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Saturday’s highlights

Michele Nelson of SCRAPS checks a stray for an identification chip. SCRAPS and other area animal welfare groups will hold a pet adoption event Friday and March 31. SR photo/Jesse Tinsley

Goodness, what happened to the warm weather and sunshine we had yesterday? It's a dull and rainy Monday out there, the perfect time to catch up on anything you missed in Saturday's Valley Voice. The Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service is heading up a huge free pet adoption event this weekend. Organizers hope to find new homes for more than 200 pets.

Reporter Lisa Leinberger talked to members of the Central Valley High School Knowledge Bowl team, who apparently credit their success to their mascot, a monkey carved from a coconut named Mojo. It seems to be working; the team won the recent state competition on Marysville, Wash.

The Spokane Valley City Council had some discussions last week on sidewalk projects as part of the Safe Routes to School program. The council also talked about the city's new pavement managemet program.

This isn't in the Valley, but if you are a fan of Southern cooking and/or the South Perry neighborhood, you will want to check out Pia Hallenberg's story on a new restaurant opening there at the end of May or in early June. Called Casper Fry, the restaurant will be run by the same people behind Madeleine's. 

Animal control, property on agenda

There are a couple of interesting items on the Spokane Valley City Council agenda for tonight. Spokane County Commissioner Todd Mielke is expected to be there to present information on a new regional animal control concept and the council is also scheduled to discuss the possible acquisition of property on East Sprague across from the old University City Mall. The police chief will also be there to discuss charitable solicitations in public right of way. The meeting starts at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague, if any of those topics interest you.

Today’s highlights

Teacher Robbie Robinson, second from left, stands in a greenhouse with Harmony High School students, from left, Satieva Ankey, Josh Armstrong, Chris Kinyon, Cody Buchanan and Franki Turner. SR pohto/Dan Pelle

We have a ton of good stuff to highlight in today's Valley Voice, so much that I'm not sure I can include it all without making this the mother of all blog posts. So, here we go. Spokane County is looking at a building on East Trent as a possible home for a new regional animal shelter, but first the county commissioners have to convince Spokane and Spokane Valley to go along with the plan and open their pocketbooks to pay for it.

Reporter Lisa Leinberger stopped in at Harmony High School to look at a new product the students are making and selling called Harmony Hot Peppers. It's a mix of dried, ground hot peppers that I hear really clears your sinuses. The students built their own greenhouse to grow the peppers for the mix.

The Spokane Valley City Council spent some time Tuesday with the planning commission and a pair of Seattle land use attorneys to discuss the city's Shoreline Master Program, which has to be updated by the end of 2013. The Liberty Lake City Council heard a request for more money from the Liberty Lake Library to hire staff, but spent a lot of time discussing where the money might come from.

Also in Liberty Lake, police have identified two suspects in a recent string of vehicle prowls, but no arrests have been made yet. There's a partial list of possible stolen property included with the story.

If you are looking for a chuckle (and a clever headline), check out correspondent Cindy Hval's story on the celebration of her cats' birthdays. The cat pictured with the story looks less than thrilled about his birthday attire.

Saturday’s highlights

“He scored very high on his behavioral test,” said Jackie Bell, development coordinator for SCRAPS, about Astro, the terrier mix at the facility in Spokane Valley on Tuesday. SR photo/Kathy Plonka

It feels a little odd to be at work on a Monday after the last couple of weeks, but here we are for the highlights from Saturday's Valley Voice. (And we have next Monday off, too. Cool.) The Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS) is feeling its way forward after a new regional shelter failed at the ballot box in November. A new location is still the plan, but where and when that might happen is yet to be determined.

I checked in with Advent Lutheran Church, which was created by the combination of Good Shepherd Lutheran and Christ Lutheran in May. The new church seems to be doing well as members consider what they want their church to be.

Correspondent Val Putnam attended the Millwood City Council meeting, where new council members were sworn in and a water plan was discussed. Correspondent Jennifer LaRue interviewed a youg rapper, Aubrey Major of West Valley High School. She writes her own songs and has already performed some concerts.

In aftermath of animal control tax defeat, Spokane signs back up with SpokAnimal

The above map shows the outcome of Spokane County Proposition 1, which was rejected overwhelmingly in the November election. (Map by Jim Camden.)

The rejection county voters gave last month to a tax for a new animal shelter led the Spokane City Council on Monday to stick with SpokAnimal C.A.R.E.

 

The council voted unanimously to approve a two-year contract to pay the nonprofit group about $753,000 a year to continue to handle animal control services within city limits. The contract is an increase of about 3.4 percent from the amount the city will pay the group in 2011. SpokAnimal will continue to return a portion of dog and cat license fees to the city, about $200,000 each year.

Loves long walks on the beach and belly rubs

I couldn't help myself; I just had to post a picture of this week's featured animal. Bolt has been at the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service shelter for a few weeks now. He's a 2-year-old neutered Lab mix. Shelter staff say he's good on a leash, likes to go for walks and loves belly rubs. He appears to get along with both cats and dogs. He does have a non-contagious skin condition that will need treatment.

If you are interested in adopting Bolt, his identification number is 4517. The adoption fee for dogs is $82.04, which includes a vet check, license, microchip, vaccinations and either spaying or neutering. You can stop by to visit Bolt at 2421 N. Flora Road or call (509) 477-2532 for more information. Photo courtesy of SCRAPS.

Dogs and the Fair don’t mix

You might think people would realize that they shouldn't stop by the Spokane Interstate Fair in this heat and leave their dogs locked in the car, but you would be wrong. Apparently the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service found two dogs locked in a car at the Fair that was 144 degrees inside on Sunday. The SCRAPS officer was just about ready to remove the dogs from the car when the owners came back and said that they had only been gone for an hour.

If that seems okay to you, go do an experiment. Find a nice, hot parking lot. Turn off the car and close the windows. Sit there. You will soon realize that it only takes a few minutes for it to become unbearable.

In this case the dogs survived and their owners were cited for confinement in an unsafe manner. But in these hot temperatures pets can quickly die in overheated cars, even if you crack the windows a bit. Please take care of your pets.

Check out who is happy today

The featured dog up for adoption this week at the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service is all gangly legs and big doggy grin. Millie, a 9-month-old Pit Bull mix, is really still just a pup. Shelter staff says that she is willing to learn, however. She already knows "sit," loves to play with tennis balls and likes to take a dip in the kiddie pool. She tested well with both cats and dogs. Millie has been at SCRAPS since July 2 and would love a good home.

If you are interested in adopting Millie, her identification number is 3042. The adoption fee for dogs is $82.04, which includes a vet check, license, microchip, vaccinations and either spaying or neutering. You can stop by to visit Millie at 2421 N. Flora Road or call (509) 477-2532 for more information. Photo courtesy of SCRAPS.

You ain’t nothing but a hound dog

A sunny Friday morning is a good time to quote Elvis, don't you think? And it is a hound dog mix that is the featured adoptable dog of the week at the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service. As an added bonus, his name is Watson. How fun would it be to poke your head out your back door and say "Watson, I need you!" According to shelter staff, Watson walks well on a leash, knows "sit" and gets along well with cats and dogs. He is reportedly fond of having his ears rubbed and playing on the grass.

If you are interested in adopting Watson, his identification number is 2517. The adoption fee for dogs is $82.04, which includes a vet check, license, microchip, vaccinations and either spaying or neutering. You can stop by to visit Watson at 2421 N. Flora Road or call (509) 477-2532 for more information. Photo courtesy of SCRAPS.

A spring blossom

Probably everyone can tell by now that I'm a sucker for a cute critter. The Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service shelter has another cute one up for adoption this week. Her name is Blossom and she's about two years old and is a Pointer mix. Shelter staff say she's a little shy, but she walks well on the leash and appears to get along well with both cats and dogs. She sounds like a keeper for someone looking for a fairly easygoing companion.

If you are interested in adopting Blossom, her identification number is 2044. The adoption fee for dogs is $82.04, which includes a vet check, license, microchip, vaccinations and either spaying or neutering. You can stop by to visit Blossom at 2421 N. Flora Road or call (509) 477-2532 for more information.

A canine companion

The staff at the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service shelter describe Cody as a "fun-loving, affectionate canine companion," but in his picture he looks almost regal. Or maybe it's just me. Cody is this week's featured pet looking for a new  home. The shepherd mix gets along well with cats and dogs and knows how to sit.

If you are interested in adopting Cody, his identification number is 1809. The adoption fee for dogs is $82.04, which includes a vet check, license, microchip, vaccinations and either spaying or neutering. You can stop by to visit Cody at 2421 N. Flora Road or call (509) 477-2532 for more information.

Let’s play!

This pup looks so happy and friendly; I swear he is smiling. Bean is a male pit bull mix up for adoption this week at the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service shelter. The staff says he could use a couple of their free training classes to learn to walk on a leash better, but he is house trained and knows "sit" and likes to play ball. He appears to get along with with other dogs but would prefer a home without cats.

If you are interested in adopting Bean, his identification number is 1742. The adoption fee for dogs is $82.04, which includes a vet check, license, microchip, vaccinations and either spaying or neutering. You can stop by to visit Bean at 2421 N. Flora Road or call (509) 477-2532 for more information. Photo courtesy of SCRAPS.

Gentleman seeks food bowl, comfy bed

The featured pet this week from the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service looks like the ideal dog for someone who is looking for a laid-back, easy going pet. Alder is described by shelter staff as a "calm, mature gentleman." He's a senior dog who is mellow and appears to get along well with cats and other dogs. He has already been neutered, so he can be taken home right away.

If you are interested in adopting Alder, his identification number is 1478. The adoption fee for dogs is $82.04, which includes a vet check, license, microchip, vaccinations and either spaying or neutering. You can stop by to visit Alder at 2421 N. Flora Road or call (509) 477-2532 for more information. Photo courtesy of SCRAPS.

Fetch, girl, fetch!

This shepherd mix looks like she would love a nice game of fetch with that ball, and maybe you are the one to give it to her. Haley is up for adoption at the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service. Shelter staff estimate she's between one and two years old. She likes to play and apparently likes to romp in water. She needs a lot of exercise and would fit right in with an active family.

Haley would prefer a home without cats and she should be leashed when being introduced to other dogs, the shelter staff says. If you are intersted in adopting her, her identification number is 0766. The adoption fee for dogs is $82.04, which includes a vet check, license, microchip, vaccinations and either spaying or neutering. You can stop by to visit Haley at 2421 N. Flora Road or call (509) 477-2532 for more information. Photo courtesy of SCRAPS.

Police: Dog abuser beat boy, too

A Spokane Valley man already accused of abusing his dog has been charged with felony assault against a child.

Jeffrey S. Brown, 40, is accused of beating his 4-year-old stepson at the home they shared with Brown's wife and the couple's 18-month old son at 14819 E. Fourth Ave.

Brown remains in Spokane County Jail on $50,000 bond after appearing before Superior Court Judge Greg Sypolt today on one count of second-degree assault of a child. That's in addition to $10,000 bond already imposed for a first-degree animal cruelty charge

According to court documents, the victim's mother noticed unusual bruising on the boy Dec. 27 and took him to a hospital, then fled Spokane with her children "in cooperation with Child Protective Services."

Brown was arrested in February after animal protection officers found his 1-year-old brown dog, Gizmoto, with a broken femur sustained during months of abuse.

Brown released ownership of the dog to SCRAPS, and the organization paid for the dog to be examined. SCRAPS director Nancy Hill said Wednesday that the veterinarian took the dog in but said she wasn't sure if it had been adopted yet.

In an interview with a sheriff's detective, Brown initially denied hurting the boy but then said he'd been too forceful on several occasions and needed counseling to control his temper.

It’s Barney time

Meet Barney, the newest cute creature featured for adoption from the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service. He is about a year old and gets along well with other dogs as well as cats. Since he's young, he could use a bit more training, which SCRAPS will provide for free. He's a handsome looking fellow and he's got perfect petting fur.

If you would like to adopt Barney, ask for him by identification number 0810. The adoption fee for dogs is $82.04, which includes a vet check, license, microchip, vaccinations and either spaying or neutering (although Barney is already neutered). You can stop by to visit Barney at 2421 N. Flora Road or call (509) 477-2532 for more information. Photo courtesy of SCRAPS.

Man jailed after abused dog seized

A Spokane Valley man is in jail after animal control officers say they found his dog whimpering in pain from months of abuse.

Jeffrey S. Brown, 40, faces a first-degree animal cruelty charge after neighbors called the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service and said Brown beat and kicked the dog at his home at 14819 E. 4th Ave.

Brown told investigators that he’d adopted the 1-year-old brown dog, Gizmoto, last June and said he’d recently taken it to a veterinarian, but the vet told police he hadn’t seen Brown.

Brown released ownership of the dog to SCRAPS on Jan. 13, and the organization paid for the dog to be examined. The dog had a broken femur that was about three or four weeks old but had been re-injured. The vet said the dog was in severe pain and likely would require surgery, according to court documents.

Brown’s wife, Jennifer Brown, told police she’d left the dog with her husband after Child Protective Services took their four-year-old son because of abuse.

Brown remains in jail on $10,000 bond after appearing before Superior Court Judge Linda Tompkins on Friday.

Meet Tennessee, a happy hound

This week's Feature Creature is a happy looking hound called Tennessee. Staff at the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service estimate he is between one and two years old. He likes to play, walks well on the leash and appears to be house trained. He is overly enthusiastic when meeting other animals, however, so introductions should take place when he's leashed.

If you would like to adopt Tennessee, ask for him by identification number 0698. The adoption fee for dogs is $82.04, which includes a vet check, license, microchip, vaccinations and either spaying or neutering. You can stop by to visit the friendly hound at 2421 N. Flora Road or call (509) 477-2532 for more information. Photo courtesy of SCRAPS.

Furry hitchhiker on her way home

A truck driver who arrived at the Spokane Valley Target warehouse this week with a shipment from Albany, Ore., didn't realize he had an unauthorized passenger in the back. When he opened the door to unload, a cat dashed out and hid from workers, who called SCRAPS for help.

The cat was caught and taken to SCRAPS, which contacted the Albany Herald in the hopes of finding the owner, according to SCRAPS press release. Against all odds the owner was located and today the cat is leaving town for the trip back to Albany. This time, she gets to ride in front. Photo courtesy of SCRAPS.

Coming on Saturday

Patricia Simonet hugs Adam the dog at Spokane Regional Animal Protection Services (SCRAPS) on , December 6, 2005. SR photo/Holly Pickett

We've got a mixture of fun and sadness coming your way in the Saturday Valley Voice. Animal lovers are mourning the loss of Patricia Simonet, an animal behaviorist who worked at SCRAPS and was known for discovering dog laughter. She died of cancer last month and a public memorial service is set for Jan. 22 at 1 p.m. at the Spokane Buddhist Temple.

Reporter Lisa Leinberger will take a look at just what teenagers are thinking when they leave the house in snowy, bitter weather with no coats and wildly inappropriate clothing or footwear. I saw a teenager wearing shorts last week on a day when the temperature was struggling to top 10 degrees. Brrrr!

The Liberty Lake crime blotter should make an appearance after being held over from Thursday. The garage burglar may be back in town, so luck up tight. Also, Valley Meals on Wheels will begin serving lunch in Otis Orchards next week.


  

Today’s highlights

Kenai  is escorted by SCRAPS volunteer coordinator Francine Moniz to a kennel. Chances are good that Kenai will find her way home. She had both SpokAnimal and personal ID tags with a phone number, as well as a microchip. SR phot/J. Bart Rayniak

In today's Valley Voice, the Spokane Country Regional Animal Protection Service will lose its after  hours drop off room in January. People have been dropping off animals from other counties and abandoning pets there. The agency is also cramped for space and needs the room.

SCORE, a non-profit agency that helps local businesses, helped the owners of a Liberty Lake pet boutique open their doors. Also, former Spokane Valley city councilman Dick Denenny will be given the 2010 Citizen of the Year award in January by the Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce.

There is also some Valley news in the main paper today. Reporter Bert Caldwell writes that Greenstone Development Co. and its owner, Jim Frank, have been fined by the Department of Ecology for removing trees from a protected shoreline area at Liberty Lake. Frank is disputing the fine.

Coming Thursday

This cat was left at the SCRAPS after hours drop off sometime between 5:30 pm, Mon., Dec. 20, and 7:30 am Tuesday Dec. 21, 2010 with no paper work. So far 1,969 cats and dogs have been left at the receiving room, with 886 undocumented. SR photo/J. Bart Rayniak 

Despite the short holiday week we've managed to put together yet another informative Valley Voice for Thursday. The Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS) will be losing its after hours drop off room, the only one in the region, sometime in January. The intent was to allow people a place to bring strays found on the street, but people have been using it to drop off animals found in other counties and pets who are no longer wanted.

There will be a preview of the Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce awards gala in January, where former Spokane Valley city councilman Dick Denenny will receive the 2010 Harry E. Nelson Citizen of the Year award. A Liberty Lake pet boutique recently opened after its owners took advantage of the classes and mentoring offered by SCORE, a non-profit that assists local businesses.

Liberty Lake council tonight

I nearly forgot to mention the Liberty Lake City Council meeting tonight at 7 p.m. at City Hall, 22710 E. Country Vista Drive. It’s the last meeting of the year (unless another special meeting is scheduled), so the council must approve the 2011 budget. It looks like things won’t be as dire as once thought; the city discovered last week that they have more income than anticipated.

The meeting will also include a discussion of the 2011 animal control contract with SCRAPS and the presentation of Liberty Lake Police Department awards.

A window to the soul

Don’t these sad eyes just beg you to take this dog home? Rex is up for adoption at the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service and would love to have a new home for Christmas. He’s already been neutered and is about three or four years old. The shelter staff describe the St. Bernard mix as a “gentle giant” and say he is good with children. In this picture his white body blends into the snow in the background, but the eyes say it all.

When you head out to 2421 N. Flora Road to bring Rex home with you, he is known as number 6865. The adoption fee for dogs is $82.04 and includes a vet visit, license, spaying or neutering, vaccinations and a microchip. The photo is courtesey of SCRAPS.

Saturday’s highlights

SCRAPS animal protection assistant Rachel Sayer sits with a dog that was found Nov. 19 and brought into the shelter by a citizen. The dog had no microchip, no license and no ID on its collar.

There was a lot to read in Saturday’s Valley Voice, so here’s a chance to check out some of the stories in case you missed them.The Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service is hoping that more people will license their pets to fund programs, but a check of records from the 1920’s show that getting people to pay is not a new problem.

Liberty Lake has had an ongoing problem with garage burglaries and vehicle prowlings, aided and abetted by residents’ habit of leaving their garages and cars unlocked. The police chief says that habit has made Liberty Lake an “easy target” and pleads with people to lock up.

A 15-year-old West Valley student is following in his father’s footsteps. He is already a successful race car driver even though he isn’t old enought to get his driver’s license. A local magician is the new manager of Players and Spectators and is hoping to create a little magic to bring people in the doors. Some teachers at University Elementary are using technology to enhance their lessons by using grant money to purchase Smart Boards (essentially large touch screens) for the classroom.

Coming on Saturday

We’ve got a great lineup of stories coming in the Saturday Valley Voice that you can peruse while having a turkey omelet or turkey sandwich. The struggle of the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service to get pet owners to license their pets is not a new one, proven by the “dog tax” rolls from the 1920’s found in a warehouse several years ago.

A 15-year-old West Valley student is having a successful career as a race car driver even though he doesn’t have his driver’s license yet. A local magician is hoping to create some magic as the new manager of Players and Spectators. The garage buglary/car prowling crime spree is continuing in Liberty Lake. There were nine new thefts reported last week. Residents are in the habit of leaving their garages and cars unlocked, which is frustrating efforts by Liberty Lake Police to stem the surge in thefts.

I’ll post some links to stories next week, or you can browse them yourself on Saturday here.

4 misdemeanors for alleged cat hoarder

A Spokane Valley homeowner whose 31 cats were seized last week has been charged with four misdemeanors. 

Julianna O. Bauer (left, in 2009) “was basically overwhelmed” by the situation and wants to cooperate with animal protection officers, said Nancy Hill, director of the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service.

Bauer contacted SCRAPS on Saturday and relinquished ownership of the felines, which were seized Sept. 15 from Bauer’s home at 4616 N. Larch Road. Officers described the home as “horrific.” Bauer said she was living there but sleeping in her car because of the mess, Hill said.

“She said basically that she was overwhelmed,” Hill said. “She wanted to cooperate to resolve this.”

Bauer’s cats, who had no major long-term health problems, are available for adoption, along with hundreds of other cats.

Forty-five cats were adopted last week at discount prices, but 118 were brought in, prompting SCRAPS to continue the special this week.

Today through Saturday, adoption fees are $25 cor one cat and $40 for two cats, which includes spaying or neutering, vaccines, microchips and licenses.

SCRAPS issued misdemeanor citations to Bauer for second-degree animal cruelty, one count of confinement in an unsafe manner and one count of operating an unlawful kennel.

Her case is a smaller-scale version of a hoarding case in west Spokane in summer 2008 that drew felony animal cruelty charges.

In the 2008 case, the suspect’s lawyer said the fumes inside her home may have affected her ability to reason; animal experts said her case showed how cat advocates can quickly transform into cat hoarders because of the region’s animal overpopulation problem.

Hot Cars Jeoparize Pets Inside

Even with the windows cracked, the temperature of the leather seat inside the Mercedes-Benz parked in the Value Village parking lot on East Sprague on Saturday afternoon climbed to more than 140 degrees. Down on the floor, where Olive, a Yorkshire terrier, was huddled beneath the foot pedals, an infrared gun gauged the temperature at a cooler 109 degrees. “It’s literally like cooking,” said Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Services Officer Ashley Brown, who was dispatched to rescue the dog. It’s a scene that’s all too familiar for animal control officers/Sara Leaming, SR. More here.

  • Cutlines: Animal Control Officer Ashley Brown climbs onto a car to try and unlock it through the sunroof to free a dog left in the car on a hot day Saturday along Sprague in Spokane Valley. (SR photo: Jesse Tinsley)

Question: Would you break a vehicle window to save an animal left inside?

Animal Cops Busy w/Dogs In Cars

SCRAPS Animal Protection Officers have been extremely busy today responding to numerous calls about pets left in vehicles. One of these calls was when a customer spotted two dogs in a vehicle in the Spokane Valley Costco parking lot and they called SCRAPS. SCRAPS Animal Protection Officer Ashley Brown responded and when she arrived at the vehicle she could see two dogs lying in the hot vehicle clearly in distress. She proceeded to get the vehicle unlocked as the windows were slightly cracked and rescued the dogs. The temperature inside the car was 126 degrees. Officer Brown gave the dogs immediate first aid and rushed them to emergency veterinary care/KHQ. More here.

Question: Should you always call animal control, if you see a dog left in a vehicle?

Is someone targeting Spokane dogs?

Abby collapsed near the back steps, convulsing before her owner took her inside, where she died.

Her companion, Snoopy, died shortly after, both victims of what animal control officials suspect is a targeted assault using poisoned meatballs to kill Spokane’s best friends.

The attack on Abby and Snoopy took place in the 3300 block of East 55th Street. Another dog living near Regal Street and the Palouse Highway died Friday.

Then on Monday, a homeowner near 36th Street and Grand Boulevard found a suspicious meatball similar to those found Friday. Officials suspect a connection but haven’t determined one.The meat will be sent to Washington State University for testing.

Meanwhile, dog owners are urged to inspect their yards and keep their pets indoors, and the Humane Society of the United States is offering a reward of up to $2,500 for information that leads to an arrest. In each case, officials said, the targeted properties have dog houses, signs or other indications that dogs live there.

“It looks to me as though somebody is just driving around and wherever they see evidence of a dog living there, they toss those meatballs out,” said Gail Mackie, executive director of SpokAnimal. “It doesn’t make a difference where you live, you’re not immune.”

The people responsible for the tainted meatballs face charges of first-degree animal cruelty.

Nancy Hill, director of the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service, described the substance as “a very fast-acting, horrible-death kind of poison.”

The meatballs “are very attractive, and they’re very lethal,” she said. “A dog can eat a meatball before you can even blink an eye.”

The woman who found the meat in her front yard on Monday “for some miraculous reason” had only let her dogs in the backyard that morning, Hill said.

“She was extremely upset knowing those were sitting in the area,” Hill said.

Abby (top right) and Snoopy (top left) lived with 21-year-old David Cheney and his family.

Cheney found the dogs early Friday after they ate what officials believe are the same type of meatballs found earlier that day near Regal Street and the Palouse Highway.

A SCRAPS investigator found several suspicious meatballs in Cheney’s neighbor’s yard.

“I spent Friday and Saturday burying both dogs,” Cheney said.

Both are buried in the backyard under large wooden crosses. Snoopy’s grave is below a tree he liked to lie under on sunny days.

The Cheneys brought the dogs with them from Florida when they moved to Spokane in 2002.

Cheney said he has no idea who would want to hurt them or why.

“The cops have better get ahold of him before I do,” Cheney said. “I’ll go to prison over it.”