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Today’s highlights

Joel Elgee, left, and paramedic Nick Muzik look at baby Leona, who was delivered with Muzik’s help in Liberty Lake Jan. 25. SR photo/Jesse Tinsley

There are some good stories in today's Valley Voice to go with your morning coffee. The feel good story of the day is about the successful birth of a healthy baby girl who was helped into the world by a Spokane Valley Fire Department crew and an AMR abulance crew. This baby wasn't waiting around and firefighters delivered the baby in only a few minutes. The family recently stopped by Station 3 in Liberty Lake to express their gratitude.

Spokane Valley's Public Works Director Neil Kersten takes a trip to Honduras every year to help build schools. He's on the board of directors of the non-profit that does the work, Schools for the Children of the World. The Spokane Valley City Council voted Tuesday to exempt Spokane Valley businesses from a new state law that limited alcohol signs in windows. Two council members voted against the exemption after several citizens testified against it.

The city planning commission met recently and gave their vote of approval to rezoning property west of Conklin and a little south of Broadway to high density residential. Scores of neighbors testified against allowing apartment buildings on land surrounded by single family homes. The planning commission did recommend that the city negotiate a development agreement with the property owner that would provide larger setbacks and restrictions on height and density on some areas of the property. It will be up to the city council to make the final decision.

Reporter Lisa Leinberger spoke to a Spokesman-Review carrier who spotted and put out an early morning fire at the Brass Rail Tavern in Rosalia recently. The property owners are grateful for his help and have promised him a steak dinner.

Light agenda for tonight’s council meeting

There are only a few items on the agenda for tonight's Spokane Valley City Council meeting, but how long the meeting lasts depends on how much discussion there is on those items. The council is scheduled to consider the second and final reading of proposed ordinances to change the city's landscaping rules and remove restrictions on the number and size of signs advertising alcohol.

The alcohol signage ordinance attracted some negative public comments at a previous meeting, so there may be more of the same tonight. The meeting starts at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague. See you there!

Saturday’s highlights

After seven years as superintendent of the West Valley School District, Polly Crowley is stepping down. She visits with Orchard Center Elementary School Principal Travis Peterson on Tuesday in Spokane Valley. SR photo/Dan Pelle

There was a good mix of stories in Saturday's Valley Voice. Reporter Lisa Leinberger topped off the front page with a nice profile on West Valley Superintendent Polly Crowley, who has announced her retirement at the end of the school year.

The issue that is likely to generate some debate was a discussion by the Spokane Valley City Council last week on whether they should ban curbside fundraisers such as Fill the Boot. The city currently gives out permits to local charities to do this once a year, but many groups apparently aren't following the rules and there are safety concerns.

The 2011 numbers are in for the Spokane Valley Fire Department and show an increase in arson fires and a decrease in accidental fires. The number of arson arrests are up as well and the department is proud of it's high solve rate for the criminal fires. Correspondent Valerie Putnam attended the recent Millwood City Council meeting, where they voted to change the regular meeting date and spent a lot of time discussing water rates.

Today’s highlights

Cemetery Director Richard Cesler, far right, reads the names of veterans from Washington who did not receive funeral honors. SR photo/Colin Mulvany

It's Thursday, which means another edition of the Valley Voice has hit porches across Spokane Valley. Reporter Lisa Leinberger has a story today on the monthly Veterans Memorial Tribute Program held at the Eastern Washington State Veterans Cemetery in Medical Lake. The ceremony gives formal honors to veterans who did not receive the honors at their own funerals for whatever reason.

The Spokane Valley City Council spent a fair amount of time Tuesday complaining about a recent story and editorial on a possible conflict of interest due to the close ties some council members have to Jack Pring, the owner of property the city is considering purchasing. After their digression from the agenda, the council decided to move forward with the purchase by preparing a conceptual site plan for the property and negotiating a letter of intent to purchase.

The city recently launched new permit software that has opened up a whole new realm for how employees can track and process permits. There are also plans to open up information to the public by this summer. And if you are looking for something to do this weekend, Lisa has information on the play "Did Someone Say Murder?" being put on by the East Valley High School drama department.

Land deal under scrutiny

The Spokane Valley City Council is in the early stages of exploring a possible joint purchase of property with the Spokane County Library District. The eight acre spot at Sprague and Herald across from the old University City Mall is owned by Jack Pring, who has close ties to six of the seven council members. An attorney from the State Auditor's Office said it is possible to complete the deal without violating conflict of interest laws, but the council will need to proceed carefully and make sure all the proper procedures are followed. Click here to read my story in today's paper.

Today’s highlights

Nick Kane and Bayley Brooks dance at the Coeur d’Alene Eagles Lodge Ballroom early last month. Dance partners only since June, the pair have proved to be a quick study. SR photo/Kathy Plonka

We've got another batch of good stuff for you in today's Valley Voice. Perhaps the most touching story is by correspondent Cindy Hval, who attended a wedding recently at the Orchard Crest Retirement Community in Spokane Valley. Kent Collings, 95, and Lorraine Lanterman, 77, met at the bridge table at the retirement facility and dated for four years before tying the knot.

Rainey Coffin talked to young ballroom dancers Bayley Brooks, 14, and Nicholas Kane, 16. The two are getting ready for the 2012 USA Dance Nationals in Baltimore. The Spokane Valley City Council tackled several different subjects at this week's meeting, including alcohol advertising and lodging tax fund distribution.

The Spokane Valley Fire Department found an additional $312,000 in reserves and a contingency fund to pay for the higher than expected bid to tear down and rebuild Station 6 on the west end of town. The Liberty Lake Police Department has had some success in identifying more vehicle prowl victims and suspects after a recent surge in thefts.  

Lodging tax money up for discussion again

It looks like slow and steady will win the race at tonight's Spokane Valley City Council meeting. There are quite a few things on the agenda, but most are items the council has looked at before. There will be the second reading of an ordinance to amend the 2012 budget and the first reading of proposed ordinances that would chance the city's landscaping regulations and allow businesses to have more signs advertising alcohol.

There is one new item on the agenda that might generate some discussion. There will be a report on the second round of funding recommendations from the Lodging Tax Advisory Committee. There was some consternation earlier when the majority of the committee recommended not giving any funding to Valleyfest and they have made the same recommendation in the second round. Instead they want to give almost all the money available to the Spokane Regional Convention and Visitor's Bureau.

Today’s highlights

Rina Clark, right, a West Valley Outdoor Learning Center raptor volunteer, introduces Ava McLeod to Willie the barn owl, Friday. SR photo/Dan Pelle

We start today look's at the Valley Voice with two great stories by reporter Lisa Leinberger. She visited with an autistic volunteer, Ava McLeod, who works with the birds at the West Valley Outdoor Learning Center. McLeod knows several bird calls now and has handled some of the birds.

Lisa's second story on the Central Valley School District will impact the entire Spokane Valley area. The Central Valley board has agreed to purchase the morner Rite Aid building at Sprague and University to expnd the Skills Center program. The West Valley Contract Based Education currently fills half the building and will remain there. The Skills Center classes offered there would also be open to students in the West Valley, East Valley and Freeman school districts.

The Spokane Valley City Council had another discussion on the gateway sign proposed at Appleway and Thierman as they fine tuned the plan for the site. The Spokane Valley Fire Department is mulling over their options after construction bids for a new Station 6 came in over the estimated cost of $1.3 million. The lowest bid was $1.5 million and others went as high as $1.8 million.

Busy Spokane Valley council meeting tonight

The agenda for the Spokane Valley City Council tonight is quite lengthy, but there are several "housekeeping" city code changes that will hopefully be dealt with quickly. There will be a public hearing on adding several capital projects to the 2012 budget, including a road project on South Evergreen and a gateway sign. Additional agenda items include discussions on the Parks Master Plan and alcohol advertising regulations.

The meeting begins at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague. This is a formal meeting, so there will be time for public comment on items not on the agenda.

Saturday’s highlights

Karen Fournier, left, and Jane Murphy of Hearth Homes stand in the living room of the newest transitional home the group will open in Spokane Valley, Thursday. Hearth Homes runs a series of homes for women with children. Fournier is the group’s executive director, and Murphy is the development director. SR photo/Jesse Tinsley

Saturday's Valley Voice is chock full of news from the area and makes an excellent read over coffee (or lunch). Reporter Lisa Leinberger spoke to the founder of Hearth Homes, Karen Fournier. She runs several homes for homeless women with children and is getting ready for a ribbon cutting on another house.

The Spokane Valley City Council had its annual winter retreat last week and spent hours discussing various issues facing the city. They discussed how to pay for street preservation projects, economic development and the possible acquisition of land in partnership with the Spokane County Library District.

Correspondent Valerie Putnam attended the Millwood City Council meeting where the council discussed the possible need to raise water rates. Last week the Spokane Valley Fire Department managed to put out a chicken coop fire before any of the chickens were hurt.

Today’s highlights

Betsy Blake, Cathy Lobe, center, and Jan Stripes, rear, work on producing homemade placemats for Meals on Wheels at Lobe’s home in northwest Spokane on Feb. 1. SR photo/Dan Pelle

At the top of today's Valley Voice is news that residents along south Evergreen will have their street fully repaved this summer after a new water line is installed underneath it. This week the Spokane Valley City Council approved using city money to repave the road.

Reporter Lisa Leinberger has a report on the Liberty Lake City Council meeting, where council members voted to not change their attendance policy. It was the topic of some discussion last year after a couple of council members had accumulated several absences.

Rainey Coffin has a story on a group of retired home economists who make placemats for the local Meals on Wheels organization. Longtime correspondent and Master Gardener Pat Munts wrote a story on a Spokane Valley couple who are making every effort to make sure a hummingbird survives the winter.

A day with the Spokane Valley city council

The Spokane Valley City Council has a full day of meetings tomorrow and I'll be right there with them, so there won't be any blog posting. First on the schedule is the council's annual winter retreat from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place. There's a long list of agenda items, but the council may not be able to get to them all. Discussion items will include economic development, capital projects and potential park land acquisition.

After a short break the council's normal Tuesday night meeting begins at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 11707 E.Sprague. Agenda items for that meeting include a vote on whether to procede with a proposed Evergreen Road reconstruction project this year, landscaping code amendments and the fire department interlocal agreement.

Feel free to stop by any of the meetings, but don't worry. If you come to the winter retreat, you don't have to stay for the entire day.  

Saturday’s highlights

Liberty Lake Police Officer Mike Bogenreif shows the body camera he used during his shift Jan. 27. SR photo/Jesse Tinsley

We had some great stories for you in Saturday's Valley Voice, so here's your chance to check them out if you missed them Saturday. The Liberty Lake Police Department is investigating getting body cameras for its patrol officers. The department spent the last month testing the cameras and were pleased with the results. The story includes videos of two traffic stops recorded by an officer wearing the camera.

Reporter Lisa Leinberger talked to University Elementary School teacher Linda Honn, who will be inducted into the Washington Music Educators Assocation's Hall of Fame. She has been teaching for 29 years and helped develop the elementary music program for the Central Valley School District.

Last week the Spokane Valley City Council debated whether to add railroad quiet zones to the 2012 budget along with a gateway sign at Appleway and Thierman and a swale project on the west end of Sprague Avenue. In a divided vote, the council decided to remove the quiet zones from the list over concerns about the cost.

Also last week the Lodging Tax Advisory Committee met to discuss the second round of funding requests for 2012. The committee's funding recommendations to the city council raised some controversy last year when they didn't recommend funding for Valleyfest. During last week's discussion only two of the five committee members favored granting any funding to Valleyfest. Instead they recommended giving almost all the money the city has available to the Spokane Regional Convention and Visitors Bureau. It will be up to the city council, however, to decide what groups are funded and with how much.

City Council meeting tonight

Tonight's Spokane Valley City Council meeting doesn't look terribly busy, but there are some interesting items on the agenda for discussion. There will be a presentation on Spokane River trails and improvements as well as discussions on a proposed street preservation project on Evergreen from 16th to 32nd and on 32nd from Evergreen to Best Road. The council will also discuss whether or not to add several capital projects to the 2012 budget. The meeting begins at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague.

No Valley council meeting tonight

This is just a reminder that there is no Spokane Valley City Council meeting tonight. Most council members are in Olympia this week for the City Legislative Action Conference, which includes meetings with legislators. The next scheduled meeting is at 6 p.m. on Jan. 31.

Today’s highlights

Tom Towey was recently elected to his second term as mayor of Spokane Valley. Since the city has a city manager form of government, the job is mostly ceremonial, but it keeps Towey busy. Towey was first elected mayor two years ago during his first meeting as a council member. SR photo/Colin Mulvany

Dust the snow off your boots and settle in for a look at today's Valley Voice. Spokane Valley Mayor Tom Towey was just re-elected to a second term as mayor. He recently took a look back at his first two years in office and looks ahead to the city's future.

Reporter Lisa Leinberger was at the recent Liberty Lake City Council meeting where new mayor Steve Peterson talked more about his plan to use land the city owns to expand the city's farmers market. The council also discussed the policy governing absences by council members. The council is also planning a special meeting for Jan. 31 to select a new council member.

The Spokane Valley City Council discussed several things at their meeting, including the city's snow plan, the Shoreline Master Program and putting a gateway sign at Appleway and Thierman. Everyone seems to like the idea of a sign, but the estimated $115,000 to $122,000 cost for a sign and landscaping is proving hard to swallow for some council members.  

Saturday’s highlights

Students from Orchard Center Elementary School march down a street near the school Friday, during a celebration of Martin Luther King Day. The students made signs and performed a skit at an assembly. SR photo/Jesse Tinsley.

It's a windy Tuesday morning out there as we come off a three day weekend and prepare for the first big snowstorm of the winter. But before we look forward to that, it's time to look back to Saturday's Valley Voice. Reporter Lisa Leinberger stopped by Orchard Center Elementary last week while the students put on a skit on Martin Luther King Jr. and had their own march near the school.

The Spokane Valley City Council voted somewhat reluctantly last week to approve the renewal of the city's street maintenance contract. The contract, which includes some snow plowing duties, has been the topic of discussion for several weeks.

The Spokane Valley Public Works Department held a community meeting last week to talk about this summer's planned reconstruction project on Sprague Ave. between Evergreen and Sullivan Road. The project should start around mid-May and last somehwere between 10-12 weeks.

The congregation of the Veradale United Church of Christ recently voted to become an "open and affirming" congregation. They crafted a statement that welcomes all people, including gays and lesbians.

Today’s highlights

A volunteer assesses Kole LeGrant’s reading skills at Central Valley Kindergarten Center on Monday. SR photo/Kathy Plonka

Happy chilly Thursday morning, everyone. Today's Valley Voice is full of good stories to keep you occupied as you sip that morning cup of coffee. The city of Spokane Valley may be considering entering a partnership with the Spokane County Library District to buy 8 acres of vacant land that could be used to build a new Spokane Valley library branch and expand a nearby city park. The land, located at Sprague and Herald, is owned by the Pring Corporation. The company is refusing to split up the land and the district only needs four acres for its project.

Reporter Lisa Leinberger has a story on retired teachers and educators who volunteer three times a year to administer reading assessment tests to students at the Central Valley Kindergarten Center. The Liberty Lake Police Department has plans to test a personal video camera over the next month. The small camera attaches to the officer's shirt and records audio and video. The department is considering outfitting all its officers with the cameras if the test goes well.

Correspondent Cindy Hval has a touching Front Porch column that any parent of older children can identify with. Children grow up, move out and move on, leaving the parent in their car clutching the keys and wondering why it's so quiet all of the sudden.

Spokane Valley mayor elected tonight

The Spokane Valley City Council will elect a new mayor at tonight's council meeting, or they could decide to vote in Mayor Tom Towey for a second term. The city has a city manager form of government and the position of mayor is largely ceremonial. The mayor runs the council meetings and represents the city at public events.

Tonight's meeting will also include a vote on the city's street maintenance contract, which has been the subject of lengthy debate at several previous meetings. The meeting starts at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague.

Today’s highlights

We've got some great reads in today's Valley Voice. Correspondent Cindy Hval has a powerful story on the Santos family, who were involved in a collision with a drunk driver last summer. The family has been supported by the community as they slowly recover.

Recently retired Spokane Valley City Council member Bill Gothmann recently took a look back at his work with the city that dates back to before incorporation. He talked about his accomplishments and frustrations, but said overall that he has no regrets.

Reporter Lisa Leinberger attended the first Liberty Lake City Council meeting with new mayor Steve Peterson. It was a well attended, festive meeting with the swearing in of Peterson and two new council members. It was announced during the meeting that councilman Ryan Romney has resigned. The city is now accepting applications for a replacement to finish his term.  

Saturday’s highlights

Greenacres Liquor Store manager Natalie Murphy and owner Keith Peterson are confident that their location and loyal customers will enable them to successfully compete against big-box stores when state-run stores close and liquor sales are privatized. SR photo/J. Bart Rayniak

If it's a Tuesday morning in a holiday week, it's time for the Saturday Valley Voice highlights. Liquor stores from Millwood to Liberty Lake to Greenacres are considering whether to stay open under the new rules in place under the intitiative that passed to remove the state from the liquor business. Everyone seems unsure how things will work under the new rules, but some are determined to stay open. Others are planning to close.

Repoter Lisa Leinberger talked to University High School principal Daryl Hart, who plans to retire this year. He has been at the school for eight years, topping off a 38 year career in education. The Spokane Valley City Council discussed the city's snow plowing policy and whether the rules about plowing the residential streets on the Valley floor should be changed.

Correspondent Steve Christilaw has a story on the girls basketball team at West Valley High School. It's a young team, but coach Loren Carlon appears confident that the team will rebuild.

Odds and ends

I've got a few tidbits to share on next week. There is no Spokane Valley City Council meeting on Tuesday. (Another Tuesday night off. Whatever shall I do?) Since Monday is a holiday, I won't be in the office or on the blog. Look for your Saturday Valley Voice highlights on Tuesday morning. It's been fairly slow all around lately, so I'm hoping things will pick up in 2012 and I'll be able to post more. Happy New Year, everyone. See you next year.

Today’s highlights

Spokane Aerial Performance Arts founder and instructor Sherrie Martin works with Carolyn Kinghorn on Dec. 4 as she attempts an arrow maneuver while hanging upside down on long pieces of silk fabric. SR photo/J. Bart Rayniak

It's time to check out the highlights from today's Valley Voice as we pause mid-way between Christmas and New Year's. Reporter Lisa Leinberger stopped in at East Valley High School's traditional formal holiday lunch that they do every year right before winter break. No one is quite sure how long the tradition has lasted, but everyone seems to love it.

The Spokane Valley City Council once again discussed the renewal of the city's street maintenance contract. Some council members have been pushing to rebid the contract early before it ends. At the end of the night the council agreed to bring the renewal back for a vote at the Jan. 10 meeting. Former East Valley School District superintendent Chuck Stocker has been named the citizen of the year by the Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce. Though he officially retired years ago, he spends much of his days volunteering in the community.

Correspondent Cindy Hval has a story on an interesting new fitness business, Spokane Aerial Performance Arts, that sends students shimmying up long swaths of silk suspended from the ceiling.  

No council meeting this week

This is just a reminder that there is no Spokane Valley City Council meeting tonight. The next meeting is set for Dec. 27 and the agenda looks pretty full. The Mayor will appoint two planning commission members and there will be discussions on the city's snow plowing policies, the street maintenance contract and the street sweeping contract.

Spokane Valley council meetings have been running long lately, but after seeing yesterday's Spokane City Council meeting stretch until 1:30 a.m., I don't think I'll complain so much about the occasional 10 p.m. meeting. Yes, you read right; 1:30 a.m. And the meeting started at 6 p.m. 

Saturday’s highlights

University High School sophomores Ashley Lewis and Lindsey Knight sign holiday cards and attach them to toys for children adopted by their Titan advisory period class. SR photo/J. Bart Rayniak

It's another lovely Monday morning, which means it is time for the Saturday Valley Voice highlights. Reporter Lisa Leinberger spoke to students at University High School who participated in the school's annual Adopt-A-Tot toy drive.

The Spokane Valley Police Department has been accredited by the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs. They are the only contract law enforcement agency in Washington to take this step. The Spokane Valley City Council voted to lower the speed limit on a stretch of Mission between Flora and Barker in Greenacres. The city is also considering whether to keep the traffic light at Sprague and Progress.

Correspondent Steve Christilaw has a story on second year Freeman boys basketball coach John Graham. He brought a new style of coaching to the school that has apparently been successful.

Today’s highlights

The Clock Tower in Riverfront Park originally was part of the Great Northern Railway Depot building. The depot opened on May 30, 1902. The structures were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. SR file photo.

Thursday brings you another edition of the Valley Voice on your front porch (or on your computer screen). In today's edition reporter Lisa Leinberger has a story on the Reading Buddies program at Opportunity Elementary School. The school brings in volutneers from Eastpoint Church to help third graders practice their reading skills.

There was an interesting twist at this week's Spokane Valley City Council meeting, where a council member said that Valleyfest organizers had been offered money in years past to not apply for lodging tax funding. The discussion was part of the ongoing debate over the council's decision to not grant Valleyfest any lodging tax money this year.

Lisa also has a story on several decisions made by the Liberty Lake City Council. The council voted to approve the 2012 budget, pay of a golf course bond and reduce the city's utility tax to 3 percent. The Clock Tower in Riverfront Park isn't in Spokane Valley, of course, but it is a regional icon. Correspondent Stefanie Pettit has a story on the landmark and the man who keeps it running.

Saturday’s highlights

Mike Frucci and his wife Vicki sort through books at the Children's Book Bank at the old University High School. SR photo/J. Bart Rayniak

Good Monday morning, everyone. I have a few highlights from Saturday's Valley Voice in case you missed them. Reporter Lisa Leinberger wrote a story about a hidden gem, the Children's Book Bank. The bank allows teachers to come and pick out free books for their students. There have been more than 100,000 books distributed since 1997.

The Spokane Valley City Council agreed to accept grants for two road construction projects, the reconstruction of Sprague between Evergreen and Sullivan and the completion of Mansfield Ave. east of Pines. The Mayor is interviewing 12 applicants for the two vacant Spokane Valley Planning Commission seats. His recommendation for the appointments is expected at the Dec. 27 council meeting.

Correspondent Valerie Putnam has a report from the Millwood City Council meeting. Finances in the city are apparently not as dire as they first appeared, but the council did approve a 2 percent natural gas utility tax.

Today’s highlights

The landowner of a 3.77-acre parcel, just west of Shelley Lake and north of Central Valley High School at 15818 E. Fourth Ave., is proposing to build 41 townhomes. SR photo/J. Bart Rayniak

First of all, let me apologize for being MIA from the blog a lot this week. I was moving my base of operations and have spent a lot of time packing and unpacking files. But I'm all settled in now, so it's back to normal. Today's Valley Voice is full of news stories, including one from reporter Lisa Leinberger on the fun High 5 program at Evergreen Middle School. Nearly all the students have signed a pledge to stay drug free and participate in High 5 events.

Valleyfest organizers are worried about the future of the annual festival in the aftermath of the decision by the Spokane Valley City Council not to grant lodging tax funding. There will be a second round of applications accepted, but organizers worry it may be too late. This week the council also had a lengthy discussion on the city's street maintenance contract and whether the term is too long and if the contract should be re-bid.

A hearing was held last week on a proposed 41 townhome development just west of Shelley Lake on Fourth Ave. Neighbors spoke against the project because they believe it violates a developer's agreement negotiated between Spokane Valley and the property owner. A decision on whether to approve the plan for the development should come within two weeks.

Lisa also has a report on the Liberty Lake City Council budget discussions this week. The council decided to have a special meeting next week to discuss it further.

Spokane Valley gets road grants

Word has come in that the city of Spokane Valley has been awarded Transportation Improvement Board grants to pay for the extension of Mansfield Ave. east of Pines and the reconstruction of Sprague Avenue from Evergreen to Sullivan Road. The Spokane Valley City Council is scheduled to vote tonight on whether to accept the grants.

Other items on the council's agenda tonight include a discussion of the city's capital projects list, gateway signs, the street maintenance contract and the street sweeping contract. The meeting begins at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague.

Saturday’s highlights

West Valley junior Jacque Swanson, left, and senior Linda Juitt have helped open Inspire, a clothing store for lower-income and budget-minded students. As a part of their Family, Career and Community Leaders of America program, they’ve opened the in-school store two days a week. SR photo/J. Bart Rayniak

School and city news dominated the Saturday Valley Voice. Reporter Lisa Leinberger weighed in with a story on longtime Central Valley board member Cynthia McMullen, who has retired after 24 years. Lisa also met up with a few high school girls who have set up a store at West Valley High School called Inspire. The store is there to sell designer clothes for prices low enough that all students can afford them.

The Spokane Valley City Council had a lengthy discussion last week on the speed limit on Mission Ave. between Flora and Barker. No decision was made, but they did agree to move forward on a vote this month to consider whether the limit should be changed from 35 miles per hour. The council also heard a report on the Shoreline Management Program, which is currently stalled. A new plan must be approved by 2013.

In more school news, correspondent Steve Christilaw had a story about new West Valley High School wrestling coach Mike Bundy. Last year he was the assistant wrestling coach at Central Valley High School.