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  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Two boys playing in a barn near East Sprague came upon a sinister cache: a bottle of nitroglycerine, a box of dynamite caps, some …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago An “organized band of desperadoes” were at work in the Newport, Wash., area. A month earlier, they had robbed a bank at Priest River.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Rev. J.W. Johnson of Westminster Congregational Church in Spokane preached a sermon urging tolerance toward Japanese immigrants.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The “stenogs” – stenographers – in the city’s legal department were apparently fed up with secondhand smoke, although that term probably didn’t even exist …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The president of the Inland Automobile Association advocated a new kind of law for Spokane: A “jay-walker” law.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Ancient Order of the Bearded Knights was refusing to yield under the sharp edge of public pressure.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Game warden Ivy Collins was in his lonely camp on the Spokane River, questioning a man named Emmet Folmsbee about a sack of trout …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago “Vicious canines” were raising havoc in Spokane’s downtown neighborhoods.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane police received an important clue in the A.J. Williams murder case. A 10-year-old boy told his friends that his father had murdered young …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Judge J. Stanley Webster went through the roof at what he called a “miserable” police scheme to “browbeat” his court over one of his …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Judge J. Stanley Webster ruled that Elizabeth Weber, 17, was in fact illegally imprisoned by Spokane authorities. He instructed the jury in her civil …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Elizabeth Weber, 17, “swooned away” in the courtroom for the third time in two days during testimony in her $10,000 false imprisonment civil suit …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Spokane Daily Chronicle editorial page offered its plan for preventing “crooks, sharpers, touts, thieves and thugs” from overrunning Spokane as summer approached: Run …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Union Park Baptist Church was crowded for the funeral services for Albert J. Williams, 19, the victim of what the minister called “the …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago A story out of Reno, Nev., the divorce capital of the West, had Spokane tongues wagging.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The attitude toward mental illness in 1913 can be summed up by the names of the two major institutions in Medical Lake: The Insane …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Mrs. Virginia Allen was fed up with what she called the “freak” laws the Spokane city commissioners insisted on passing. She was particularly incensed …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Gov. Ernest Lister traveled to Cheney and unveiled an architect’s drawing of the grand new Cheney Normal School building.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The city’s humane officer (dogcatcher) delivered an alarming statistic: Between 2,000 and 3,000 dogs were running at large in Spokane.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago A birth announcement made the front page: Lillian Thais Simian had arrived to Mr. and Mrs. Spider Simian, residing at the Manito Park Zoo.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago F.J. Kline, the wealthy president and manager of the Lamb-Davis Lumber Co., was sent to the Eastern Washington Hospital for the Insane after a …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The seniors of Lewis and Clark High School were seeking the loan of a baby.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago A “pretty Finnish maiden,” Miss Fulda Aarl, 20, and her brother John, 10, disembarked from a train in tiny Winona, Wash., in the Palouse …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Chicago Grand Opera arrived in Spokane to present its spectacular production of “Thais” by Massenet at the Auditorium Theater.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Elizabeth H. Christian, the first female lobbyist in the state, filed a detailed expense account of her stint in Olympia – and The Spokesman-Review’s …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago A “maniac” named A. Carlson had vowed that every time he met a “rabbit, a lion or a woman,” he must kill them.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Northern Pacific Railroad gathered together “40 Negro waiters, all of whom boast vocal accomplishments,” to entertain the passengers on its North Coast Limited …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Fred “Pug” Miller, 17, was the leader of a gang of boys who stole a motorcycle from a garage and spent all night on …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago A mystery surrounding the death of Myrtle Moode, 22, a stenographer, was solved – but only partially.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Spokesman-Review editorialized over the importance of music as a vital factor in building a city. Commerce and business are important, said the editors, …

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