dies after contracting rare form of brain-eating amoeba

When a 69-year-old Seattle woman had a seizure earlier this year, doctors at Swedish Medical Center thought she may have had a brain tumor. However during surgery, they discovered it …


Ask Dr. Universe: Chocolate bars a British innovation

In 1847, Joseph Fry figured out how to use these different ingredients to create a chocolate paste that he could mold into a rectangle. He produced the world’s first chocolate …


UPDATED: Wed., Nov. 28, 2018, 9:32 p.m.

WSU scientist: Serious questions for scientist who claims to have gene-edited embryos

Chinese scientist He Jiankui received backlash in the scientific community when he announced the birth of twin girls whose genes he had edited. WSU scientist Lisette Maddison said his research …


Ask Dr. Universe: What makes a pepper hot?

Peppers come in colors like orange, green, yellow, and red, and have different amounts of spiciness. They can be dried into flakes, ground into powder, or made into a fiery …


A look at the science used to find mail-bomb suspect

A 56-year-old Florida man was charged Friday in the nationwide mail-bomb scare targeting prominent Democrats. Experts had predicted that forensic evidence left behind by the bomb maker would help law …


Shawn Vestal: As federal government stalls, Spokane takes its place among localized climate actors

When the City Council overrode the mayor’s veto of new climate change standards for the city, it put Spokane into the right zone.


Skagit Regional Health to offer robotic-assisted surgery

Using two tiny mechanical claws, community members tested out Skagit Regional Health’s new robotic surgery system by unwrapping Starburst candies and moving around mini-rubber rings.


UPDATED: Sun., Aug. 19, 2018, 1:56 p.m.

Science says: ‘The warmer it is, the more fire we see’

The years with the most acres burned by wildfires have some of the hottest temperatures, an Associated Press analysis of fire and weather data found. As human-caused climate change has …


Ask Dr. Universe: Did dinosaurs actually roar?

Mammals such as lions and bears roar. But it’s likely that dinosaurs, which were not mammals, had other ways of communicating.


Ask Dr. Universe: Frisson’s cause remains unknown

It turns out that the experience of getting chills when we listen to music actually has a scientific name: frisson. That’s what I found out when I met up with …


Mars making a brilliant pass near Earth this week

Look to the south or southeast sky after dark during the next week or so and you will see the brightly beaming, rust-colored planet Mars.


EPA proposal to limit science studies draws opposition

Democratic lawmakers joined scores of scientists, health providers, environmental officials and activists Tuesday in denouncing an industry-backed proposal that could limit dramatically the scientific studies the Environmental Protection Agency considers …


Late-life high blood pressure may harm the brain, study says

Decades ago, hundreds of nuns and priests made an extraordinary decision: They agreed to donate their brains upon death to science, hoping to help solve mysteries about Alzheimer’s and other …


Ask Dr. Universe: What happens when we sleepwalk?

WSU sleep researcher Hans Van Dongen and his team observe lots of different sleep behaviors at the Sleep and Performance Research Center. He said there are really two main types …


Ask Dr. Universe: Why do lizards lose their tails?

The main reason a lizard loses its tail is to defend itself. When a lizard detaches its tail, the tail whips around and wiggles on the ground.


UPDATED: Wed., June 20, 2018, 10:24 p.m.

Spark Central nonprofit receives $100,000 grant

The Washington Women’s Foundation gave a grant of $100,000 to Spark Central, a Spokane nonprofit, on Wednesday. The money will go toward teaching innovative technologies like programming, robotics and media …


Meat 2.0? Clean meat? Spat shows the power of food wording

If meat is grown in a lab without slaughtering animals, what should it be called? That question has yet to be decided by regulators, but for the moment, it’s pitting …


Ask Dr. Universe: Why do stink bugs stink?

Stink bugs use smell as a defense against predators.


Spiders can float in the air, and scientists just figured out how they lift off

Records of spider ballooning go back centuries. But scientist have struggled to understand how the arachnids generate lift. One physicist proposed that they use electrostatic forces to take to the …


WSU research off to space

Two remote-manned laboratories – expected to aid local research – are destined for the International Space Station and will launch into orbit Sunday.


A scientist calculated the ludicrous strength of Marvel villain Thanos

Based on a recent “whimsical by design” analysis, Northeastern University engineering professor Steven Cranford calculated that Thanos is powerful enough to dead lift the RMS Titanic.


Ask Dr. Universe: Why do worms come out when it rains?

Worms come to the surface to move around, but exactly why they do it or where they are headed remains a bit of a mystery. Still, scientists have some interesting …


Ask Dr. Universe: Clothing offers its own recycling challenges

WSU researcher Hang Liu imagines a different future for our used clothes. In her lab, she and her team are coming up with creative ways to recycle cotton into a …


UPDATED: Fri., April 27, 2018, 4:30 p.m.

The science behind ‘the munchies’: WSU researcher aims to help cancer, anorexia patients with pot

Jon Davis is “hotboxing” rats for a purpose: to figure out why people who smoke marijuana experience hunger. The research, which Davis hopes to publish soon, is just part of …


UPDATED: Fri., April 20, 2018, 11:55 a.m.

N. Atlantic right whales will be extinct in 25 years, scientists say – unless we act now to save them

For years, spring has signaled the return of North Atlantic right whales – one of Earth’s most endangered species – to Cape Cod Bay. But lately the imperiled animals have …


Ask Dr. Universe: What happens to our trash?

The average human who lives in the U.S. creates about 4.83 pounds of trash each day. Many people don’t really see much of it, though.


A battle of cosmic proportions: WSU, biotech firm sue each other over new apple variety

With millions of trees already planted across the state, the outcomes of the dueling lawsuits seem unlikely to affect consumer availability of the Cosmic Crisp, a flavor-packed hybrid between the …


WSU researchers look to fish for insight on human skull development

Fish research at Washington State University could lead to advances for human health by increasing the knowledge of some developmental disorders that cause facial deformities.


Ask Dr. Universe: Where did the first nerves come from?

While the human body has many parts made up of lots cells, some living things are actually just one little cell – an amoeba or a bacteria, for example.