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Friday, April 19, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Stories tagged: spokane history


Then and Now: The Lang Building

The Lang Building was erected on Washington Street in 1891. Most of the downtown buildings in that era were built for ground floor retail space, with a hotel or residence …


UPDATED: Wed., April 10, 2019, 4:42 p.m.

Spokane Valley Heritage Museum exhibit will celebrate legacy of Spokane aviation hero Nick Mamer

The Spokane Valley Heritage Museum is planning a notable exhibit in July featuring documents and photos from the late Spokane aviator Nick Mamer.


Then and Now: Maple Street Bridge

The Maple Street Bridge, which opened to traffic on July 1, 1958, is 1,716 feet long, towering 125 feet above the Spokane River, and its road surface is 50 feet …


UPDATED: Mon., March 25, 2019, 6:28 a.m.

Then and Now: Single-room occupancy hotels rose to fill Spokane’s growth needs

Single-room occupancy hotels accommodated downtown Spokane’s booming early 1900s, including the Albany, Regal and Stanford hotels. Rooms had a bed, sink, wardrobe and little else.


Then and Now: The Palace and J.C. Penney

The old Palace building got a complete makeover in mid-century style, for the incoming J.C. Penney store.


Then and Now: Ford pavilion at Expo ’74

The first corporate exhibitor to sign on for Expo ’74 was Ford Motor Co. The commitment was made in January of 1973, just 17 months before the opening ceremonies in …


Then and Now: George Washington Carver USO Club

Rosa D. Malone arrived in Spokane as a Works Progress Administration supervisor and founded the Booker T. Washington Community Center in the basement of Calvary Baptist Church in 1937.


UPDATED: Mon., Dec. 10, 2018, 10:05 a.m.

Then and Now: Buchanan Chevrolet

R. G. “Buck” Buchanan, born in 1901 and raised on a cattle ranch in New Mexico, started in the car business in 1918 as a driving instructor in Missoula, Montana, …


Then and Now: Spokane’s rocky landscape

When Spokane city father James Glover arrived in 1874, science had yet to explain the rocky buttes and basins of Eastern Washington or the other varied landscapes of the Washington …


Then and Now: Blalock Building

John B. Blalock, born 1856 in Sevier County, Tennessee, was one of Spokane Falls’ early settlers, arriving in 1879, after stops in Oregon and Walla Walla.


Then and Now: Union Station

Historian Robert Hyslop, in his book “Spokane Building Blocks,” explains why Spokane’s Union Station, shown under construction in 1913, was called a station and not a depot. There had already …


Then and Now: J.J. Newberry store

In the late 1800s, America entrepreneurs have created a revolution in retail business by appealing to the thriftiness of the shopper and offering a wide variety of merchandise to save …


Then and Now: 1972 International House of Pancakes

Thing were changing quickly in the early 1970s in Spokane. Civic leaders were planning for Expo ’74, and businesses were changing the look of downtown Spokane. On the corner of …


Then and Now: Spokane’s first auto mechanic

George Ethan Bartoo was one Spokane’s first mechanics and car dealers. As a young man in the 1880s in Indiana, he and a friend built a simple steam-powered cart which …


Then and Now: End of the streetcar era

On December 17, 1886, J.J. Browne, Henry C. Marshall and A.J. Ross incorporated the Spokane Street Railway company to build the rails and operate streetcars. The first priority was to …


Then and Now: 915 and 919 W. First Ave.

Two buildings, both built in 1906, on First Ave. in Spokane have been important places of business to both farmers and urban residents.


Then and Now: Saad Shoe Repair

In 1909, 15-year-old Eli Saad arrived nearly penniless in Spokane. His older brothers Paul and John had started the Saad Bros. Shoe Repair, Pool Room and Cigars in 1906, and …


Then and Now: McGoldrick Lumber

James P. McGoldrick, born in 1859, started in the timber business in Minnesota. Seeing that most of the lumber he sold came from the Northwest, he moved to Spokane in …


Then and Now: Spokane Buddhist Temple

Spokane Buddhist Temple started 1945 with a rented apartment and a group of six dedicated Buddhists.


Then and Now: Spokane’s Tallest Buildings

Since James Glover rode up to the Spokane Falls in 1873 and made a deal to buy out the two squatters on the land around the falls, there has been …


Then and Now: Agnes McDonald and the electric car

Agnes McDonald (1865-1961) was one of Spokane’s most colorful characters. She was only 35 when her husband, a wealthy mining investor, died, leaving her with two sons to raise. His …


Then and Now: Spokane in 1910

1910 was a watershed year for Spokane.


Then and Now: Temple Court building

Brothers Albert P. and William M. Wolverton, ages 25 and 31, arrived in the frontier town of Spokane Falls in 1880 and paid $350 for a lot on the northeast …


Then and Now: The steel Monroe Street Bridge, 1892-1909

The first Monroe Street bridge, built by Spokane Cable Railway and partners, cost $42,000 and opened in 1889. Two other iterations followed, the last being the concrete bridge we see …


Then and Now: Cannon Mansion

Anthony McCue Cannon, born in 1837 in Illinois, was a restless young man in search of business ideas. He made and lost fortunes in Kansas City, Los Angeles, and Portland, …


Then and Now: Pilot Nick Mamer

Nick Mamer, born in 1898, learned to fly at 18 in San Diego and served in France in the U.S. Army Air Service during WWI. He shot down three enemy …


Then and Now: Coeur d’Alene Hotel

A partnership between “Dutch” Jake and Harry Baer led to the construction of a legendary hotel in the early 1900s.


Then and Now: The Harlem Club

Ernest James “Jim” Brown, born around 1891 in Tennessee, arrived in Spokane in the mid-1920s as the chauffeur for H.D. Lee, the businessman responsible for Lee overalls. By the early …


Then and Now: Sacred Heart School of Nursing

In the late 1890s, Spokane’s three hospitals – Deaconess, Sacred Heart and St. Luke’s – had a shortage of trained nurses.


Then and Now: Umatilla Hotel

The Umatilla Hotel, on the southeast corner of Main and Bernard, survived the 1889 fire, which stopped at Washington St., but couldn’t avoid it 55 years later.